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Global Voices Previous Broadcasts

Peace Versus Justice (Episode #501)

KQED World: Tue, Jan 28, 2014 -- 5:00 AM

This documentary examines the role of the International Criminal Court in the trial against rebel leader Joseph Kony, whose Lord' Resistance Army (LRA) has spread death and destruction in Uganda, and battled the government of president Museveni, for nearly 20 years now. But what if the victims of these crimes don't want the ICC's version of justice? The film also takes a look at the problems of applying western concepts of justice to other countries and continents.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 28, 2014 -- 11:00 AM

Cowboys In India (Episode #401)

KQED World: Sun, Jan 26, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

In a remote and impoverished region of India, a London filmmaker is unaware of the trouble he will cause his two endearing, bumbling local guides as they investigate the Corporate Social Responsibility program of a high-profile, London-based mining company. The company plans to mine a local tribe's sacred mountain, and promises to bring all the benefits of modernity to the area. But many of the tribal people vow to fight, preferring a simple life in nature. As allegations accumulate, the filmmaker's ethical stance is put to the test as he tries to get his film "in the can."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 27, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

Where Heaven Meets Hell (Episode #601)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 22, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

Four sulfur miners working at an active volcano in Indonesia search for meaning in their daily struggles and triumphs. This intimate portrait chronicles their attempts to escape the social ills that haunt their community.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 22, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

Girl, Adopted (Episode #617)

KQED World: Sun, Jan 19, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

A contemporary coming-of-age story that follows 13-year-old Weynsht from her orphanage in Ethiopia's capital city to an adoptive American family in rural Arkansas. It captures an irrepressibly adolescent Weynsht as she works to figure out who she is in the aftermath of her adoption, follows her struggle to find love among strangers in the US, and to understand what to make of this love on an unexpected return trip to Ethiopia. Her story offers a real-time, child's-eye view of being adopted across race and culture. Without taking a pro- or anti-adoption position, it acknowledges the complexity involved in this increasingly common experience. The film revolves around the central question: what is it like to get everything you need but to lose everything you know?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 20, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

Rent-a-Family, Inc. (Episode #616)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 15, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

On the surface, Ryuichi looks like an ordinary, 44-year-old Japanese family man. He has a wife and two sons, and a good job in the customer service department at a toy factory. Yet unbeknownst to most - including his own family - he moonlights running his own business providing family members, friends, and even spouses for hire. Ryuichi and his employees are professional stand-ins, part of a growing service industry in Japan that rents out fake spouses, best men, relatives, friends, colleagues, boyfriends and girlfriends, all to spare their clients embarrassment at social functions such as weddings, funerals, or other family gatherings.

Stealing Africa (Episode #524)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 15, 2014 -- 8:00 AM

How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Rent-a-Family, Inc. (Episode #616)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 15, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

On the surface, Ryuichi looks like an ordinary, 44-year-old Japanese family man. He has a wife and two sons, and a good job in the customer service department at a toy factory. Yet unbeknownst to most - including his own family - he moonlights running his own business providing family members, friends, and even spouses for hire. Ryuichi and his employees are professional stand-ins, part of a growing service industry in Japan that rents out fake spouses, best men, relatives, friends, colleagues, boyfriends and girlfriends, all to spare their clients embarrassment at social functions such as weddings, funerals, or other family gatherings.

Stealing Africa (Episode #524)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 15, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Rent-a-Family, Inc. (Episode #616)

KQED World: Mon, Jan 13, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

On the surface, Ryuichi looks like an ordinary, 44-year-old Japanese family man. He has a wife and two sons, and a good job in the customer service department at a toy factory. Yet unbeknownst to most - including his own family - he moonlights running his own business providing family members, friends, and even spouses for hire. Ryuichi and his employees are professional stand-ins, part of a growing service industry in Japan that rents out fake spouses, best men, relatives, friends, colleagues, boyfriends and girlfriends, all to spare their clients embarrassment at social functions such as weddings, funerals, or other family gatherings.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 14, 2014 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 14, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Stealing Africa (Episode #524)

