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Nazi Hunters Previous Broadcasts

The Hunt for Martin Bormann (Episode #102Z)

KQED Life: Thu, Oct 18, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

Martin Bormann was vital to Hitler. Bormann made Hitler and the Third Reich rich through thinly veiled extortion schemes such as The Hitler Endowment Fund of German Industry. Bormann, Hitler's doctor Stumpfegger and Artur Axmann (the Head of the Hitler Youth) all left the bunker in Berlin together after Hitler's suicide on April 30, 1945. After Axmann left them at the Lehrter Station, Bormann and Stumpfegger disappeared. In 1972, workmen found two skeletons at the site of the Lehrter station. Analysis of the bones suggested they were Bormann and Stumpfegger. In 1998, a skull was subjected to a DNA test and proclaimed to be that of Bormann. However the skull was found to be full of a type of red clay which is only found in Paraguay. Where he went and how the body returned, still generates controversy.

Hunting The Nazi Rocket Scientists (Episode #101Z)

KQED Life: Thu, Oct 18, 2012 -- 1:00 AM

Brilliant German scientists worked for the Nazi regime in the 1930s and 1940s, creating the V2 ballistic missile. When the war ended, the U.S. was desperate to get its hands on these scientists before the Russians did. They wanted their expertise; the need for military superiority overrode any concerns of bringing these criminals to justice.

The Hunt for Martin Bormann (Episode #102Z)

KQED Life: Wed, Oct 17, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

Martin Bormann was vital to Hitler. Bormann made Hitler and the Third Reich rich through thinly veiled extortion schemes such as The Hitler Endowment Fund of German Industry. Bormann, Hitler's doctor Stumpfegger and Artur Axmann (the Head of the Hitler Youth) all left the bunker in Berlin together after Hitler's suicide on April 30, 1945. After Axmann left them at the Lehrter Station, Bormann and Stumpfegger disappeared. In 1972, workmen found two skeletons at the site of the Lehrter station. Analysis of the bones suggested they were Bormann and Stumpfegger. In 1998, a skull was subjected to a DNA test and proclaimed to be that of Bormann. However the skull was found to be full of a type of red clay which is only found in Paraguay. Where he went and how the body returned, still generates controversy.

Hunting The Nazi Rocket Scientists (Episode #101Z)

KQED Life: Wed, Oct 17, 2012 -- 7:00 PM

Brilliant German scientists worked for the Nazi regime in the 1930s and 1940s, creating the V2 ballistic missile. When the war ended, the U.S. was desperate to get its hands on these scientists before the Russians did. They wanted their expertise; the need for military superiority overrode any concerns of bringing these criminals to justice.

The Hunt for Martin Bormann (Episode #102Z)

KQED 9: Wed, Oct 17, 2012 -- 2:53 AM

Martin Bormann was vital to Hitler. Bormann made Hitler and the Third Reich rich through thinly veiled extortion schemes such as The Hitler Endowment Fund of German Industry. Bormann, Hitler's doctor Stumpfegger and Artur Axmann (the Head of the Hitler Youth) all left the bunker in Berlin together after Hitler's suicide on April 30, 1945. After Axmann left them at the Lehrter Station, Bormann and Stumpfegger disappeared. In 1972, workmen found two skeletons at the site of the Lehrter station. Analysis of the bones suggested they were Bormann and Stumpfegger. In 1998, a skull was subjected to a DNA test and proclaimed to be that of Bormann. However the skull was found to be full of a type of red clay which is only found in Paraguay. Where he went and how the body returned, still generates controversy.

Hunting The Nazi Rocket Scientists (Episode #101Z)

KQED 9: Wed, Oct 17, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

Brilliant German scientists worked for the Nazi regime in the 1930s and 1940s, creating the V2 ballistic missile. When the war ended, the U.S. was desperate to get its hands on these scientists before the Russians did. They wanted their expertise; the need for military superiority overrode any concerns of bringing these criminals to justice.

The Hunt for Martin Bormann (Episode #102Z)

KQED 9: Tue, Oct 16, 2012 -- 8:53 PM

Martin Bormann was vital to Hitler. Bormann made Hitler and the Third Reich rich through thinly veiled extortion schemes such as The Hitler Endowment Fund of German Industry. Bormann, Hitler's doctor Stumpfegger and Artur Axmann (the Head of the Hitler Youth) all left the bunker in Berlin together after Hitler's suicide on April 30, 1945. After Axmann left them at the Lehrter Station, Bormann and Stumpfegger disappeared. In 1972, workmen found two skeletons at the site of the Lehrter station. Analysis of the bones suggested they were Bormann and Stumpfegger. In 1998, a skull was subjected to a DNA test and proclaimed to be that of Bormann. However the skull was found to be full of a type of red clay which is only found in Paraguay. Where he went and how the body returned, still generates controversy.

Hunting The Nazi Rocket Scientists (Episode #101Z)

KQED 9: Tue, Oct 16, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

Brilliant German scientists worked for the Nazi regime in the 1930s and 1940s, creating the V2 ballistic missile. When the war ended, the U.S. was desperate to get its hands on these scientists before the Russians did. They wanted their expertise; the need for military superiority overrode any concerns of bringing these criminals to justice.

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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