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American Masters Previous Broadcasts

Philip Roth: Unmasked (Episode #2603H)

KQED 9: Fri, Mar 29, 2013 -- 10:00 PM

Often referred to as the greatest living American writer, Philip Roth's 31st novel - and 4th film made from one of his novels-- is due to appear in 2013. "Goodbye Columbus," the collection of short stories published in 1959, put the 26-year old Roth on the map and "Portnoy's Complaint," 10 years later, propelled him into a scandalous spotlight. Yet he steadily earned the reputation as a man of letters, commanding ownership of the Jewish-American novel and making Newark, NJ a literary destination. He practically invented the genre of factual/fictional autobiography - his thinly-veiled "Zuckerman Trilogy" follows the protagonist's path from aspiring young writer to compromised celebrity. His career was considered dead by 1990 - and then exploded with a dozen best sellers in the past two decades. This film bears out Roth's promise to the director: "we'll speak of everything: women, rabbis, politicians, psycho-analysis, literary critics and me."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Mar 31, 2013 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Sat, Mar 30, 2013 -- 4:00 AM

Joan Baez: How Sweet the Sound (Episode #2206X)

KQED Life: Sun, Mar 24, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

Told from her perspective, and supported by a rich performance and historical archive, the centerpiece of this film is Baez' many years as a musician, her power as an artist, those who influenced her and those she influenced. From her earliest recordings, Baez introduced ever wider audiences to the songs of Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Phil Ochs, Johnny Cash and, of course, Bob Dylan -- before she began writing her own music. Follow Baez through her story, to see her as she sees herself: human being -- first, pacifist -- second, and folk-singer -- third.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Mon, Mar 25, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Neil Young: Don't Be Denied (Episode #2203)

KQED World: Thu, Mar 21, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Neil Young grants rare and unprecedented access for this documentary in which he traces his musical journey in his own words. The film includes new interviews shot in New York and California and utilizes previously unseen performance footage from the star's own extensive archives. It also features cohorts Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, David Crosby, Nils Lofgren and James Taylor. From his first success with Buffalo Springfield to the bi-polar opposites of mega-stardom with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and the soulful rock of Crazy Horse, Young's career has enjoyed many guises. The film takes Young through his rise in the '60's, his solo artist period in the '70's, his '80's embrace of the New Wave, and it ends with Young still refusing to be denied, pursuing a more eclectic musical approach but also touring in the USA with Crosby Stills Nash & Young and teaming on occasion with Crazy Horse.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 21, 2013 -- 8:00 AM

Cab Calloway: Sketches (Episode #2502)

KQED World: Wed, Mar 20, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

"Hi de hi de hi de ho," the popular refrain from "Minnie the Moocher" was Cab Calloway's signature song and Harlem's famous Cotton Club was his home stage. A singer, dancer and band leader, Calloway was an exceptional figure in the history of jazz -- a consummate musician, he charmed audiences across the world with boundless energy, bravado and elegant showmanship. His back glide dance step is the precursor to Michael Jackson's moonwalk and his scatting lyrics find their legacy in today's hip-hop and rap. An ambassador for his race, Calloway was the first black musician to tour the segregationist South, as early as 1932. At the top of his game in the jazz and swing eras of the 30s and 40s, he toured as Sportin' Life in Porgy and Bess, forever putting his personal stamp on "It Ain't Necessarily So." His career flagged until he was rediscovered in the 1980s Blues Brothers and even on Sesame Street, becoming a new cult hero of sorts.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Mar 20, 2013 -- 8:00 AM

Harper Lee: Hey Boo (Episode #2504()

KQED Life: Tue, Mar 19, 2013 -- 3:30 AM

Reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" has been a national pastime for five decades - it is still selling nearly a million copies a year, its classic popularity and power are a common reference. And the courtroom image of Gregory Peck, as the passionate Atticus Finch, gave us an enduring picture for the novel's message. Behind it all was a young Southern girl named Nelle Harper Lee, who once said she wanted to be Alabama's Jane Austen.
This program explores her life and unravels its mysteries, particularly why she never published again. Illuminated with family photos, revealing personal letters and an exclusive interview with her sister, Alice Finch Lee (100 years old), the film is steeped in the texture of the novel's Deep South and the social changes it inspired. Tom Brokaw, Rosanne Cash, Anna Quindlen, Scott Turow, Oprah Winfrey and Andrew Young reflect on how "Mockingbird" shaped their lives.

