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Global Voices Previous Broadcasts

Casablanca Calling (Episode #716)

KQED World: Sun, Sep 14, 2014 -- 7:00 PM

In Morocco, women are being employed as religious leaders - called Morchidat - for the first time, offering advice and guidance in mosques, schools, prisons, and orphanages around the country. The Islam they teach is based on tolerance, compassion and equality.
This documentary follows 3 exceptional women: Karima is witty, mischievous, and outgoing; Bouchra is powerhouse of energy working in the North; Hannane is a poetic soul - warm, wise, and compassionate, who wants to change people's perceptions of the true teachings of Islam - including non-Muslims' conception of religious guides as "scary men with beards."
In the mosques, the Morchidat offer advice on everything from marital relationships, to bringing up children, work, money, and neighborhood disputes. They mentor teenagers in schools and fight against early marriage. They go into orphanages to offer comfort and guidance to children whose parents can't afford to keep them. And they visit prisons to counsel the most vulnerable prisoners, and mediate between the inmates and their estranged families.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 1:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 15, 2014 -- 1:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 15, 2014 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Sep 14, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

Recycle (Episode #715)

KQED World: Sun, Sep 7, 2014 -- 7:00 PM

Zarqa, Jordan's second largest city, is a rundown, industrial metropolis and birthplace of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the notorious mastermind of al Qaeda's terror operations in Iraq who was killed by American forces in 2005.
This documentary reveals the distinct yet intertwined stories of 3 native sons of Zarqa: al-Zarqawi; Abu Ammar, an ex-Mujahadin fighter who now supports his family of 11 by collecting cardboard to recycle; and filmmaker Mahmoud al Massad who, from behind the camera's lens, coolly unravels the knotted threads of poverty, humiliation, and strict religious doctrine that have made the city a continuing source for jihadist recruits.
The central story is Ammar's; his attempts to build a normal life in the impoverished town are thwarted at every turn. He cannot afford his rent; a scheme to sell used vehicles in Iraq fails when he is almost killed by extremists and American soldiers, and the book he is writing - a moderate interpretation of jihad - goes unfinished.
Inscrutable, undaunted, and ever-devout, Ammar labors alone at night in an abandoned storefront transcribing his personal interpretations of scripture from slips of paper stuffed in garbage bags onto an old desktop computer. But, when the war on terror strikes close to home, he is swept up and forced to deal with the reality that his life is falling apart. His surprising decision to try something completely different suggests that, when push comes to shove, desperate acts can emerge from the most ordinary of circumstances.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 8, 2014 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Sep 7, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

Here Comes Uncle Joe (Episode #714)

KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 8:00 AM

He is not their uncle, and his name is not Joe. But to the old ladies of An-dong, a rural community in southeastern Korea, Uncle Joe is almost the only contact they have with the modern world. As the young leave these rural areas to acquire higher education and to find high salary jobs in the cities, there are no services or people to support old people. In this situation, Uncle Joe becomes the only man for the old.
However, his road taken isn't always happy. Because of their advanced years, Joe often encounters his old customer-friends' misery and death. Moreover, as he reflects on his life, he faces his inner conflict and shame. In this film, we see how Uncle Joe serves these communities with humor and attention, how love and friendship are infused in life, and how he overcomes his conflicts with his friends.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

Acrobat (Episode #509)

KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

Fabrice Champion, a renowned trapeze artist, hit another acrobat in mid-air during a show and was paralyzed. Following years of rehabilitation therapy, he returned to the circus as director and teacher.

Here Comes Uncle Joe (Episode #714)

KQED World: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

He is not their uncle, and his name is not Joe. But to the old ladies of An-dong, a rural community in southeastern Korea, Uncle Joe is almost the only contact they have with the modern world. As the young leave these rural areas to acquire higher education and to find high salary jobs in the cities, there are no services or people to support old people. In this situation, Uncle Joe becomes the only man for the old.
However, his road taken isn't always happy. Because of their advanced years, Joe often encounters his old customer-friends' misery and death. Moreover, as he reflects on his life, he faces his inner conflict and shame. In this film, we see how Uncle Joe serves these communities with humor and attention, how love and friendship are infused in life, and how he overcomes his conflicts with his friends.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 1:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Acrobat (Episode #509)

KQED World: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 8:00 AM

Fabrice Champion, a renowned trapeze artist, hit another acrobat in mid-air during a show and was paralyzed. Following years of rehabilitation therapy, he returned to the circus as director and teacher.

Here Comes Uncle Joe (Episode #714)

KQED World: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

He is not their uncle, and his name is not Joe. But to the old ladies of An-dong, a rural community in southeastern Korea, Uncle Joe is almost the only contact they have with the modern world. As the young leave these rural areas to acquire higher education and to find high salary jobs in the cities, there are no services or people to support old people. In this situation, Uncle Joe becomes the only man for the old.
However, his road taken isn't always happy. Because of their advanced years, Joe often encounters his old customer-friends' misery and death. Moreover, as he reflects on his life, he faces his inner conflict and shame. In this film, we see how Uncle Joe serves these communities with humor and attention, how love and friendship are infused in life, and how he overcomes his conflicts with his friends.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 1:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Acrobat (Episode #509)

KQED World: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 12:00 AM

Fabrice Champion, a renowned trapeze artist, hit another acrobat in mid-air during a show and was paralyzed. Following years of rehabilitation therapy, he returned to the circus as director and teacher.

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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