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This American Land Previous Broadcasts

Ferrets and Prairie Dogs, Hidden Gems, Follow the Water, Island Fires (Episode #203)

KQED World: Sun, Aug 26, 2012 -- 6:30 AM

Ferrets and Prairie Dogs: After being nearly wiped out in the early 20th century, the black- footed ferret is making a comeback. It's taken a complicated conservation effort and a captive breeding program to restore this species to the Great Plains. The health of the ferret is tied directly to the success of prairie dogs- animals that have also had plenty of run-ins with humans. Keeping these two playful, adorable species in good shape is also helping save 130 unique plants and animals in this North American prairie ecosystem. < br />Hidden Gems: Whether you are a hiker, skier, or mountain biker, there is plenty to treasure in an area of the Rocky Mountains known as Hidden Gems. A plan that's been 11 years in the making would protect this area as wilderness, creating more habitat corridors for wildlife and protecting these areas from development, motorized vehicles, and unauthorized trail-building. Supporters have worked hard to make sure that the needs of all outdoor lovers are considered. Join us as we hit the trails!
Follow the Water: If scientists want to understand drought, floods, and water supplies, they have to follow the water-every drop of it! At Penn State University, researchers are documenting the flow of water, using tools like infrared lasers and other sophisticated sensors. But to get all the data they need there's some old-fashioned skills necessary too, like climbing trees to collect leaves and branches. These water sleuths will be able to help planners predict changes triggered by accelerating climate change.
Island Fires: Martha's Vineyard is known for water, not fire. That's why some might be surprised that "prescribed burns," a few dozen acres at a time, really boil down to good ecological housekeeping. Ridding areas of the island of flammable shrubbery before it ignites by itself is actually a good way to re-charge the landscape. The ash that's left behind from the fire is a natural fertilizer, giving plants lots of energy. And those controlled burns also give residents peace of mind.

Fiddler Crabs, Disappearing Chincoteague, California Desert, Hurricane Sleuth (Episode #204)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 25, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

Fiddler Crabs: Between their digging and mating rituals, fiddler crabs can amuse us endlessly! That big, odd claw on the male can be a weapon or an enticement to a female. But these little crustaceans also have a big impact on their environment. From watching them surround their burrows with mud balls, to viewing a parade of thousands of crabs scurrying across the wetlands, scientists are still trying to understand just where these animals fit into the coastal ecosystem.
Disappearing Chincoteague: Virginia's Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge gets 1.4 million visits a year, making it one of the most popular in the country. The refuge is part of Assateague Island, home of the world famous Chincoteague ponies, and also 300 species of birds. But this tourist destination is changing rapidly. Rising sea levels will likely turn grasslands into marshes, drown the wetlands, and erase parts of the island completely. We'll show you how the island is preparing for this dramatic change in landscape.
California Desert: The rugged desert around Death Valley, California is teeming with life. But you need the proper guide to make sure you see it all. 75 year-old Tom Budlong knows this wild place better than just about anyone. And he wants to protect the junipers, the Joshua trees, and the pinon trees from mining and other development. Nearby, date farmer Brian Brown helps eco-tourists learn more about the rich history of the land. They are working with many others to protect this stark but dynamic ecosystem.
Hurricane Sleuth: Not all hurricane hunters need to stand out in a storm to understand these powerful weather events. Geologists are taking a look back, using core samples to study deposits that were washed in during hurricanes. These archives from Mother Nature can paint a picture of the drama that took place hundreds of years ago. Researchers are also exploring the link between climate change and hurricanes-to help determine whether warmer oceans will mean tropical storms will get more intense.

