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Mexico -- One Plate at a Time with Rick Bayless Previous Broadcasts

Artisan Mescal (Episode #904H)

KQED Life: Fri, May 31, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Mescal is having a real renaissance, both in Mexico and in fine cocktail emporiums all over the United States. Rick takes us on a journey to see how a small Oaxacan distiller hand-crafts this fine spirit renowned for its rich, smoky complexity and brightness. As with any great artisan product, there's always a great story. With Rick around, there's always great food, from hand-pressed memelas topped with a bright avocado salsa to vinegar-infused snacks. We learn to sip mescal with fresh oranges and sal de gusano - chile-spiked salt. At home, Rick guides us through a mescal tasting and a host of snacks for a do-it-yourself mescal cocktail party.

Confessions of a Carnita-Vore (Episode #709H)

KQED Life: Wed, May 29, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Carnitas - chunks of pork cooked slowly in lard until they're golden and crisp on the outside and meltingly tender inside - are a weekend family tradition in Mexico. At the Medellin Market in Mexico City, Rick gives us an insider's look at how they're made every Saturday and Sunday in a huge copper cauldron, and served up with fresh corn tortillas and crispy chicharron (pork cracklings). But what if a carnitas craving strikes and you're not in Mexico on a weekend? No worries. Back in Chicago, Rick demonstrates his signature method for making fabulous carnitas right in a standard home oven. Then, thinking beyond pork, Rick shares a creative take on carnitas at the splashy seafood restaurant, Contramar, where the dish gets a deep-sea do-over with chunks of fresh-caught tuna. At his fine-dining restaurant, Topolobambo, Rick shares his own state-of-the-carnitas concept: sous vide pork (cooked very slowly in a vacuum-sealed packet) , shredded, formed into a loaf, chilled, sliced and pan-seared in a stunning modern presentation. Then, in his home kitchen, he riffs on that idea, making Duck Carnitas with Crunchy Tomatillo-Avocado Salsa, a dish inspired by the classic French duck confit technique. Instead of the traditional pork cracklings, he makes ultra-easy Crispy Cheese Chicharron, lacy cheese crisps toasted on the griddle, and takes us on a side trip to a Mexico City taqueria for a look at the dramatic, giant version of these "cheese cracklings." The elegant, yet casual, meal is served family-style with plenty of warm tortillas, so everyone can make their own succulent duck tacos.

The Case for Quesadillas (Episode #708H)

KQED Life: Mon, May 27, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

What could be better than a freshly made, gooey, warm quesadilla? Rick answers the question by showing us how to make the flour tortillas from scratch. What could be better than that? Well, actually, in Mexico, Rick explains, quesadillas and flour tortillas have nothing to do with each other. He takes us to the Bazar Sabado, a charming colonial-style labyrinth of handicrafts shops in the heart of Mexico City's bohemian Coyoacan district, to experience the true art of the quesadilla. In the Bazar's shady courtyard, the delicate treats are made the traditional way from freshly ground corn masa, patted onto a massive cast-iron griddle, topped with cheese and fillings and baked to a golden finish. For a more rough-and-tumble look at the same idea, we visit Lagunilla, the city's fantastical flea-market, where vendors turn out all kinds of mouthwatering quesadillas and other toasted-masa snacks on a griddle over a charcoal fire. Then it's on to Paxia, a stunning fine-dining restaurant, where Rick shows us one more style of quesadilla, a cheese-filled pocket of masa that's deep-fried to make a golden turnover. At Paxia, they serve a miniature version of these as an amuse bouche. Across town at La Merced market, Rick checks out the classic cheeses for quesadilla-making, and picks up some requeson, the Mexican version of ricotta. It's a fresh cheese and fresh cheeses are easy to prepare as Rick shows us by making Mexican Fresh Cheese in his Chicago kitchen. Then, he turns it into Luxurious Rustic Griddle-Baked Quesadillas for a romantic date-night dinner with his wife, Deann.

