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This American Land Previous Broadcasts

Digging for Dinosaurs, Sonoran Desert Protection, "Swamp People" (Episode #208)

KQED World: Sun, Sep 30, 2012 -- 6:30 AM

Digging for Dinosaurs: Talk about a special delivery! Co-host Caroline Raville got to witness the recovery of thousands of pounds of dinosaur fossils by helicopter, deep in the Utah desert. Paleontologists from the Bureau of Land Management call Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument one of the best "bone yards" on the planet. Scientists continue to identify new species of dinosaurs and other reptiles in this remote area. Many are 75 million years old!
Sonoran Desert Protection: There's a quiet beauty in Arizona's Sonoran Desert. A wide range of residents work to make sure wildlife and ancient artifacts here are protected, now and for the future. You'll meet a pastor who's come up with a game for his young parishioners to learn about nature. Local farmers embrace the daily visits of wild animals to their land. Conservationists, and even the U.S. Air Force, realize the need to keep this land safe for future generations.
"Swamp People": The Okefenokee Swamp is constantly changing, from its river trails to its alligators and beautiful bird populations. Sharon Collins of Georgia Public Broadcasting joins some self-proclaimed "swamp people" who make their living in this National Wildlife Refuge. It is a wetland of international importance, but for anyone who visits, it is simply a captivating place to watch plants and animals.

Arctic White Geese, Veterans in the Great Outdoors, Tracking a Coral Killer (Episode #209)

KQED World: Sat, Sep 29, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

Arctic White Geese: Snow geese and Ross's geese make an almost unimaginable 3,000-mile migration each year. So it's no wonder they enjoy spending a month or so in eastern Oregon, "bulking up" on tender grasses and nutritious bugs. The folks from Oregon Field Guide have captured the beauty of thousands of these birds on their stopover to the Arctic. Dedicated "citizen scientists" spend time during the birds' respite to study them. Some say the sky is so filled with geese that it often looks like a snowstorm!
Veterans in the Great Outdoors: Some military veterans returning from combat have physical scars. Others have mental stresses that can also impact their families. We join the Sierra Club's Stacy Bare, a U.S. Army veteran, on an adventure down the Colorado River, where veterans deepen their connections with the land, and one another. The camaraderie and the healing power of nature come through in this beautiful and rugged setting.
Tracking a Coral Killer: It's a detective story that has unfolded in the waters off Key West, Florida. What's been killing the Elkhorn coral? Biologist Kathryn Sutherland has identified human sewage as the source of the coral-killing pathogen that causes white pox disease. Elkhorn coral was listed for protection as an endangered species in 2006, largely due to white pox disease. Sutherland works with water treatment facilities in south Florida to try to make sure water is cleared of this pathogen before it goes back into the Atlantic.

Digging for Dinosaurs, Sonoran Desert Protection, "Swamp People" (Episode #208)

KQED World: Wed, Sep 26, 2012 -- 6:00 AM

Digging for Dinosaurs: Talk about a special delivery! Co-host Caroline Raville got to witness the recovery of thousands of pounds of dinosaur fossils by helicopter, deep in the Utah desert. Paleontologists from the Bureau of Land Management call Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument one of the best "bone yards" on the planet. Scientists continue to identify new species of dinosaurs and other reptiles in this remote area. Many are 75 million years old!
Sonoran Desert Protection: There's a quiet beauty in Arizona's Sonoran Desert. A wide range of residents work to make sure wildlife and ancient artifacts here are protected, now and for the future. You'll meet a pastor who's come up with a game for his young parishioners to learn about nature. Local farmers embrace the daily visits of wild animals to their land. Conservationists, and even the U.S. Air Force, realize the need to keep this land safe for future generations.
"Swamp People": The Okefenokee Swamp is constantly changing, from its river trails to its alligators and beautiful bird populations. Sharon Collins of Georgia Public Broadcasting joins some self-proclaimed "swamp people" who make their living in this National Wildlife Refuge. It is a wetland of international importance, but for anyone who visits, it is simply a captivating place to watch plants and animals.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 26, 2012 -- 9:00 AM

Beaver Builders, Wrangling Water, Body Electric, Census in the Smokies (Episode #207)

