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Monarchy with David Starkey Previous Broadcasts

Revolution and the Republic (Episode #106)

KQED Channel 9: Thu, Sep 21, 2006 -- 8:00 PM

Ironically when Elizabeth I died childless, the son of her great nemesis, Mary Queen of Scots, became the King of England. And so begins the line of the House of Stuart. Unfortunately the Stuarts neither liked nor understood the English Parliament. That fact along with their diffident and elitist attitudes towards the role of the monarchy contributed to the greatest crisis the Crown has ever known - the execution of a King. Revolution and the Republic sheds light on the death of Charles I, the English Civil War, the reign of the Lord Protector, Oliver Cromwell and the eventual Restoration of the Monarchy by Charles II in 1660.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sun, Sep 24, 2006 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 22, 2006 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 22, 2006 -- 3:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 22, 2006 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 22, 2006 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 22, 2006 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Sep 21, 2006 -- 11:00 PM

A Question of Succession (Episode #105)

KQED Life: Sun, Sep 17, 2006 -- 6:00 PM

This episode chronicles the question of the Tudor Succession. Henry VIII had reigned for almost 40 years. In that time he had six wives - two divorces and two executions - resulting in three children. His impact on the nation and on the monarchy was indelible, but could the Tudor dynasty survive? In Henry's will, all three of his children were named as his heirs and, in fact, all three would wear the Crown. His son Edward's reign was tragically brief, daughter Mary's sadly cruel, but his last heir, Elizabeth would rule magnificently.

The Imperial King (Episode #104)

KQED Life: Sun, Sep 17, 2006 -- 5:00 PM

Henry VIII was not supposed to rule England. His older brother Arthur was first in line but when Arthur died, Henry became the heir. He was crowned at 17 - a young, handsome and romantic figure. Fired up with the idealism of youth, Henry had strong ideas about kingship and he grew into a resolute and powerful man who cemented the Tudor's right to rule as Kings of England. Though he brought the monarchy to the pinnacle of its power, he allowed his personal desires to rule his political agenda - a move that would change England and the monarchy forever.

A Question of Succession (Episode #105)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 7:55 PM

This episode chronicles the question of the Tudor Succession. Henry VIII had reigned for almost 40 years. In that time he had six wives - two divorces and two executions - resulting in three children. His impact on the nation and on the monarchy was indelible, but could the Tudor dynasty survive? In Henry's will, all three of his children were named as his heirs and, in fact, all three would wear the Crown. His son Edward's reign was tragically brief, daughter Mary's sadly cruel, but his last heir, Elizabeth would rule magnificently.

The Imperial King (Episode #104)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 7:00 PM

Henry VIII was not supposed to rule England. His older brother Arthur was first in line but when Arthur died, Henry became the heir. He was crowned at 17 - a young, handsome and romantic figure. Fired up with the idealism of youth, Henry had strong ideas about kingship and he grew into a resolute and powerful man who cemented the Tudor's right to rule as Kings of England. Though he brought the monarchy to the pinnacle of its power, he allowed his personal desires to rule his political agenda - a move that would change England and the monarchy forever.

A Question of Succession (Episode #105)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 3:55 PM

This episode chronicles the question of the Tudor Succession. Henry VIII had reigned for almost 40 years. In that time he had six wives - two divorces and two executions - resulting in three children. His impact on the nation and on the monarchy was indelible, but could the Tudor dynasty survive? In Henry's will, all three of his children were named as his heirs and, in fact, all three would wear the Crown. His son Edward's reign was tragically brief, daughter Mary's sadly cruel, but his last heir, Elizabeth would rule magnificently.

The Imperial King (Episode #104)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 3:00 PM

Henry VIII was not supposed to rule England. His older brother Arthur was first in line but when Arthur died, Henry became the heir. He was crowned at 17 - a young, handsome and romantic figure. Fired up with the idealism of youth, Henry had strong ideas about kingship and he grew into a resolute and powerful man who cemented the Tudor's right to rule as Kings of England. Though he brought the monarchy to the pinnacle of its power, he allowed his personal desires to rule his political agenda - a move that would change England and the monarchy forever.