Tacos Hola! (Episode #710H)

KQED Plus: Sun, May 26, 2013 -- 1:30 PM

We find Rick and his daughter, Lanie, at the Mexico City's colorful Sonora Market, an emporium of medicinal herbs and the best place in town to buy cazuelas, the beautifully rustic earthenware cooking and serving casseroles that define a whole class of stews and taco fillings. We tend to think of taquerias for their familiar grilled and griddled fillings, like carne asada. But, Rick explains, there's a whole world of stands and shops that have no grill at all and specialize in satisfyingly homey, slow-cooked fillings made in cazuelas with everything from stewed meat to richly flavorful vegetables. Rick and Lanie check out El Guero, a Mexico City institution, popularly known as "Tacos Hola!," that specializes in slow-cooked taco fillings. Back home in Chicago, Rick and Lanie plan a cazuela-taco dinner. Lanie throws together a quick Pork with Smoky Tomato Sauce and Potatoes in the crockpot before heading off to school. By dinnertime, it'll be meltingly tender and richly flavored. Meanwhile, Rick gathers some chard in the garden, offering a quick intro to the care and tending of this hearty, easy-to-grow vegetable. Then, he turns his harvest into a filling of Creamy Braised Chard, Potatoes and Poblanos and also prepares a Veracruz-Flavored Chilled Seafood. The three fillings, mounded in those charming cazuelas from the Sonora Market, form the centerpiece for a cozy dinner with friends and family.

Off The Beaten Path In Huatulco (Episode #903H)

KQED Life: Fri, May 24, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

The majority of the people who travel to Mexico go for the beaches. Little wonder when the beaches are as pristine as Huatulco's Playa Chahue - complete with the Playa Limpia certification for cleanliness. Still, a man's gotta eat. Not content with a diet of all-inclusive resort dining, Chef Rick Bayless takes us off the beaten path to find great food and even better beaches. You'll be well-advised to follow his lead and start the day at one the local's favorite restaurants, Sabor de Oaxaca, in La Crucecita. There, Rick enjoys Salsa de Huevo (omelets in salsa) before a quick trip to Puerto Escondido for an amazing lunch of wood-fired grilled fish on the Playa Principal. Rick paddle-boards on Playa Carrizalillo, another stunning beach in Puerto Escondido, to work up his appetite for Encamaronadas (crispy, cheesy shrimp tacos). Back in Huatulco Rick enjoys an uber-fresh seafood cocktail at Grillo Marinero before stopping for a nightcap at the Quinta Real Hotel to take in the beauty of it all.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Sat, May 25, 2013 -- 9:30 AM

The Soul of Mole (Episode #707H)

KQED Life: Wed, May 22, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Mole is an idea that's half pre-Columbian, half European, and 100% Mexican - a sauce, a preparation and a national dish that rivals the culinary masterpieces of the world's greatest cuisines. Rick and his daughter, Lanie, set off on a culinary journey to explore the mysteries of mole that takes them from the mile-high piles of dried chiles in Mexico City's vast La Merced market to stalls selling towering mounds of concentrated mole paste. Back in Chicago, they're on a mission to make mole from scratch. It's an all-day labor of love to be sure, but Rick breaks the complex process down into easy steps, giving tips on all the ingredients - from sesame seeds and tomatillos to chiles and chocolate - that give mole its richly layered flavor. As the sauce simmers over a wood fire in the backyard, Rick and Lanie use some of it to make a succulent Lacquered Chicken in Classic Red Mole and whip up some Classic Mexican White Rice with Sweet Plantains and a Mexican crudite platter. As the sun sets, family and friends gather in the garden for a taste of true Mexican soul food: homemade mole in all its slow-simmered glory.

A Ceviche State of Mind (Episode #706H)