KQED World: Mon, Jan 13, 2014 -- 8:00 AM

How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Rent-a-Family, Inc. (Episode #616)

KQED World: Mon, Jan 13, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

On the surface, Ryuichi looks like an ordinary, 44-year-old Japanese family man. He has a wife and two sons, and a good job in the customer service department at a toy factory. Yet unbeknownst to most - including his own family - he moonlights running his own business providing family members, friends, and even spouses for hire. Ryuichi and his employees are professional stand-ins, part of a growing service industry in Japan that rents out fake spouses, best men, relatives, friends, colleagues, boyfriends and girlfriends, all to spare their clients embarrassment at social functions such as weddings, funerals, or other family gatherings.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 14, 2014 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 14, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Stealing Africa (Episode #524)

KQED World: Mon, Jan 13, 2014 -- 12:00 AM

How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Rent-a-Family, Inc. (Episode #616)

KQED World: Sun, Jan 12, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

On the surface, Ryuichi looks like an ordinary, 44-year-old Japanese family man. He has a wife and two sons, and a good job in the customer service department at a toy factory. Yet unbeknownst to most - including his own family - he moonlights running his own business providing family members, friends, and even spouses for hire. Ryuichi and his employees are professional stand-ins, part of a growing service industry in Japan that rents out fake spouses, best men, relatives, friends, colleagues, boyfriends and girlfriends, all to spare their clients embarrassment at social functions such as weddings, funerals, or other family gatherings.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 14, 2014 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 14, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Stealing Africa (Episode #524)

KQED World: Sun, Jan 12, 2014 -- 8:00 PM

How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Where Heaven Meets Hell (Episode #601)

KQED World: Thu, Jan 9, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Four sulfur miners working at an active volcano in Indonesia search for meaning in their daily struggles and triumphs. This intimate portrait chronicles their attempts to escape the social ills that haunt their community.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 22, 2014 -- 1:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 9, 2014 -- 8:00 AM

The List (Episode #615)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 8, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

An American aid worker fights to save the lives of Iraqis who helped the U.S. reconstruction effort. After leading reconstruction teams in Iraq for two years, 26-year-old Kirk Johnson returns home to discover that many of his former Iraqi colleagues are being killed, kidnapped, or forced into exile by radical militias. Frustrated by a stagnating government bureaucracy that has failed to protect these people, he begins compiling a list of Iraqi allies and helps them find refuge and a new life in America. The List traces the evolution of Kirk's campaign from a one-man crusade into a nationwide grassroots movement.

Give Us The Money (Episode #523)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 8, 2014 -- 8:00 AM

How do you change the world? From Live Aid to Make Poverty History, celebrities have become activists against poverty. Bob Geldof and Bono have been the most prominent voices advocating on behalf of the poor. But have their concerts and campaigns really lifted millions out of poverty? Geldof, Bono and Bill Gates speak candidly about how to lobby effectively and how to play to politicians' weaknesses for glitz and popularity.

The List (Episode #615)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 8, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

An American aid worker fights to save the lives of Iraqis who helped the U.S. reconstruction effort. After leading reconstruction teams in Iraq for two years, 26-year-old Kirk Johnson returns home to discover that many of his former Iraqi colleagues are being killed, kidnapped, or forced into exile by radical militias. Frustrated by a stagnating government bureaucracy that has failed to protect these people, he begins compiling a list of Iraqi allies and helps them find refuge and a new life in America. The List traces the evolution of Kirk's campaign from a one-man crusade into a nationwide grassroots movement.

Give Us The Money (Episode #523)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 8, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

How do you change the world? From Live Aid to Make Poverty History, celebrities have become activists against poverty. Bob Geldof and Bono have been the most prominent voices advocating on behalf of the poor. But have their concerts and campaigns really lifted millions out of poverty? Geldof, Bono and Bill Gates speak candidly about how to lobby effectively and how to play to politicians' weaknesses for glitz and popularity.