Ferrets and Prairie Dogs, Hidden Gems, Follow the Water, Island Fires (Episode #203)

KQED World: Wed, Aug 22, 2012 -- 6:00 AM

Ferrets and Prairie Dogs: After being nearly wiped out in the early 20th century, the black- footed ferret is making a comeback. It's taken a complicated conservation effort and a captive breeding program to restore this species to the Great Plains. The health of the ferret is tied directly to the success of prairie dogs- animals that have also had plenty of run-ins with humans. Keeping these two playful, adorable species in good shape is also helping save 130 unique plants and animals in this North American prairie ecosystem. < br />Hidden Gems: Whether you are a hiker, skier, or mountain biker, there is plenty to treasure in an area of the Rocky Mountains known as Hidden Gems. A plan that's been 11 years in the making would protect this area as wilderness, creating more habitat corridors for wildlife and protecting these areas from development, motorized vehicles, and unauthorized trail-building. Supporters have worked hard to make sure that the needs of all outdoor lovers are considered. Join us as we hit the trails!
Follow the Water: If scientists want to understand drought, floods, and water supplies, they have to follow the water-every drop of it! At Penn State University, researchers are documenting the flow of water, using tools like infrared lasers and other sophisticated sensors. But to get all the data they need there's some old-fashioned skills necessary too, like climbing trees to collect leaves and branches. These water sleuths will be able to help planners predict changes triggered by accelerating climate change.
Island Fires: Martha's Vineyard is known for water, not fire. That's why some might be surprised that "prescribed burns," a few dozen acres at a time, really boil down to good ecological housekeeping. Ridding areas of the island of flammable shrubbery before it ignites by itself is actually a good way to re-charge the landscape. The ash that's left behind from the fire is a natural fertilizer, giving plants lots of energy. And those controlled burns also give residents peace of mind.

Wolverines, Desert Wilderness, Military Base Makeover (Episode #202)

KQED World: Sun, Aug 19, 2012 -- 6:30 AM

Among the most solitary and elusive mammals in North America, wolverines were wiped out decades ago by fur traders and poison in the lower 48 states. Now these mammals with a ferocious reputation are making a slow comeback, migrating south from Canada. It takes rugged and dedicated scientists and photographers to sneak a peek into their world! See how they are working to understand and preserve the wolverine's habitat.
For decades U.S. soldiers headed for battle spent weeks in training at Fort Ord, California. Trucks, tanks, grenades and artillery they spread over this land on the Pacific Coast. When the base was shuttered in the early 1990s the community nearby was devastated economically. But residents, the military and local businesses put their heads together to give a re-birth to these tens of thousands of acres. Now it attracts hikers, mountain bikers, researchers, even young school kids who can share and enjoy this land. Host Bruce Burkhardt takes us on a tour.
What do casino executives, Moapa Paiute Indians and nature photographers have in common? They are all eager to protect an area known as Gold Butte in Nevada. The group "Friends of Gold Butte" is working to add the highest federal protection to the region, by designating it a wilderness. This could help add law enforcement to this huge acreage, to protect ancient cultural sites and prevent vandalism in this stark and beautiful desert.
It's a detective story that has unfolded in the waters off Key West, Florida. What's been killing the Elkhorn coral? Biologist Kathryn Sutherland has identified human sewage as the source of the coral-killing pathogen that causes white pox disease. Elkhorn coral was listed for protection as an endangered species in 2006, largely due to white pox disease. Sutherland works with water treatment facilities in south Florida to try to make sure water is cleared of this pathogen before it goes back into the Atlantic.

Ferrets and Prairie Dogs, Hidden Gems, Follow the Water, Island Fires (Episode #203)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 18, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