KQED Life: Mon, May 20, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Nothing captures the spirit of a day at the beach in Mexico like the fresh seafood cocktail or ceviche. But you don't have to be on the coast to enjoy it. Rick finds a classic version at a favorite spot with the feel of a beachside fish shack - right in the heart of landlocked Mexico City. Then, in search of more "inland ceviche" surprises, he hits the streets and takes us to a major-league marisqueria with a menu to rival any great seafood restaurant in town - all created in a stand no larger than a fishing boat. Rick enjoys the bracing blend of octopus, fish, shrimp and hot sauce known as Vuelve a la Vida ("Come Back to Life," so named because it's a popular a hangover cure). At a nearby fish market, he checks out the catch of the day from both the Pacific and Gulf coasts, and shares tips on the best choices for homemade ceviche. In Chicago, he makes a quick Frontera Ceviche, a preparation that's been a mainstay at his Frontera Grill for years. Then we're off to Fishmart, a casual Mexico City seafood place, for a taste of what just might be the next hot trend in cold seafood: aguachile. It's a classic way to serve fresh shrimp and scallops with modern minimalist appeal - simply laying them on a plate and sprinkling them with lime juice, salt and fresh jalapenos. In his home kitchen, Rick recreates his version of Shrimp en Aguachile in a matter of minutes. Then it's on to the one of Mexico City's splashiest seafood hotspots, Contramar, to see how they dress up their traditional Ceviche Especial in a strikingly modern presentation. And that inspires Rick to take us behind the scenes at his fine-dining restaurant, Topolobampo, for one last inland ceviche recipe: his inventive, surprisingly easy Herb Green Ceviche. It's a mouthwatering fishing expedition that brings home the pleasures of ceviche - even when you're nowhere near the shore.

Confessions of a Carnita-Vore (Episode #709H)

KQED Plus: Sun, May 19, 2013 -- 1:30 PM

Carnitas - chunks of pork cooked slowly in lard until they're golden and crisp on the outside and meltingly tender inside - are a weekend family tradition in Mexico. At the Medellin Market in Mexico City, Rick gives us an insider's look at how they're made every Saturday and Sunday in a huge copper cauldron, and served up with fresh corn tortillas and crispy chicharron (pork cracklings). But what if a carnitas craving strikes and you're not in Mexico on a weekend? No worries. Back in Chicago, Rick demonstrates his signature method for making fabulous carnitas right in a standard home oven. Then, thinking beyond pork, Rick shares a creative take on carnitas at the splashy seafood restaurant, Contramar, where the dish gets a deep-sea do-over with chunks of fresh-caught tuna. At his fine-dining restaurant, Topolobambo, Rick shares his own state-of-the-carnitas concept: sous vide pork (cooked very slowly in a vacuum-sealed packet) , shredded, formed into a loaf, chilled, sliced and pan-seared in a stunning modern presentation. Then, in his home kitchen, he riffs on that idea, making Duck Carnitas with Crunchy Tomatillo-Avocado Salsa, a dish inspired by the classic French duck confit technique. Instead of the traditional pork cracklings, he makes ultra-easy Crispy Cheese Chicharron, lacy cheese crisps toasted on the griddle, and takes us on a side trip to a Mexico City taqueria for a look at the dramatic, giant version of these "cheese cracklings." The elegant, yet casual, meal is served family-style with plenty of warm tortillas, so everyone can make their own succulent duck tacos.

Oaxaca's Live-Fire Cooking (Episode #902H)

KQED Life: Fri, May 17, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Everything tastes better cooked over a wood or charcoal fire - at least that's the Oaxacan credo. From soup to barbacoa, burning embers influence the flavor of Oaxaca's food in just the right ways. For starters, Rick guides us through the "taco corridor" at the 20 de Noviembre market just off the main square in Oaxaca. We can almost taste the richly-burnished chiles and onions as they grill alongside super-thinly sliced beef and pork and robust chorizo sausages. Then we see hot rocks plucked from the glowing embers and dropped into hot soup for making caldo de piedra (stone soup), a specialty from the village of San Felipe Usila.
La Capilla, a campestre (open air) restaurant, in the town of Zaachilla, has served lamb and goat barbacoa for more than 47 years. Rick's so enamored with the process of burying the chile-seasoned meat in glowing embers that he creates his own version on the backyard grill. Served with Oaxacan pasilla tomatillo salsa, there's meat, fire and smoke in every bite.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Sat, May 18, 2013 -- 9:30 AM

Triple Torta-Thon (Episode #705H)