KQED World: Sun, Sep 23, 2012 -- 6:30 AM

Beaver Builders: Beavers are nature's engineers. It turns out they are also good at restoring ailing ecosystems. In eastern Oregon, researchers are doing some extreme fieldwork (snorkeling in rivers and streams in the middle of the night, in the middle of winter!) to learn more about how beaver dams are helping create healthier streams and rivers for salmon, trout, songbirds, and for nearby communities.
Wrangling Water: Cattle are not the only things being rounded up at some Florida ranches. Residents are also herding water! And it's proving to be a good thing both for the economy and the environment. A pilot program pays ranchers to use their low-lying lands to store water. Water that's captured during the wet season can then be slowly released during dry months into the tributaries of Lake Okeechobee. < br />Body Electric: Ever listen to a fish? It's possible with an electric knifefish! While better known electric eels use electricity to stun their prey, these creatures use electricity to navigate and communicate. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University are intrigued by this sixth "electro sense," and are learning more about how these fish use this tool to find their way around - and locate their next meal.
Census in the Smokies: This nature audit has been going on for 10 years and gives scientists a good idea about the trends of life in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. A small army of "citizen scientists" help researchers collect specimens, and then analyze their findings.

Digging for Dinosaurs, Sonoran Desert Protection, "Swamp People" (Episode #208)

KQED World: Sat, Sep 22, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

Digging for Dinosaurs: Talk about a special delivery! Co-host Caroline Raville got to witness the recovery of thousands of pounds of dinosaur fossils by helicopter, deep in the Utah desert. Paleontologists from the Bureau of Land Management call Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument one of the best "bone yards" on the planet. Scientists continue to identify new species of dinosaurs and other reptiles in this remote area. Many are 75 million years old!
Sonoran Desert Protection: There's a quiet beauty in Arizona's Sonoran Desert. A wide range of residents work to make sure wildlife and ancient artifacts here are protected, now and for the future. You'll meet a pastor who's come up with a game for his young parishioners to learn about nature. Local farmers embrace the daily visits of wild animals to their land. Conservationists, and even the U.S. Air Force, realize the need to keep this land safe for future generations.
"Swamp People": The Okefenokee Swamp is constantly changing, from its river trails to its alligators and beautiful bird populations. Sharon Collins of Georgia Public Broadcasting joins some self-proclaimed "swamp people" who make their living in this National Wildlife Refuge. It is a wetland of international importance, but for anyone who visits, it is simply a captivating place to watch plants and animals.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 26, 2012 -- 9:00 AM

Beaver Builders, Wrangling Water, Body Electric, Census in the Smokies (Episode #207)

KQED World: Wed, Sep 19, 2012 -- 6:00 AM

Beaver Builders: Beavers are nature's engineers. It turns out they are also good at restoring ailing ecosystems. In eastern Oregon, researchers are doing some extreme fieldwork (snorkeling in rivers and streams in the middle of the night, in the middle of winter!) to learn more about how beaver dams are helping create healthier streams and rivers for salmon, trout, songbirds, and for nearby communities.
Wrangling Water: Cattle are not the only things being rounded up at some Florida ranches. Residents are also herding water! And it's proving to be a good thing both for the economy and the environment. A pilot program pays ranchers to use their low-lying lands to store water. Water that's captured during the wet season can then be slowly released during dry months into the tributaries of Lake Okeechobee. < br />Body Electric: Ever listen to a fish? It's possible with an electric knifefish! While better known electric eels use electricity to stun their prey, these creatures use electricity to navigate and communicate. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University are intrigued by this sixth "electro sense," and are learning more about how these fish use this tool to find their way around - and locate their next meal.
Census in the Smokies: This nature audit has been going on for 10 years and gives scientists a good idea about the trends of life in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. A small army of "citizen scientists" help researchers collect specimens, and then analyze their findings.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 19, 2012 -- 9:00 AM

Canyon Mysteries, Ailing Alligators, "Lights, Camera, Photosynthesis", Wild Horses (Episode #206)