Ferrets and Prairie Dogs: After being nearly wiped out in the early 20th century, the black- footed ferret is making a comeback. It's taken a complicated conservation effort and a captive breeding program to restore this species to the Great Plains. The health of the ferret is tied directly to the success of prairie dogs- animals that have also had plenty of run-ins with humans. Keeping these two playful, adorable species in good shape is also helping save 130 unique plants and animals in this North American prairie ecosystem. < br />Hidden Gems: Whether you are a hiker, skier, or mountain biker, there is plenty to treasure in an area of the Rocky Mountains known as Hidden Gems. A plan that's been 11 years in the making would protect this area as wilderness, creating more habitat corridors for wildlife and protecting these areas from development, motorized vehicles, and unauthorized trail-building. Supporters have worked hard to make sure that the needs of all outdoor lovers are considered. Join us as we hit the trails!
Follow the Water: If scientists want to understand drought, floods, and water supplies, they have to follow the water-every drop of it! At Penn State University, researchers are documenting the flow of water, using tools like infrared lasers and other sophisticated sensors. But to get all the data they need there's some old-fashioned skills necessary too, like climbing trees to collect leaves and branches. These water sleuths will be able to help planners predict changes triggered by accelerating climate change.
Island Fires: Martha's Vineyard is known for water, not fire. That's why some might be surprised that "prescribed burns," a few dozen acres at a time, really boil down to good ecological housekeeping. Ridding areas of the island of flammable shrubbery before it ignites by itself is actually a good way to re-charge the landscape. The ash that's left behind from the fire is a natural fertilizer, giving plants lots of energy. And those controlled burns also give residents peace of mind.

Wolverines, Desert Wilderness, Military Base Makeover (Episode #202)

KQED World: Wed, Aug 15, 2012 -- 6:00 AM

Among the most solitary and elusive mammals in North America, wolverines were wiped out decades ago by fur traders and poison in the lower 48 states. Now these mammals with a ferocious reputation are making a slow comeback, migrating south from Canada. It takes rugged and dedicated scientists and photographers to sneak a peek into their world! See how they are working to understand and preserve the wolverine's habitat.
For decades U.S. soldiers headed for battle spent weeks in training at Fort Ord, California. Trucks, tanks, grenades and artillery they spread over this land on the Pacific Coast. When the base was shuttered in the early 1990s the community nearby was devastated economically. But residents, the military and local businesses put their heads together to give a re-birth to these tens of thousands of acres. Now it attracts hikers, mountain bikers, researchers, even young school kids who can share and enjoy this land. Host Bruce Burkhardt takes us on a tour.
What do casino executives, Moapa Paiute Indians and nature photographers have in common? They are all eager to protect an area known as Gold Butte in Nevada. The group "Friends of Gold Butte" is working to add the highest federal protection to the region, by designating it a wilderness. This could help add law enforcement to this huge acreage, to protect ancient cultural sites and prevent vandalism in this stark and beautiful desert.
It's a detective story that has unfolded in the waters off Key West, Florida. What's been killing the Elkhorn coral? Biologist Kathryn Sutherland has identified human sewage as the source of the coral-killing pathogen that causes white pox disease. Elkhorn coral was listed for protection as an endangered species in 2006, largely due to white pox disease. Sutherland works with water treatment facilities in south Florida to try to make sure water is cleared of this pathogen before it goes back into the Atlantic.

Critical Colorado, Checkups for Manatees, Appalachian Forests (Episode #201)

KQED World: Sun, Aug 12, 2012 -- 6:30 AM

The Colorado River brings drinking water, irrigation, recreation and livelihood to millions of people in the West. But it's clear now that there's not an unlimited supply of this precious resource. Business owners on and near the river are working to make sure their neighbors, and policy makers in Washington, get a complete picture of how critical this river is. Traveling through Arizona and northern Mexico, Bruce Burkhardt shows us there's a lot that needs to be done to protect these waters now and for the future.
Different hikers get different inspiration from the Cherokee National Forest in Tennessee. An artist takes photos that she will later paint; a woodworker studies how trees grow to get ideas for the furniture he builds; and a retired Marine gives back to his community by clearing fallen limbs from the trail. They all support a Congressional designation of this beautiful area as wilderness, so it will be preserved from development for future generations. From the amphibians to the wildflowers to the fishes the array of diversity in the southern Appalachian forest is just astounding!
Shy, smart, curious and vulnerable: Manatees are slow-moving marine mammals that have not had it easy in recent decades. Diseases and red tide, but mostly strikes from boats and propellers, have killed and injured hundreds of them. Both Florida and federal authorities are stepping up protection of manatees, especially in their winter sanctuaries on the state's west coast. Veterinarians and volunteers conduct physicals on these gentle giants to gauge their health and long- term outlook. Our host Caroline Raville swims with some manatees to bring us the story!
Removing a dam can cause big changes to a community, and to the environment. Before cities make the decision to take down a dam that's either deteriorating or no longer needed, they must be prepared. Researchers at Dartmouth College use sophisticated tools to study river systems to help predict what will happen when the dam is gone. It's all about "shoring up" what we know about how rivers flow, in order to make smart choices when it is time for a dam to come down.