KQED Life: Wed, May 15, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Over a breakfast of tortas - Mexican sandwiches filled, in this case, with Rick's quick Mexican scrambled eggs, beans, and avocados - Rick and his daughter, Lanie, plan an all-day torta marathon in Mexico City. Their quest beings at the city's charming Sunday flea market, Lagunilla, where they check out some simple, yet mouthwatering tortas, with a succulent filling of salt cod bacalao. Next stop: Don Polo, a gleaming 1950s-style chrome and neon diner, famous for its menu of griddled tortas. Rick and Lanie watch how they're made and try a Cubana with chorizo, pork and ham. Then it's on to El Pialadero - The Cattle Roper - for the famed Guadalajara specialty, Tortas Ahogadas, or "drowned" sandwiches, stuffed with juicy braised beef and smothered in a brothy tomato-oregano sauce. It's a treat so irresistibly messy that it's served with plastic gloves. Back in Chicago, father and daughter cook up another plan: a backyard torta party for Lanie and her friends - all prepared outdoors at the barbecue. There are Grilled Skirt Steak Tortas and Grilled Zucchini Tortas, along with an Avocado Cilantro Mayo and a Chipotle Salsa to spread on them. In his backyard vegetable patch, Rick shares tips on growing salad greens and pairing them with various kinds of dressings. Then he and Lanie prepare two salads, Mesclun with Lime-Cilantro Dressing and Boston Lettuce with Creamy Queso Anejo Dressing to round out this casual Mexican "sandwich spread."

Salsas That Cook (Episode #704H)

KQED Life: Mon, May 13, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

In their Chicago backyard, Rick and his daughter, Lanie, gather the last of the season's tomatoes to make a big batch of Salsa Mexicana, the fresh tomato salsa sometimes known as Pico de Gallo. And that's the starting point for a fast-paced salsa dance that goes way beyond tomatoes. In Mexico, salsas can be bright and fresh, dark and earthy, red or green, raw or roasted - and they're more of a condiment for food than a dip for chips. At Los Parados, a favorite Mexico City taqueria, Rick and Lanie show us the three pillars of Mexican salsa: that familiar fresh-tomato salsa Mexicana, salsa de molcajete made from roasted tomato, chile and garlic pounded in a lava-stone mortar, and red chile salsa, made by toasting, soaking and grinding dried chile de ?rbol. But that's just the beginning. At Manolo, another popular taqueria, they discover a rich, spicy, peanut salsa and a classic, creamy avocado-tomatillo salsa. And while they've got avocados in mind, they head over to the Medellin Market, where chunky guacamole is served with slow-cooked pork carnitas. Inspired by all this, they decide to make a "salsa all-stars" dinner. It starts with a batch of Roasted Tomato Salsa, which they split in half. Rick turns his half into a Salsa with Olives and Dried Fruit to be served over grilled fish, while Lanie uses her half to flavor a Bayless family favorite, a Mexican-accented Mac and Cheese. Then they make an earthy Smoky Chipotle Salsa, which they again divide into two batches. One becomes the appetizer course, to be served with chips. The other half, Rick turns into a Manolo-style Chipotle Peanut Salsa to drizzle over grilled vegetables. It all comes together at an alfresco family dinner that proves a very Mexican point: beyond chipping and dipping . .. salsas can really cook!

The Case for Quesadillas (Episode #708H)

KQED Plus: Sun, May 12, 2013 -- 1:30 PM

What could be better than a freshly made, gooey, warm quesadilla? Rick answers the question by showing us how to make the flour tortillas from scratch. What could be better than that? Well, actually, in Mexico, Rick explains, quesadillas and flour tortillas have nothing to do with each other. He takes us to the Bazar Sabado, a charming colonial-style labyrinth of handicrafts shops in the heart of Mexico City's bohemian Coyoacan district, to experience the true art of the quesadilla. In the Bazar's shady courtyard, the delicate treats are made the traditional way from freshly ground corn masa, patted onto a massive cast-iron griddle, topped with cheese and fillings and baked to a golden finish. For a more rough-and-tumble look at the same idea, we visit Lagunilla, the city's fantastical flea-market, where vendors turn out all kinds of mouthwatering quesadillas and other toasted-masa snacks on a griddle over a charcoal fire. Then it's on to Paxia, a stunning fine-dining restaurant, where Rick shows us one more style of quesadilla, a cheese-filled pocket of masa that's deep-fried to make a golden turnover. At Paxia, they serve a miniature version of these as an amuse bouche. Across town at La Merced market, Rick checks out the classic cheeses for quesadilla-making, and picks up some requeson, the Mexican version of ricotta. It's a fresh cheese and fresh cheeses are easy to prepare as Rick shows us by making Mexican Fresh Cheese in his Chicago kitchen. Then, he turns it into Luxurious Rustic Griddle-Baked Quesadillas for a romantic date-night dinner with his wife, Deann.