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel (Episode #2503)

KQED Life: Tue, Mar 19, 2013 -- 2:30 AM

No ordinary writer and no ordinary woman -- "Gone with the Wind" created two of the world's greatest lovers, Scarlett and Rhett, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and has sold more than 30 million copies. Born into Atlanta's upper crust in 1900, Margaret Mitchell challenged stifling social restrictions at every turn. A charismatic force to be reckoned with, she had a great sense of humor, was one of Georgia's first newspaper women and was extremely generous with the money she made from "Gone with the Wind." She struggled with the changing role of women and the liberation of African Americans but also suffered from lifelong bouts of depression, until a tragic accident lead to her death in 1949. This film examines the amazing endurance of "Gone with the Wind" and reveals the seminal events of Mitchell's life through dramatic re-enactments based on her letters, as scenes from the movie weave together her life and her work.

Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women (Episode #2207)

KQED Life: Tue, Mar 19, 2013 -- 1:00 AM

The author of Little Women is an almost universally recognized name. Her reputation as a morally upstanding New England spinster, reflecting the conventional propriety of late 19th-century Concord, is firmly established. However, raised among reformers and Transcendentalists and skeptics, the intellectual protege of Emerson and Hawthorne and Thoreau, Alcott was actually a free thinker with democratic ideals and progressive values about women -- a worldly careerist of sorts. Most surprising is that she led, under the pseudonym A.M. Barnard, a literary double life, undiscovered until the 1940s. As Barnard, Alcott penned scandalous, sensational works with characters running the gamut from murderers and revolutionaries to cross-dressers and opium addicts -- a far cry from her familiar fatherly mentors, courageous mothers and appropriately impish children.

Harper Lee: Hey Boo (Episode #2504()

KQED Life: Mon, Mar 18, 2013 -- 9:30 PM

Reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" has been a national pastime for five decades - it is still selling nearly a million copies a year, its classic popularity and power are a common reference. And the courtroom image of Gregory Peck, as the passionate Atticus Finch, gave us an enduring picture for the novel's message. Behind it all was a young Southern girl named Nelle Harper Lee, who once said she wanted to be Alabama's Jane Austen.
This program explores her life and unravels its mysteries, particularly why she never published again. Illuminated with family photos, revealing personal letters and an exclusive interview with her sister, Alice Finch Lee (100 years old), the film is steeped in the texture of the novel's Deep South and the social changes it inspired. Tom Brokaw, Rosanne Cash, Anna Quindlen, Scott Turow, Oprah Winfrey and Andrew Young reflect on how "Mockingbird" shaped their lives.

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel (Episode #2503)

KQED Life: Mon, Mar 18, 2013 -- 8:30 PM

No ordinary writer and no ordinary woman -- "Gone with the Wind" created two of the world's greatest lovers, Scarlett and Rhett, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and has sold more than 30 million copies. Born into Atlanta's upper crust in 1900, Margaret Mitchell challenged stifling social restrictions at every turn. A charismatic force to be reckoned with, she had a great sense of humor, was one of Georgia's first newspaper women and was extremely generous with the money she made from "Gone with the Wind." She struggled with the changing role of women and the liberation of African Americans but also suffered from lifelong bouts of depression, until a tragic accident lead to her death in 1949. This film examines the amazing endurance of "Gone with the Wind" and reveals the seminal events of Mitchell's life through dramatic re-enactments based on her letters, as scenes from the movie weave together her life and her work.

Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women (Episode #2207)

KQED Life: Mon, Mar 18, 2013 -- 7:00 PM

The author of Little Women is an almost universally recognized name. Her reputation as a morally upstanding New England spinster, reflecting the conventional propriety of late 19th-century Concord, is firmly established. However, raised among reformers and Transcendentalists and skeptics, the intellectual protege of Emerson and Hawthorne and Thoreau, Alcott was actually a free thinker with democratic ideals and progressive values about women -- a worldly careerist of sorts. Most surprising is that she led, under the pseudonym A.M. Barnard, a literary double life, undiscovered until the 1940s. As Barnard, Alcott penned scandalous, sensational works with characters running the gamut from murderers and revolutionaries to cross-dressers and opium addicts -- a far cry from her familiar fatherly mentors, courageous mothers and appropriately impish children.

Joan Baez: How Sweet the Sound (Episode #2206X)

KQED World: Mon, Mar 18, 2013 -- 12:30 PM

Told from her perspective, and supported by a rich performance and historical archive, the centerpiece of this film is Baez' many years as a musician, her power as an artist, those who influenced her and those she influenced. From her earliest recordings, Baez introduced ever wider audiences to the songs of Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Phil Ochs, Johnny Cash and, of course, Bob Dylan -- before she began writing her own music. Follow Baez through her story, to see her as she sees herself: human being -- first, pacifist -- second, and folk-singer -- third.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Mon, Mar 25, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune (Episode #2501)

KQED World: Mon, Mar 18, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

One of the most politically active singer-songwriters to emerge in the 1960's anti-Vietnam War era, Phil Ochs was inspired by Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, but also by Elvis Presley and John Wayne. He was a journalism student in college, which, perhaps, informed the extent of his protest lyrics -- always witty, topical and insightful, always slightly haunting -- such songs as I Ain't Marching Anymore, Love Me I'm a Liberal, Outside of a Small Circle of Friends, Power and the Glory, The War Is Over, and There But for Fortune, famously covered by Joan Baez -- are inseparable from those times. Ochs was vocal and visible, at political rallies, the Newport Folk Festival and the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. A cohort of Bob Dylan's and Abbie Hoffman's, his ultimate disillusionment with the government and several of his heroes -- and a familial tendency to bi-polar disease -- led to his tragic suicide in April 1976.