The List (Episode #615)

KQED World: Mon, Jan 6, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

An American aid worker fights to save the lives of Iraqis who helped the U.S. reconstruction effort. After leading reconstruction teams in Iraq for two years, 26-year-old Kirk Johnson returns home to discover that many of his former Iraqi colleagues are being killed, kidnapped, or forced into exile by radical militias. Frustrated by a stagnating government bureaucracy that has failed to protect these people, he begins compiling a list of Iraqi allies and helps them find refuge and a new life in America. The List traces the evolution of Kirk's campaign from a one-man crusade into a nationwide grassroots movement.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 7, 2014 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 7, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Give Us The Money (Episode #523)

KQED World: Mon, Jan 6, 2014 -- 8:00 AM

How do you change the world? From Live Aid to Make Poverty History, celebrities have become activists against poverty. Bob Geldof and Bono have been the most prominent voices advocating on behalf of the poor. But have their concerts and campaigns really lifted millions out of poverty? Geldof, Bono and Bill Gates speak candidly about how to lobby effectively and how to play to politicians' weaknesses for glitz and popularity.

The List (Episode #615)

KQED World: Mon, Jan 6, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

An American aid worker fights to save the lives of Iraqis who helped the U.S. reconstruction effort. After leading reconstruction teams in Iraq for two years, 26-year-old Kirk Johnson returns home to discover that many of his former Iraqi colleagues are being killed, kidnapped, or forced into exile by radical militias. Frustrated by a stagnating government bureaucracy that has failed to protect these people, he begins compiling a list of Iraqi allies and helps them find refuge and a new life in America. The List traces the evolution of Kirk's campaign from a one-man crusade into a nationwide grassroots movement.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 7, 2014 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 7, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Give Us The Money (Episode #523)

KQED World: Mon, Jan 6, 2014 -- 12:00 AM

How do you change the world? From Live Aid to Make Poverty History, celebrities have become activists against poverty. Bob Geldof and Bono have been the most prominent voices advocating on behalf of the poor. But have their concerts and campaigns really lifted millions out of poverty? Geldof, Bono and Bill Gates speak candidly about how to lobby effectively and how to play to politicians' weaknesses for glitz and popularity.

The List (Episode #615)

KQED World: Sun, Jan 5, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

An American aid worker fights to save the lives of Iraqis who helped the U.S. reconstruction effort. After leading reconstruction teams in Iraq for two years, 26-year-old Kirk Johnson returns home to discover that many of his former Iraqi colleagues are being killed, kidnapped, or forced into exile by radical militias. Frustrated by a stagnating government bureaucracy that has failed to protect these people, he begins compiling a list of Iraqi allies and helps them find refuge and a new life in America. The List traces the evolution of Kirk's campaign from a one-man crusade into a nationwide grassroots movement.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 7, 2014 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 7, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Education Education (Episode #527)

KQED World: Sat, Jan 4, 2014 -- 6:00 AM

What does an education get you? In ancient times in China, education was the only way out of poverty, in recent times it has been the best way. China's economic boom and talk of the merits of hard work have created an expectation that to study is to escape poverty. But these days China's higher education system only leads to jobs for a few, educating a new generation to unemployment and despair.

Land Rush (Episode #526)

KQED World: Sat, Jan 4, 2014 -- 5:00 AM

How do you feed the world? 75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off ? but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms?

Poor Us: The Animated History of Poverty (Episode #525)

KQED World: Fri, Jan 3, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

Do we know what poverty is? The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age, Ben Lewis's film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality?

Stealing Africa (Episode #524)

KQED World: Fri, Jan 3, 2014 -- 12:00 PM

How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Give Us The Money (Episode #523)

KQED World: Fri, Jan 3, 2014 -- 11:00 AM

How do you change the world? From Live Aid to Make Poverty History, celebrities have become activists against poverty. Bob Geldof and Bono have been the most prominent voices advocating on behalf of the poor. But have their concerts and campaigns really lifted millions out of poverty? Geldof, Bono and Bill Gates speak candidly about how to lobby effectively and how to play to politicians' weaknesses for glitz and popularity.