Oaxaca's Live-Fire Cooking (Episode #902H)

KQED 9: Sat, May 11, 2013 -- 9:30 AM

Everything tastes better cooked over a wood or charcoal fire - at least that's the Oaxacan credo. From soup to barbacoa, burning embers influence the flavor of Oaxaca's food in just the right ways. For starters, Rick guides us through the "taco corridor" at the 20 de Noviembre market just off the main square in Oaxaca. We can almost taste the richly-burnished chiles and onions as they grill alongside super-thinly sliced beef and pork and robust chorizo sausages. Then we see hot rocks plucked from the glowing embers and dropped into hot soup for making caldo de piedra (stone soup), a specialty from the village of San Felipe Usila.
La Capilla, a campestre (open air) restaurant, in the town of Zaachilla, has served lamb and goat barbacoa for more than 47 years. Rick's so enamored with the process of burying the chile-seasoned meat in glowing embers that he creates his own version on the backyard grill. Served with Oaxacan pasilla tomatillo salsa, there's meat, fire and smoke in every bite.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Sat, May 18, 2013 -- 9:30 AM

Extraordinarily Delicious Ensenada (Episode #809H)

KQED Life: Fri, May 10, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Fish tacos embody Ensenada's history in one bite: Fresh fish from pristine waters encased in crispy batter influenced by Asian immigrants, topped with Spanish-inspired creamy sauces, wrapped up in a very Mexican corn tortilla and spiked with chile. We seek out some of the best versions at Mariscos El Norteno, a stall opposite the Ensenada Fish market, and a 30-year old corner stand, Los Originales El Chopipo. No trip to Ensenada would be complete for a foodie without a stop at La Guerrerense where Sabina Bandera Gonzalez has been serving the best seafood ceviches and tostadas for more than 29 years. There Rick savors a mixed platter of shellfish and amazing sea urchin tostadas. A stop at Marco Antonio has Rick indulging in shrimp tacos with chipotle cream. Seriously good. In Chicago, Rick hosts a seafood taco party complete with the secrets to making outstanding fried fish tacos at home.

Guac on the Wild Side (Episode #703H)

KQED Life: Wed, May 8, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Everyone loves guacamole. And for every person you ask, there's a secret recipe and a preferred style. In the kitchen of his Frontera Grill, Rick prepares the restaurant's classic Mexican version, an institution since the day the place opened. But is it a classic? To answer that question, Rick goes to Mexico City, where he explains that guacamole just means "avocado sauce," and shows us a series of equally time-honored interpretations of the term. There's a smooth and creamy taco condiment at a busy taqueria and, at the other end of the sauce spectrum, a chunky guacamole made in, of all things, a meat grinder, at a market stall that sells its perfect complement: succulent, crispy pork carnitas. And speaking of texture, Rick takes us to a cool, rustic-chic restaurant near Coyoacan square for a traditional Oaxacan guacamole that gets a bit of extra protein and crunch from a surprising garnish: chile-lime toasted grasshoppers. Back in Chicago, he gives us a quick introduction to avocado types and tips at his local Mexican grocery, and then heads home with a bagful and a very cool party: a Luxury Guacamole Bar with all kinds of toppings and nibbles to make a light meal. The centerpiece is his Roasted Garlic Guacamole, and he rounds out the spread with a refreshing Crab Salpicon, a Salpicon of Roasted Poblanos and Smoked Salmon, a tangy Orange-Tomatillo Salsa that balances the richness of the guacamole, and an array of crunchy toppings from crispy bacon bits to toasted pumpkin seeds. It all comes together at an outdoor party that raises the "bar" on guacamole in a whole new way.