KQED World: Sun, Sep 16, 2012 -- 6:30 AM

Canyon Mysteries: A canyon can be an inspiring classroom, whether you are eight or 80. The stories behind two Georgia canyons could not be any different: Cloudland Canyon in the north is a natural wonder. But Providence Canyon in the southwest is now a tourist destination, in spite of the way earlier residents abused the land. Both intriguing stories come from Georgia Public Broadcasting.
Ailing Alligators: It's hard to imagine many threats that alligators can't handle. But in one Florida lake, chemical pollution is devastating these big reptiles with genetic birth defects. A disease sleuth is trying to get to the bottom of this bio-medical mystery, and his findings could help humans as well. We'll take you to Lake Apopka in Central Florida for some daring scientific discovery.
Lights, Camera, Photosynthesis: Ready for your close-up? Some crops in Wisconsin are getting more than their 15 minutes of fame. As they sprout, hundreds of corn plants will have thousands of photos taken, to help researchers learn precisely how they grow. Researchers can track the function of specific genes, with the goal of creating hardier plants that can stay healthy in harsh conditions.
Wild Horses: There's a romantic notion of wild mustangs, running free across the American West. The reality is more complicated. Horses are long-lived and don't have many natural predators, so their populations can quickly get out of control. Adopting one of these magnificent animals can change the lives of horses, and humans. In eastern Oregon and across the West, a lot of animals are looking for loving homes. Find out what's happening to protect them as well as the other wildlife in this beautiful landscape.

Beaver Builders, Wrangling Water, Body Electric, Census in the Smokies (Episode #207)

KQED World: Sat, Sep 15, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

Beaver Builders: Beavers are nature's engineers. It turns out they are also good at restoring ailing ecosystems. In eastern Oregon, researchers are doing some extreme fieldwork (snorkeling in rivers and streams in the middle of the night, in the middle of winter!) to learn more about how beaver dams are helping create healthier streams and rivers for salmon, trout, songbirds, and for nearby communities.
Wrangling Water: Cattle are not the only things being rounded up at some Florida ranches. Residents are also herding water! And it's proving to be a good thing both for the economy and the environment. A pilot program pays ranchers to use their low-lying lands to store water. Water that's captured during the wet season can then be slowly released during dry months into the tributaries of Lake Okeechobee. < br />Body Electric: Ever listen to a fish? It's possible with an electric knifefish! While better known electric eels use electricity to stun their prey, these creatures use electricity to navigate and communicate. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University are intrigued by this sixth "electro sense," and are learning more about how these fish use this tool to find their way around - and locate their next meal.
Census in the Smokies: This nature audit has been going on for 10 years and gives scientists a good idea about the trends of life in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. A small army of "citizen scientists" help researchers collect specimens, and then analyze their findings.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 19, 2012 -- 9:00 AM

Canyon Mysteries, Ailing Alligators, "Lights, Camera, Photosynthesis", Wild Horses (Episode #206)

KQED World: Wed, Sep 12, 2012 -- 6:00 AM

Canyon Mysteries: A canyon can be an inspiring classroom, whether you are eight or 80. The stories behind two Georgia canyons could not be any different: Cloudland Canyon in the north is a natural wonder. But Providence Canyon in the southwest is now a tourist destination, in spite of the way earlier residents abused the land. Both intriguing stories come from Georgia Public Broadcasting.
Ailing Alligators: It's hard to imagine many threats that alligators can't handle. But in one Florida lake, chemical pollution is devastating these big reptiles with genetic birth defects. A disease sleuth is trying to get to the bottom of this bio-medical mystery, and his findings could help humans as well. We'll take you to Lake Apopka in Central Florida for some daring scientific discovery.
Lights, Camera, Photosynthesis: Ready for your close-up? Some crops in Wisconsin are getting more than their 15 minutes of fame. As they sprout, hundreds of corn plants will have thousands of photos taken, to help researchers learn precisely how they grow. Researchers can track the function of specific genes, with the goal of creating hardier plants that can stay healthy in harsh conditions.
Wild Horses: There's a romantic notion of wild mustangs, running free across the American West. The reality is more complicated. Horses are long-lived and don't have many natural predators, so their populations can quickly get out of control. Adopting one of these magnificent animals can change the lives of horses, and humans. In eastern Oregon and across the West, a lot of animals are looking for loving homes. Find out what's happening to protect them as well as the other wildlife in this beautiful landscape.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 12, 2012 -- 9:00 AM