Joan Baez: How Sweet the Sound (Episode #2206X)

KQED World: Mon, Mar 18, 2013 -- 6:30 AM

Told from her perspective, and supported by a rich performance and historical archive, the centerpiece of this film is Baez' many years as a musician, her power as an artist, those who influenced her and those she influenced. From her earliest recordings, Baez introduced ever wider audiences to the songs of Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Phil Ochs, Johnny Cash and, of course, Bob Dylan -- before she began writing her own music. Follow Baez through her story, to see her as she sees herself: human being -- first, pacifist -- second, and folk-singer -- third.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Mon, Mar 25, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune (Episode #2501)

KQED World: Mon, Mar 18, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

One of the most politically active singer-songwriters to emerge in the 1960's anti-Vietnam War era, Phil Ochs was inspired by Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, but also by Elvis Presley and John Wayne. He was a journalism student in college, which, perhaps, informed the extent of his protest lyrics -- always witty, topical and insightful, always slightly haunting -- such songs as I Ain't Marching Anymore, Love Me I'm a Liberal, Outside of a Small Circle of Friends, Power and the Glory, The War Is Over, and There But for Fortune, famously covered by Joan Baez -- are inseparable from those times. Ochs was vocal and visible, at political rallies, the Newport Folk Festival and the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. A cohort of Bob Dylan's and Abbie Hoffman's, his ultimate disillusionment with the government and several of his heroes -- and a familial tendency to bi-polar disease -- led to his tragic suicide in April 1976.

Cab Calloway: Sketches (Episode #2502)

KQED World: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 -- 1:00 AM

"Hi de hi de hi de ho," the popular refrain from "Minnie the Moocher" was Cab Calloway's signature song and Harlem's famous Cotton Club was his home stage. A singer, dancer and band leader, Calloway was an exceptional figure in the history of jazz -- a consummate musician, he charmed audiences across the world with boundless energy, bravado and elegant showmanship. His back glide dance step is the precursor to Michael Jackson's moonwalk and his scatting lyrics find their legacy in today's hip-hop and rap. An ambassador for his race, Calloway was the first black musician to tour the segregationist South, as early as 1932. At the top of his game in the jazz and swing eras of the 30s and 40s, he toured as Sportin' Life in Porgy and Bess, forever putting his personal stamp on "It Ain't Necessarily So." His career flagged until he was rediscovered in the 1980s Blues Brothers and even on Sesame Street, becoming a new cult hero of sorts.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Mar 20, 2013 -- 8:00 AM

Neil Young: Don't Be Denied (Episode #2203)

KQED World: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 -- 12:00 AM

Neil Young grants rare and unprecedented access for this documentary in which he traces his musical journey in his own words. The film includes new interviews shot in New York and California and utilizes previously unseen performance footage from the star's own extensive archives. It also features cohorts Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, David Crosby, Nils Lofgren and James Taylor. From his first success with Buffalo Springfield to the bi-polar opposites of mega-stardom with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and the soulful rock of Crazy Horse, Young's career has enjoyed many guises. The film takes Young through his rise in the '60's, his solo artist period in the '70's, his '80's embrace of the New Wave, and it ends with Young still refusing to be denied, pursuing a more eclectic musical approach but also touring in the USA with Crosby Stills Nash & Young and teaming on occasion with Crazy Horse.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 21, 2013 -- 8:00 AM

Harper Lee: Hey Boo (Episode #2504()

KQED 9: Wed, Mar 13, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" has been a national pastime for five decades - it is still selling nearly a million copies a year, its classic popularity and power are a common reference. And the courtroom image of Gregory Peck, as the passionate Atticus Finch, gave us an enduring picture for the novel's message. Behind it all was a young Southern girl named Nelle Harper Lee, who once said she wanted to be Alabama's Jane Austen.
This program explores her life and unravels its mysteries, particularly why she never published again. Illuminated with family photos, revealing personal letters and an exclusive interview with her sister, Alice Finch Lee (100 years old), the film is steeped in the texture of the novel's Deep South and the social changes it inspired. Tom Brokaw, Rosanne Cash, Anna Quindlen, Scott Turow, Oprah Winfrey and Andrew Young reflect on how "Mockingbird" shaped their lives.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sat, Mar 16, 2013 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sat, Mar 16, 2013 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Mar 14, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Mar 14, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Wed, Mar 13, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel (Episode #2503)