Wolverines, Desert Wilderness, Military Base Makeover (Episode #202)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 11, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

Among the most solitary and elusive mammals in North America, wolverines were wiped out decades ago by fur traders and poison in the lower 48 states. Now these mammals with a ferocious reputation are making a slow comeback, migrating south from Canada. It takes rugged and dedicated scientists and photographers to sneak a peek into their world! See how they are working to understand and preserve the wolverine's habitat.
For decades U.S. soldiers headed for battle spent weeks in training at Fort Ord, California. Trucks, tanks, grenades and artillery they spread over this land on the Pacific Coast. When the base was shuttered in the early 1990s the community nearby was devastated economically. But residents, the military and local businesses put their heads together to give a re-birth to these tens of thousands of acres. Now it attracts hikers, mountain bikers, researchers, even young school kids who can share and enjoy this land. Host Bruce Burkhardt takes us on a tour.
What do casino executives, Moapa Paiute Indians and nature photographers have in common? They are all eager to protect an area known as Gold Butte in Nevada. The group "Friends of Gold Butte" is working to add the highest federal protection to the region, by designating it a wilderness. This could help add law enforcement to this huge acreage, to protect ancient cultural sites and prevent vandalism in this stark and beautiful desert.
It's a detective story that has unfolded in the waters off Key West, Florida. What's been killing the Elkhorn coral? Biologist Kathryn Sutherland has identified human sewage as the source of the coral-killing pathogen that causes white pox disease. Elkhorn coral was listed for protection as an endangered species in 2006, largely due to white pox disease. Sutherland works with water treatment facilities in south Florida to try to make sure water is cleared of this pathogen before it goes back into the Atlantic.

Critical Colorado, Checkups for Manatees, Appalachian Forests (Episode #201)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 4, 2012 -- 1:00 PM

The Colorado River brings drinking water, irrigation, recreation and livelihood to millions of people in the West. But it's clear now that there's not an unlimited supply of this precious resource. Business owners on and near the river are working to make sure their neighbors, and policy makers in Washington, get a complete picture of how critical this river is. Traveling through Arizona and northern Mexico, Bruce Burkhardt shows us there's a lot that needs to be done to protect these waters now and for the future.
Different hikers get different inspiration from the Cherokee National Forest in Tennessee. An artist takes photos that she will later paint; a woodworker studies how trees grow to get ideas for the furniture he builds; and a retired Marine gives back to his community by clearing fallen limbs from the trail. They all support a Congressional designation of this beautiful area as wilderness, so it will be preserved from development for future generations. From the amphibians to the wildflowers to the fishes the array of diversity in the southern Appalachian forest is just astounding!
Shy, smart, curious and vulnerable: Manatees are slow-moving marine mammals that have not had it easy in recent decades. Diseases and red tide, but mostly strikes from boats and propellers, have killed and injured hundreds of them. Both Florida and federal authorities are stepping up protection of manatees, especially in their winter sanctuaries on the state's west coast. Veterinarians and volunteers conduct physicals on these gentle giants to gauge their health and long- term outlook. Our host Caroline Raville swims with some manatees to bring us the story!
Removing a dam can cause big changes to a community, and to the environment. Before cities make the decision to take down a dam that's either deteriorating or no longer needed, they must be prepared. Researchers at Dartmouth College use sophisticated tools to study river systems to help predict what will happen when the dam is gone. It's all about "shoring up" what we know about how rivers flow, in order to make smart choices when it is time for a dam to come down.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Aug 8, 2012 -- 6:00 AM
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TV Technical Issues

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    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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