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American Masters Previous Broadcasts

Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune (Episode #2501)

KQED Plus: Wed, Nov 14, 2012 -- 4:30 AM

One of the most politically active singer-songwriters to emerge in the 1960's anti-Vietnam War era, Phil Ochs was inspired by Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, but also by Elvis Presley and John Wayne. He was a journalism student in college, which, perhaps, informed the extent of his protest lyrics -- always witty, topical and insightful, always slightly haunting -- such songs as I Ain't Marching Anymore, Love Me I'm a Liberal, Outside of a Small Circle of Friends, Power and the Glory, The War Is Over, and There But for Fortune, famously covered by Joan Baez -- are inseparable from those times. Ochs was vocal and visible, at political rallies, the Newport Folk Festival and the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. A cohort of Bob Dylan's and Abbie Hoffman's, his ultimate disillusionment with the government and several of his heroes -- and a familial tendency to bi-polar disease -- led to his tragic suicide in April 1976.

Woody Guthrie: Ain't Got No Home (Episode #1903Z)

KQED Plus: Wed, Nov 14, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

Essentially every American who has listened to the radio, or gone to summer camp, knows Woody's This Land is Your Land. The nation's signature folk singer/song-writer, Woody's music has been recorded by everyone from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir to the Irish rock band U2. Originally blowing out of the Dust Bowl in 1930s Depression Era America, he blended vernacular, rural music and populism to give voice to millions of downtrodden citizens. Woody's prolific music, poetry and prose were politically leftist, uniquely patriotic, and always inspirational. He joined music with traditional oral history and was central to generations of folk music revival. His is a complex story filled with frenetic creative energy and a treasure trove of cultural history, as well as personal imperfections and profound family tragedy.

Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune (Episode #2501)

KQED Plus: Tue, Nov 13, 2012 -- 10:30 PM

One of the most politically active singer-songwriters to emerge in the 1960's anti-Vietnam War era, Phil Ochs was inspired by Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, but also by Elvis Presley and John Wayne. He was a journalism student in college, which, perhaps, informed the extent of his protest lyrics -- always witty, topical and insightful, always slightly haunting -- such songs as I Ain't Marching Anymore, Love Me I'm a Liberal, Outside of a Small Circle of Friends, Power and the Glory, The War Is Over, and There But for Fortune, famously covered by Joan Baez -- are inseparable from those times. Ochs was vocal and visible, at political rallies, the Newport Folk Festival and the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. A cohort of Bob Dylan's and Abbie Hoffman's, his ultimate disillusionment with the government and several of his heroes -- and a familial tendency to bi-polar disease -- led to his tragic suicide in April 1976.

Woody Guthrie: Ain't Got No Home (Episode #1903Z)

KQED Plus: Tue, Nov 13, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

Essentially every American who has listened to the radio, or gone to summer camp, knows Woody's This Land is Your Land. The nation's signature folk singer/song-writer, Woody's music has been recorded by everyone from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir to the Irish rock band U2. Originally blowing out of the Dust Bowl in 1930s Depression Era America, he blended vernacular, rural music and populism to give voice to millions of downtrodden citizens. Woody's prolific music, poetry and prose were politically leftist, uniquely patriotic, and always inspirational. He joined music with traditional oral history and was central to generations of folk music revival. His is a complex story filled with frenetic creative energy and a treasure trove of cultural history, as well as personal imperfections and profound family tragedy.

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • early Thurs 9/29 1am-6am: planned KQET/DT25 outage

      (DT25-1 through DT25-3) Late Wed/early Thurs 9/29 1am, the KQET DT25 transmitter will be turned off for maintenance and electrical upgrades. The plan is that the signal should be restored at approximately 6am. Most Over the Air TVs will automatically restore the signal once the transmitter is turned back on. However, a few viewers may […]

    • early Mon 9/26: planned KQEH/DT54 Over the Air outage

      UPDATE: This morning’s maintenance took place at 8:36am, with the signal restored at 8:45am. (DT54-1 through DT54-5) At some point early Monday morning Sept 26th (before 9am), the KQEH transmitter will be turned off for about 10 minutes for maintenance. Because of the short duration, most TVs will automatically restore the signal once the transmitter […]

    • early Tues 9/13: KQEH DT54 (KQED Plus) planned overnight outage

      UPDATE: power was restored at 6:45am Tuesday. Most TVs will restore the channels automatically, but a few viewers may need to do a rescan. – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – (DT54-1 through 54-5) late Monday/early Tuesday 9/13 The DT54 Over the Air signal will be […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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