Bison Homecoming, Preserving Tribal Languages, Peregrine Protection, Soaring with Paragliders (Episode #205)

KQED World: Sun, Sep 9, 2012 -- 6:30 AM

Bison Homecoming: The buffalo are back! One hundred years after Native American Michael Pablo sent his captive bison herd to Canada to help preserve the dwindling species, dozens of their direct descendants were released into the bison herd on the American Prairie Reserve in northern Montana. The World Wildlife Fund has been collaborating with the American Prairie Reserve to help restore the grasslands habitat for the bison, birds, and other important native species that roamed the region when Lewis and Clark arrived in 1805.
Preserving Tribal Languages: The passion of tribal elders and 21st century video technology are merging to bring new life to the Ojibwe language. Using "home movies" that depict everyday scenarios, experts at the University of Minnesota-Duluth are helping new generations learn and appreciate the language and culture.
Peregrine Protection: Peregrine falcons are making a comeback-in some most unusual places. With help from bird lovers in Iowa, this once nearly extinct raptor has a new place to call home-atop an Iowa skyscraper! Once nearly wiped out by DDT, local falconers and the state Department of Natural Resources helped design a nest box that's keeping peregrine parents safe and cozy, and helping provide for a healthy new generation.
Soaring with Paragliders: Jumping off a cliff has never been so spectacular! Daredevils in Oregon use thermal currents in a sort of "yacht race in the sky." 160 pilots joined the "Rat Race" in the intricate sport of paragliding. Their only source of power is the thermal lift from hot air. Even the crew of "Oregon Field Guide" at Oregon Public Broadcasting got in on the act during this breathtaking event.

Canyon Mysteries, Ailing Alligators, "Lights, Camera, Photosynthesis", Wild Horses (Episode #206)

KQED World: Sat, Sep 8, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

Canyon Mysteries: A canyon can be an inspiring classroom, whether you are eight or 80. The stories behind two Georgia canyons could not be any different: Cloudland Canyon in the north is a natural wonder. But Providence Canyon in the southwest is now a tourist destination, in spite of the way earlier residents abused the land. Both intriguing stories come from Georgia Public Broadcasting.
Ailing Alligators: It's hard to imagine many threats that alligators can't handle. But in one Florida lake, chemical pollution is devastating these big reptiles with genetic birth defects. A disease sleuth is trying to get to the bottom of this bio-medical mystery, and his findings could help humans as well. We'll take you to Lake Apopka in Central Florida for some daring scientific discovery.
Lights, Camera, Photosynthesis: Ready for your close-up? Some crops in Wisconsin are getting more than their 15 minutes of fame. As they sprout, hundreds of corn plants will have thousands of photos taken, to help researchers learn precisely how they grow. Researchers can track the function of specific genes, with the goal of creating hardier plants that can stay healthy in harsh conditions.
Wild Horses: There's a romantic notion of wild mustangs, running free across the American West. The reality is more complicated. Horses are long-lived and don't have many natural predators, so their populations can quickly get out of control. Adopting one of these magnificent animals can change the lives of horses, and humans. In eastern Oregon and across the West, a lot of animals are looking for loving homes. Find out what's happening to protect them as well as the other wildlife in this beautiful landscape.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 12, 2012 -- 9:00 AM

Bison Homecoming, Preserving Tribal Languages, Peregrine Protection, Soaring with Paragliders (Episode #205)

