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American Masters Previous Broadcasts

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel (Episode #2503)

KQED Plus: Thu, Oct 4, 2012 -- 7:00 PM

No ordinary writer and no ordinary woman -- "Gone with the Wind" created two of the world's greatest lovers, Scarlett and Rhett, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and has sold more than 30 million copies. Born into Atlanta's upper crust in 1900, Margaret Mitchell challenged stifling social restrictions at every turn. A charismatic force to be reckoned with, she had a great sense of humor, was one of Georgia's first newspaper women and was extremely generous with the money she made from "Gone with the Wind." She struggled with the changing role of women and the liberation of African Americans but also suffered from lifelong bouts of depression, until a tragic accident lead to her death in 1949. This film examines the amazing endurance of "Gone with the Wind" and reveals the seminal events of Mitchell's life through dramatic re-enactments based on her letters, as scenes from the movie weave together her life and her work.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Fri, Oct 5, 2012 -- 1:00 AM

Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women (Episode #2207)

KQED Plus: Tue, Oct 2, 2012 -- 4:30 AM

The author of Little Women is an almost universally recognized name. Her reputation as a morally upstanding New England spinster, reflecting the conventional propriety of late 19th-century Concord, is firmly established. However, raised among reformers and Transcendentalists and skeptics, the intellectual protege of Emerson and Hawthorne and Thoreau, Alcott was actually a free thinker with democratic ideals and progressive values about women -- a worldly careerist of sorts. Most surprising is that she led, under the pseudonym A.M. Barnard, a literary double life, undiscovered until the 1940s. As Barnard, Alcott penned scandalous, sensational works with characters running the gamut from murderers and revolutionaries to cross-dressers and opium addicts -- a far cry from her familiar fatherly mentors, courageous mothers and appropriately impish children.

Harper Lee: American Masters (Episode #2504H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Oct 2, 2012 -- 3:00 AM

Reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" has been a national pastime for five decades - it is still selling nearly a million copies a year, its classic popularity and power are a common reference. And the courtroom image of Gregory Peck, as the passionate Atticus Finch, gave us an enduring picture for the novel's message. Behind it all was a young Southern girl named Nelle Harper Lee, who once said she wanted to be Alabama's Jane Austen.
This program explores her life and unravels its mysteries, particularly why she never published again. Illuminated with family photos, revealing personal letters and an exclusive interview with her sister, Alice Finch Lee (100 years old), the film is steeped in the texture of the novel's Deep South and the social changes it inspired. Tom Brokaw, Rosanne Cash, Anna Quindlen, Scott Turow, Oprah Winfrey and Andrew Young reflect on how "Mockingbird" shaped their lives.

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel (Episode #2503)

KQED Plus: Tue, Oct 2, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

No ordinary writer and no ordinary woman -- "Gone with the Wind" created two of the world's greatest lovers, Scarlett and Rhett, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and has sold more than 30 million copies. Born into Atlanta's upper crust in 1900, Margaret Mitchell challenged stifling social restrictions at every turn. A charismatic force to be reckoned with, she had a great sense of humor, was one of Georgia's first newspaper women and was extremely generous with the money she made from "Gone with the Wind." She struggled with the changing role of women and the liberation of African Americans but also suffered from lifelong bouts of depression, until a tragic accident lead to her death in 1949. This film examines the amazing endurance of "Gone with the Wind" and reveals the seminal events of Mitchell's life through dramatic re-enactments based on her letters, as scenes from the movie weave together her life and her work.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Fri, Oct 5, 2012 -- 1:00 AM

Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women (Episode #2207)

KQED Plus: Mon, Oct 1, 2012 -- 10:30 PM

The author of Little Women is an almost universally recognized name. Her reputation as a morally upstanding New England spinster, reflecting the conventional propriety of late 19th-century Concord, is firmly established. However, raised among reformers and Transcendentalists and skeptics, the intellectual protege of Emerson and Hawthorne and Thoreau, Alcott was actually a free thinker with democratic ideals and progressive values about women -- a worldly careerist of sorts. Most surprising is that she led, under the pseudonym A.M. Barnard, a literary double life, undiscovered until the 1940s. As Barnard, Alcott penned scandalous, sensational works with characters running the gamut from murderers and revolutionaries to cross-dressers and opium addicts -- a far cry from her familiar fatherly mentors, courageous mothers and appropriately impish children.

Harper Lee: American Masters (Episode #2504H)

KQED Plus: Mon, Oct 1, 2012 -- 9:00 PM

Reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" has been a national pastime for five decades - it is still selling nearly a million copies a year, its classic popularity and power are a common reference. And the courtroom image of Gregory Peck, as the passionate Atticus Finch, gave us an enduring picture for the novel's message. Behind it all was a young Southern girl named Nelle Harper Lee, who once said she wanted to be Alabama's Jane Austen.
This program explores her life and unravels its mysteries, particularly why she never published again. Illuminated with family photos, revealing personal letters and an exclusive interview with her sister, Alice Finch Lee (100 years old), the film is steeped in the texture of the novel's Deep South and the social changes it inspired. Tom Brokaw, Rosanne Cash, Anna Quindlen, Scott Turow, Oprah Winfrey and Andrew Young reflect on how "Mockingbird" shaped their lives.

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel (Episode #2503)

KQED Plus: Mon, Oct 1, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

No ordinary writer and no ordinary woman -- "Gone with the Wind" created two of the world's greatest lovers, Scarlett and Rhett, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and has sold more than 30 million copies. Born into Atlanta's upper crust in 1900, Margaret Mitchell challenged stifling social restrictions at every turn. A charismatic force to be reckoned with, she had a great sense of humor, was one of Georgia's first newspaper women and was extremely generous with the money she made from "Gone with the Wind." She struggled with the changing role of women and the liberation of African Americans but also suffered from lifelong bouts of depression, until a tragic accident lead to her death in 1949. This film examines the amazing endurance of "Gone with the Wind" and reveals the seminal events of Mitchell's life through dramatic re-enactments based on her letters, as scenes from the movie weave together her life and her work.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Fri, Oct 5, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
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TV Technical Issues

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    • KQED TV All Channels: Planned outage late Fri/early Sat 1/14 midnight-2am

      All KQED television channels will be off the air late Friday/early Saturday 1/14 beginning at midnight for approximately two hours to perform maintenance and upgrades to our electrical system. These improvements will help KQED maintain and continue our broadcast service to the community. We will return to our regularly scheduled programs as soon as work […]

    • Wed 12/28: KQET DT25 Over the Air signal restored

      UPDATE: signal was restored apx 6pm (DT25.1 through 25.3) We are aware that our transmitter servicing the Watsonville/Monterey/Salinas area, KQET, is off the air. Engineers are on their way from San Francisco to check it out. Estimated time for repairs not yet known.

    • Planned KQET (DT25) outage: early Sun 12/18 apx 1am

      (DT25.1 through 25.3) Due to maintenance and software update work being done by one of the paid signal providers, KQET-25 will need to go off the air for apx 15-30 minutes at apx 1am.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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