Poor Us: The Animated History of Poverty (Episode #525)

KQED World: Fri, Jan 3, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

Do we know what poverty is? The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age, Ben Lewis's film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality?

Stealing Africa (Episode #524)

KQED World: Fri, Jan 3, 2014 -- 6:00 AM

How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Give Us The Money (Episode #523)

KQED World: Fri, Jan 3, 2014 -- 5:00 AM

How do you change the world? From Live Aid to Make Poverty History, celebrities have become activists against poverty. Bob Geldof and Bono have been the most prominent voices advocating on behalf of the poor. But have their concerts and campaigns really lifted millions out of poverty? Geldof, Bono and Bill Gates speak candidly about how to lobby effectively and how to play to politicians' weaknesses for glitz and popularity.

Journals of a Wily School (Episode #614)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 1, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

On the hot and crowded streets of Kolkata (formerly Calcutta), 3000 pickpockets ply their trade every day, 300 of them circulating through police custody at any given time. This documentary takes viewers inside the world of these petty thieves and the detectives who doggedly pursue them, day in and day out. With unprecedented access, first-time director Sudeshna Bose follows a young and talented pickpocket named Azad Jalaluddin, revealing in cinema verite style the many layers of his life. The eldest of 5 children, the 22-year-old lives with his family. While his sisters go to school and his father works in the wholesale fish trade, Azad spends his days picking pockets, using drugs and binging on Bollywood films. His mystified father voices frustration over the wayward son who fancies himself a don and compares himself to the stars of the big screen.

Street Ballad: A Jakarta Story (Episode #521)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 1, 2014 -- 8:00 AM

Titi Juwariyah, 27, is a street singer in Jakarta, Indonesia. She leads a challenging, conflicted life - from her migration to Jakarta as a lost teen from the Java countryside to her heartfelt quest for identity and acceptance in her adopted city.
Armed with just a battered guitar, a soulful voice, and a desire for a better life, Titi composes catchy folk tunes to entertain passengers on Jakarta's teeming buses. She dreams of making a career in music but is overwhelmed by the pressures of supporting her troubled family.
When personal crisis strikes, Titi finds herself alone and on the edge of despair. An emotional journey to see her ailing parents in their remote countryside village provides Titi with important perspective and new determination to turn her life around.
Back on the streets of Jakarta, Titi embarks on a brave new quest for independence and legitimacy. But in the process of chasing that dream, she stands to lose the very thing that is closest to her heart.

Journals of a Wily School (Episode #614)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 1, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

On the hot and crowded streets of Kolkata (formerly Calcutta), 3000 pickpockets ply their trade every day, 300 of them circulating through police custody at any given time. This documentary takes viewers inside the world of these petty thieves and the detectives who doggedly pursue them, day in and day out. With unprecedented access, first-time director Sudeshna Bose follows a young and talented pickpocket named Azad Jalaluddin, revealing in cinema verite style the many layers of his life. The eldest of 5 children, the 22-year-old lives with his family. While his sisters go to school and his father works in the wholesale fish trade, Azad spends his days picking pockets, using drugs and binging on Bollywood films. His mystified father voices frustration over the wayward son who fancies himself a don and compares himself to the stars of the big screen.

Street Ballad: A Jakarta Story (Episode #521)

KQED World: Wed, Jan 1, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Titi Juwariyah, 27, is a street singer in Jakarta, Indonesia. She leads a challenging, conflicted life - from her migration to Jakarta as a lost teen from the Java countryside to her heartfelt quest for identity and acceptance in her adopted city.
Armed with just a battered guitar, a soulful voice, and a desire for a better life, Titi composes catchy folk tunes to entertain passengers on Jakarta's teeming buses. She dreams of making a career in music but is overwhelmed by the pressures of supporting her troubled family.
When personal crisis strikes, Titi finds herself alone and on the edge of despair. An emotional journey to see her ailing parents in their remote countryside village provides Titi with important perspective and new determination to turn her life around.
Back on the streets of Jakarta, Titi embarks on a brave new quest for independence and legitimacy. But in the process of chasing that dream, she stands to lose the very thing that is closest to her heart.

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too