A Question of Succession (Episode #105)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 11:55 AM

This episode chronicles the question of the Tudor Succession. Henry VIII had reigned for almost 40 years. In that time he had six wives - two divorces and two executions - resulting in three children. His impact on the nation and on the monarchy was indelible, but could the Tudor dynasty survive? In Henry's will, all three of his children were named as his heirs and, in fact, all three would wear the Crown. His son Edward's reign was tragically brief, daughter Mary's sadly cruel, but his last heir, Elizabeth would rule magnificently.

The Imperial King (Episode #104)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 11:00 AM

Henry VIII was not supposed to rule England. His older brother Arthur was first in line but when Arthur died, Henry became the heir. He was crowned at 17 - a young, handsome and romantic figure. Fired up with the idealism of youth, Henry had strong ideas about kingship and he grew into a resolute and powerful man who cemented the Tudor's right to rule as Kings of England. Though he brought the monarchy to the pinnacle of its power, he allowed his personal desires to rule his political agenda - a move that would change England and the monarchy forever.

A Question of Succession (Episode #105)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 7:55 AM

This episode chronicles the question of the Tudor Succession. Henry VIII had reigned for almost 40 years. In that time he had six wives - two divorces and two executions - resulting in three children. His impact on the nation and on the monarchy was indelible, but could the Tudor dynasty survive? In Henry's will, all three of his children were named as his heirs and, in fact, all three would wear the Crown. His son Edward's reign was tragically brief, daughter Mary's sadly cruel, but his last heir, Elizabeth would rule magnificently.

The Imperial King (Episode #104)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 7:00 AM

Henry VIII was not supposed to rule England. His older brother Arthur was first in line but when Arthur died, Henry became the heir. He was crowned at 17 - a young, handsome and romantic figure. Fired up with the idealism of youth, Henry had strong ideas about kingship and he grew into a resolute and powerful man who cemented the Tudor's right to rule as Kings of England. Though he brought the monarchy to the pinnacle of its power, he allowed his personal desires to rule his political agenda - a move that would change England and the monarchy forever.

A Question of Succession (Episode #105)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 3:55 AM

This episode chronicles the question of the Tudor Succession. Henry VIII had reigned for almost 40 years. In that time he had six wives - two divorces and two executions - resulting in three children. His impact on the nation and on the monarchy was indelible, but could the Tudor dynasty survive? In Henry's will, all three of his children were named as his heirs and, in fact, all three would wear the Crown. His son Edward's reign was tragically brief, daughter Mary's sadly cruel, but his last heir, Elizabeth would rule magnificently.

The Imperial King (Episode #104)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 15, 2006 -- 3:00 AM

Henry VIII was not supposed to rule England. His older brother Arthur was first in line but when Arthur died, Henry became the heir. He was crowned at 17 - a young, handsome and romantic figure. Fired up with the idealism of youth, Henry had strong ideas about kingship and he grew into a resolute and powerful man who cemented the Tudor's right to rule as Kings of England. Though he brought the monarchy to the pinnacle of its power, he allowed his personal desires to rule his political agenda - a move that would change England and the monarchy forever.

A Question of Succession (Episode #105)

KQED Life: Thu, Sep 14, 2006 -- 11:55 PM

This episode chronicles the question of the Tudor Succession. Henry VIII had reigned for almost 40 years. In that time he had six wives - two divorces and two executions - resulting in three children. His impact on the nation and on the monarchy was indelible, but could the Tudor dynasty survive? In Henry's will, all three of his children were named as his heirs and, in fact, all three would wear the Crown. His son Edward's reign was tragically brief, daughter Mary's sadly cruel, but his last heir, Elizabeth would rule magnificently.

The Imperial King (Episode #104)

KQED Life: Thu, Sep 14, 2006 -- 11:00 PM

Henry VIII was not supposed to rule England. His older brother Arthur was first in line but when Arthur died, Henry became the heir. He was crowned at 17 - a young, handsome and romantic figure. Fired up with the idealism of youth, Henry had strong ideas about kingship and he grew into a resolute and powerful man who cemented the Tudor's right to rule as Kings of England. Though he brought the monarchy to the pinnacle of its power, he allowed his personal desires to rule his political agenda - a move that would change England and the monarchy forever.