Chiles Rellenos: The Stuff of Passion (Episode #702H)

KQED Life: Mon, May 6, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

At the romantic San Angel Inn, a lush hacienda-turned-restaurant in Mexico City's Coyoacan District, Rick enjoys what might just be the most passion-infused food in the Mexican canon: a quintessential plate of perfect chiles rellenos. From there, we visit La Merced - the sprawling, spectacular central market that's the culinary soul of a city with 20 million mouths to feed - where chiles are bought and sold by the thousands. Americans are passionate about chiles rellenos, too. Just ask Rick's customers at Frontera Grill, where only a lucky few who line up on the street get to enjoy them each night before the supply runs out. In the Frontera kitchen, Rick offers a detailed lesson on how they're made - a labor of love that involves many carefully choreographed steps of roasting, filling and sauce prep, stuffing, battering and frying. Then it's time for a crash course in chiles at the National University of Mexico in a visit with Ricardo Munoz-Zurita, a renowned chef and food anthropologist who literally wrote the book on chiles relleno - a popular cookbook devoted to the subject - and runs a cutting-edge restaurant right on campus. The two friends share Ricardo's latest twist on chiles rellenos: an ancho stuffed with plantains. Back at home, Rick explains that chiles rellenos don't have to mean hours of prep time. And to prove it, he shares his recipe for Shrimp Chile Rellenos Grilled in Corn Husks. Next, we're off to Oh Mayahuel, an uber-cool Mexico City restaurant specializing in Mezcal flights and modern Mexican cuisine, to sample their signature stuffed chile: a dried ancho, rehydrated in a tangy escabeche sauce, stuffed with a sizzling steak taco filling and guacamole. If you're passionate about chiles rellenos, this relleno roller coaster ride will leave you feeling thrilled, surprised - and stuffed.

Tacos On Fire! (Episode #701H)

KQED Life: Fri, May 3, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

"What is a taco, anyway?" muses Rick over an upscale lobster taco at his white tablecloth restaurant, Topolobampo. "Is it crispy or soft? Grilled or griddled? Street food or taqueria fare? Fast food or fine dining?" The answer is, "all of the above ... and a whole lot more." And to prove it, Rick heads to Mexico City, for a non-stop taco trek. It starts at Fishmart, a neighborhood seafood restaurant in trendy Condesa with the lobster tacos that inspired Rick's Topolobampo version - succulent chunks of grilled lobster and black beans, wrapped in a warm corn tortilla. Following his nose, and the smell of smoldering charcoal and sizzling meat, Rick moves on to explore some taquerias - one renowned for its char-grilled tacos al carbon and another for pork tacos al pastor, made on a revolving vertical grill, gyros-style. Here too, it's all about simplicity: a few perfect mouthfuls of mind-blowing meat and super fresh tortilla. But Rick's saved his favorite underground street-food discovery for last. Super Tacos Chupacabras is hidden away under a freeway overpass. But it's so over-the-top, and the griddled tacos and slow-cooked toppings are so tasty and cheap, everyone from VIPs to bike messengers line up all day and all night. Back at home, Rick gets ready to throw his own "Supertacos" party with a little help from his friends. It's a laugh-filled, spontaneous celebration of cooking and fun, as everyone pitches in to make Tangy Tamarind Cooler and Mexican Snakebite, Tacos of Seared Scallops with Chorizo and Potatoes and Rick's easy version of Grilled Pork Tacos al Pastor, made right on the backyard grill.

Baja Beach House Cooking (Episode #813H)

KQED Life: Wed, May 1, 2013 -- 10:30 AM

Rick introduces viewers to some of Los Cabos top chefs and their restaurants then cooks dinner for them at a luxurious beach house. Margarita Carrillo, chef/owner of Don Emiliano Restaurant in San Jose del Cabo, joins Rick to purchase the local cabrillo fish and to visit Tamarindo's Farm for organically grown produce. Rick makes a tamarind chile sauce to go with his fish and eggplant course. Margarita makes her special tomatillo tart for dessert. Together they cook chocolate clams on the beach with their guests. At dinner, Rick, Margarita and the local chefs discuss the philosophy of cooking for people and the meaning of dining together.

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      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

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