KQED World: Mon, Mar 11, 2013 -- 1:00 PM

No ordinary writer and no ordinary woman -- "Gone with the Wind" created two of the world's greatest lovers, Scarlett and Rhett, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and has sold more than 30 million copies. Born into Atlanta's upper crust in 1900, Margaret Mitchell challenged stifling social restrictions at every turn. A charismatic force to be reckoned with, she had a great sense of humor, was one of Georgia's first newspaper women and was extremely generous with the money she made from "Gone with the Wind." She struggled with the changing role of women and the liberation of African Americans but also suffered from lifelong bouts of depression, until a tragic accident lead to her death in 1949. This film examines the amazing endurance of "Gone with the Wind" and reveals the seminal events of Mitchell's life through dramatic re-enactments based on her letters, as scenes from the movie weave together her life and her work.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Mar 13, 2013 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Mar 13, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Harper Lee: Hey Boo (Episode #2504()

KQED World: Mon, Mar 11, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

Reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" has been a national pastime for five decades - it is still selling nearly a million copies a year, its classic popularity and power are a common reference. And the courtroom image of Gregory Peck, as the passionate Atticus Finch, gave us an enduring picture for the novel's message. Behind it all was a young Southern girl named Nelle Harper Lee, who once said she wanted to be Alabama's Jane Austen.
This program explores her life and unravels its mysteries, particularly why she never published again. Illuminated with family photos, revealing personal letters and an exclusive interview with her sister, Alice Finch Lee (100 years old), the film is steeped in the texture of the novel's Deep South and the social changes it inspired. Tom Brokaw, Rosanne Cash, Anna Quindlen, Scott Turow, Oprah Winfrey and Andrew Young reflect on how "Mockingbird" shaped their lives.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sat, Mar 16, 2013 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sat, Mar 16, 2013 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Mar 14, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Mar 14, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Wed, Mar 13, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel (Episode #2503)

KQED World: Mon, Mar 11, 2013 -- 7:00 AM

No ordinary writer and no ordinary woman -- "Gone with the Wind" created two of the world's greatest lovers, Scarlett and Rhett, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and has sold more than 30 million copies. Born into Atlanta's upper crust in 1900, Margaret Mitchell challenged stifling social restrictions at every turn. A charismatic force to be reckoned with, she had a great sense of humor, was one of Georgia's first newspaper women and was extremely generous with the money she made from "Gone with the Wind." She struggled with the changing role of women and the liberation of African Americans but also suffered from lifelong bouts of depression, until a tragic accident lead to her death in 1949. This film examines the amazing endurance of "Gone with the Wind" and reveals the seminal events of Mitchell's life through dramatic re-enactments based on her letters, as scenes from the movie weave together her life and her work.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Mar 13, 2013 -- 8:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Mar 13, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Harper Lee: Hey Boo (Episode #2504()

KQED World: Mon, Mar 11, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

Reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" has been a national pastime for five decades - it is still selling nearly a million copies a year, its classic popularity and power are a common reference. And the courtroom image of Gregory Peck, as the passionate Atticus Finch, gave us an enduring picture for the novel's message. Behind it all was a young Southern girl named Nelle Harper Lee, who once said she wanted to be Alabama's Jane Austen.
This program explores her life and unravels its mysteries, particularly why she never published again. Illuminated with family photos, revealing personal letters and an exclusive interview with her sister, Alice Finch Lee (100 years old), the film is steeped in the texture of the novel's Deep South and the social changes it inspired. Tom Brokaw, Rosanne Cash, Anna Quindlen, Scott Turow, Oprah Winfrey and Andrew Young reflect on how "Mockingbird" shaped their lives.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sat, Mar 16, 2013 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sat, Mar 16, 2013 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Mar 14, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Mar 14, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Wed, Mar 13, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Sister Rosetta Tharpe: The Godmother of Rock & Roll (Episode #2602H)

KQED World: Mon, Mar 4, 2013 -- 1:00 AM

During the 1940s, 50s and 60s, Southern-born, Chicago-raised and New York-made Sister Rosetta Tharpe introduced the spiritual passion of her gospel music into the secular world of popular rock 'n roll, inspiring the male icons of the genre. This flamboyant African-American gospel superstar, with her spectacular virtuosity on the newly electrified guitar, was a natural-born performer and a rebel - one of the most important singer-musicians of the 20th century. She is acknowledged as a major influence not only on generations of black musicians - including Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Isaac Hayes and Etta James - but also on white stars such as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash.

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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