A Question of Succession (Episode #105)

KQED Channel 9: Thu, Sep 14, 2006 -- 8:55 PM

This episode chronicles the question of the Tudor Succession. Henry VIII had reigned for almost 40 years. In that time he had six wives - two divorces and two executions - resulting in three children. His impact on the nation and on the monarchy was indelible, but could the Tudor dynasty survive? In Henry's will, all three of his children were named as his heirs and, in fact, all three would wear the Crown. His son Edward's reign was tragically brief, daughter Mary's sadly cruel, but his last heir, Elizabeth would rule magnificently.

The Imperial King (Episode #104)

KQED Channel 9: Thu, Sep 14, 2006 -- 8:00 PM

Henry VIII was not supposed to rule England. His older brother Arthur was first in line but when Arthur died, Henry became the heir. He was crowned at 17 - a young, handsome and romantic figure. Fired up with the idealism of youth, Henry had strong ideas about kingship and he grew into a resolute and powerful man who cemented the Tudor's right to rule as Kings of England. Though he brought the monarchy to the pinnacle of its power, he allowed his personal desires to rule his political agenda - a move that would change England and the monarchy forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Life: Sun, Sep 10, 2006 -- 6:00 PM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Life: Sun, Sep 10, 2006 -- 5:00 PM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Life: Sun, Sep 10, 2006 -- 4:00 PM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Life: Sun, Sep 10, 2006 -- 8:00 AM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Life: Sun, Sep 10, 2006 -- 7:00 AM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Life: Sun, Sep 10, 2006 -- 6:00 AM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED World: Sat, Sep 9, 2006 -- 4:00 PM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED World: Sat, Sep 9, 2006 -- 3:00 PM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED World: Sat, Sep 9, 2006 -- 2:00 PM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 9:00 PM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 8:00 PM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 7:00 PM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 5:00 PM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 4:00 PM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 3:00 PM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 1:00 PM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 12:00 PM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 11:00 AM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 9:00 AM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 8:00 AM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 7:00 AM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 5:00 AM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 4:00 AM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 3:00 AM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 1:00 AM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Life: Fri, Sep 8, 2006 -- 12:00 AM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Life: Thu, Sep 7, 2006 -- 11:00 PM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

A New Dynasty (Episode #103)

KQED Channel 9: Thu, Sep 7, 2006 -- 10:00 PM

Henry VI inherits two Crowns - that of England and of France - at the tender age of 9 months old. But unlike his warrior father, Henry V, this Henry was weak and actually went mad. As happens when a King can't govern, there are those eager and willing to take their place. Richard, Duke of York, was one such candidate - he made a bid for the throne and so began a 30 year struggle for power known as the Wars of the Roses. During this turbulent time, the Crown changed hands back and forth as two powerful families vied for power. In the end, a remote claimant seized the Crown and a new dynasty, the Tudor dynasty, was born.

Medieval Monarchs (Episode #102)

KQED Channel 9: Thu, Sep 7, 2006 -- 9:00 PM

King Henry II of England was a medieval superstar. His family saga is legendary - Henry was the husband of Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of both Richard the Lionheart and King John (who was forced to sign the Magna Carta.) Henry II's story includes the bitter tale of friendship and betrayal with Archbishop Thomas Becket, ending with the famous Murder in the Cathedral. Henry's line extended through to Edward I (also know as the Hammer of the Scots) and Edward III - the King who established heraldry in England and the real stories behind Shakespeare's Kings.

The Early Kings (Episode #101)

KQED Channel 9: Thu, Sep 7, 2006 -- 8:00 PM

The story begins in the violent and chaotic dark ages. There, in a legendary world filled with dragons and monsters, a uniquely English idea of monarchy emerged. Great Kings like Alfred the Great and Canute the Viking unified the country and established the rites and rituals of kingship. Eventually the invasion of 1066 by William of Normandy, also known as William the Conqueror, radically changed the direction of the country and its form of kingship forever.

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