KQED World: Wed, Sep 5, 2012 -- 9:00 AM

Bison Homecoming: The buffalo are back! One hundred years after Native American Michael Pablo sent his captive bison herd to Canada to help preserve the dwindling species, dozens of their direct descendants were released into the bison herd on the American Prairie Reserve in northern Montana. The World Wildlife Fund has been collaborating with the American Prairie Reserve to help restore the grasslands habitat for the bison, birds, and other important native species that roamed the region when Lewis and Clark arrived in 1805.
Preserving Tribal Languages: The passion of tribal elders and 21st century video technology are merging to bring new life to the Ojibwe language. Using "home movies" that depict everyday scenarios, experts at the University of Minnesota-Duluth are helping new generations learn and appreciate the language and culture.
Peregrine Protection: Peregrine falcons are making a comeback-in some most unusual places. With help from bird lovers in Iowa, this once nearly extinct raptor has a new place to call home-atop an Iowa skyscraper! Once nearly wiped out by DDT, local falconers and the state Department of Natural Resources helped design a nest box that's keeping peregrine parents safe and cozy, and helping provide for a healthy new generation.
Soaring with Paragliders: Jumping off a cliff has never been so spectacular! Daredevils in Oregon use thermal currents in a sort of "yacht race in the sky." 160 pilots joined the "Rat Race" in the intricate sport of paragliding. Their only source of power is the thermal lift from hot air. Even the crew of "Oregon Field Guide" at Oregon Public Broadcasting got in on the act during this breathtaking event.

Fiddler Crabs, Disappearing Chincoteague, California Desert, Hurricane Sleuth (Episode #204)

KQED World: Sun, Sep 2, 2012 -- 6:30 AM

Fiddler Crabs: Between their digging and mating rituals, fiddler crabs can amuse us endlessly! That big, odd claw on the male can be a weapon or an enticement to a female. But these little crustaceans also have a big impact on their environment. From watching them surround their burrows with mud balls, to viewing a parade of thousands of crabs scurrying across the wetlands, scientists are still trying to understand just where these animals fit into the coastal ecosystem.
Disappearing Chincoteague: Virginia's Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge gets 1.4 million visits a year, making it one of the most popular in the country. The refuge is part of Assateague Island, home of the world famous Chincoteague ponies, and also 300 species of birds. But this tourist destination is changing rapidly. Rising sea levels will likely turn grasslands into marshes, drown the wetlands, and erase parts of the island completely. We'll show you how the island is preparing for this dramatic change in landscape.
California Desert: The rugged desert around Death Valley, California is teeming with life. But you need the proper guide to make sure you see it all. 75 year-old Tom Budlong knows this wild place better than just about anyone. And he wants to protect the junipers, the Joshua trees, and the pinon trees from mining and other development. Nearby, date farmer Brian Brown helps eco-tourists learn more about the rich history of the land. They are working with many others to protect this stark but dynamic ecosystem.
Hurricane Sleuth: Not all hurricane hunters need to stand out in a storm to understand these powerful weather events. Geologists are taking a look back, using core samples to study deposits that were washed in during hurricanes. These archives from Mother Nature can paint a picture of the drama that took place hundreds of years ago. Researchers are also exploring the link between climate change and hurricanes-to help determine whether warmer oceans will mean tropical storms will get more intense.

Bison Homecoming, Preserving Tribal Languages, Peregrine Protection, Soaring with Paragliders (Episode #205)

KQED World: Sat, Sep 1, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

Bison Homecoming: The buffalo are back! One hundred years after Native American Michael Pablo sent his captive bison herd to Canada to help preserve the dwindling species, dozens of their direct descendants were released into the bison herd on the American Prairie Reserve in northern Montana. The World Wildlife Fund has been collaborating with the American Prairie Reserve to help restore the grasslands habitat for the bison, birds, and other important native species that roamed the region when Lewis and Clark arrived in 1805.
Preserving Tribal Languages: The passion of tribal elders and 21st century video technology are merging to bring new life to the Ojibwe language. Using "home movies" that depict everyday scenarios, experts at the University of Minnesota-Duluth are helping new generations learn and appreciate the language and culture.
Peregrine Protection: Peregrine falcons are making a comeback-in some most unusual places. With help from bird lovers in Iowa, this once nearly extinct raptor has a new place to call home-atop an Iowa skyscraper! Once nearly wiped out by DDT, local falconers and the state Department of Natural Resources helped design a nest box that's keeping peregrine parents safe and cozy, and helping provide for a healthy new generation.
Soaring with Paragliders: Jumping off a cliff has never been so spectacular! Daredevils in Oregon use thermal currents in a sort of "yacht race in the sky." 160 pilots joined the "Rat Race" in the intricate sport of paragliding. Their only source of power is the thermal lift from hot air. Even the crew of "Oregon Field Guide" at Oregon Public Broadcasting got in on the act during this breathtaking event.

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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