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American Masters Previous Broadcasts

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - Starting Over: 1970-1990 (Episode #2106)

KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 28, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Woodstock Notions (1970-1989) - What the 1960s start, the 70s bring to flower. The film Woodstock signals a new era, while new talent (including Clint Eastwood, Martin Scorsese and Stanley Kubrick) and management spark a return to taking chances and setting trends. The past, meanwhile, becomes prologue: the tough authenticity of the 30s and 40s is re-imagined in Dog Day Afternoon, All the President's Men, Dirty Harry and other pivotal hits. Key interviews: Clint Eastwood, Robert Redford, Dustin Hoffman and Jack Nicholson. Key films: The Shining, Mean Streets, Superman: The Movie, The Exorcist and Body Heat.

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - Age of Anxiety: 1950-1969 (Episode #2105)

KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 28, 2012 -- 4:00 AM

A New Reality (1950-1970) - What the Depression, wireless and war couldn't do, "talking furniture" perhaps could: TV arrives. Warner Bros. fights back with new technology (CinemaScope, 3-D, Eastman Color) and new stars (girl-next-door Doris Day and teen icon James Dean). And a showdown between Harry and Jack Warner leads to a daring new spirit at the studio that releases breakthrough films like Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Bonnie and Clyde. Key interviews: Warren Beatty, Elia Kazan, Kim Hunter, Arthur Penn and Carroll Baker. Key films: A Streetcar Named Desire, East of Eden, Cool Hand Luke, A Face in the Crowd and My Fair Lady.

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - War and Peace: 1937-1949 (Episode #2104)

KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 28, 2012 -- 3:00 AM

Good War, Uneasy Peace (1935-1950) - Warner Bros. becomes home to celebrated stars Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Errol Flynn and more. The studio -- like the world -- faces the twin catastrophes of the Depression and World War II. Warner answers with films that reflect a deep and defiant belief in the courage of common people. But after the war, on-screen noir reflects the off-screen anxiety of blacklists and political witch-hunts. Key interviews: James Cagney, Ronald Reagan, Howard Hawks and Alexis Smith. Key films: Casablanca, Now, Voyager, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Kings Row and White Heat.

Troubadours: Carole King/James Taylor & The Rise of the Singer-Songwriter (Episode #2401H)

KQED Life: Tue, Aug 28, 2012 -- 3:00 AM

In the wake of the turbulent 1960s, a new style of song and songwriter came to the fore -- a style marked by vulnerable introspection, raw, naked emotion and young singer/songwriters who shared their most intimate thoughts, backed by little more than a lone acoustic guitar or simple piano. Never before in music had the line between the songwriters and the songs seemed so transparent. They descended on the old club the Troubadour in Los Angeles, the emerging center of the American music scene - and the careers of James Taylor, Carole King, Randy Newman, Jackson Browne, Joni Mitchell, Cat Stevens and so many others were launched. Carole King, one of the great songwriters of the '60s, started playing piano in James Taylor's band, creating a bond that they still share today. It is through them and their unique voices that we chronicle this group of musicians, who played before, after, and alongside them.

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - A Rising Power: 1923-1937 (Episode #2103)

KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 28, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

In April 1923, four brothers from Ohio officially incorporated their new motion picture company. By the end of the decade, Warner Bros. hit it big with the sound of The Jazz Singer, the gangster personas of Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney and the musicals of Busby Berkeley. Directed by the award winning filmmaker and film critic Richard Schickel and narrated by Clint Eastwood, this 5-hour series chronicles the legacy of Warner Bros. with limitless access to movie clips and rare archival interviews and gives us the history of 20th century. Illuminating the footage and archival interviews are on-camera discussions with Warren Beatty, George Clooney, Clint Eastwood, Sidney Lumet, Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, among many others.
You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet (1923-1935) - Episode one introduces the four Youngstown, Ohio, brothers (Harry, Albert, Sam and Jack L. Warner) who officially incorporated their new motion picture company on April 4, 1923. "Rin Tin Tin" may have put them on the map, but soon gave way to a unique hard-boiled, hard-times cinema ethos. Tough guys James Cagney and Edward G. Robinson dominated the new gangster genre, tough dame Barbara Stanwyck headlined racy melodramas and even the chorus kids in the dazzling musicals were one bad break away from the streets. Key interviews: Busby Berkeley, Edward G. Robinson, Alfred Hitchcock and William Wellman. Key films: "The Jazz Singer," "Public Enemy," "42nd Street," "Baby Face" and "Little Caesar."

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - Starting Over: 1970-1990 (Episode #2106)

KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

Woodstock Notions (1970-1989) - What the 1960s start, the 70s bring to flower. The film Woodstock signals a new era, while new talent (including Clint Eastwood, Martin Scorsese and Stanley Kubrick) and management spark a return to taking chances and setting trends. The past, meanwhile, becomes prologue: the tough authenticity of the 30s and 40s is re-imagined in Dog Day Afternoon, All the President's Men, Dirty Harry and other pivotal hits. Key interviews: Clint Eastwood, Robert Redford, Dustin Hoffman and Jack Nicholson. Key films: The Shining, Mean Streets, Superman: The Movie, The Exorcist and Body Heat.

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - Age of Anxiety: 1950-1969 (Episode #2105)

KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 10:00 PM

A New Reality (1950-1970) - What the Depression, wireless and war couldn't do, "talking furniture" perhaps could: TV arrives. Warner Bros. fights back with new technology (CinemaScope, 3-D, Eastman Color) and new stars (girl-next-door Doris Day and teen icon James Dean). And a showdown between Harry and Jack Warner leads to a daring new spirit at the studio that releases breakthrough films like Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Bonnie and Clyde. Key interviews: Warren Beatty, Elia Kazan, Kim Hunter, Arthur Penn and Carroll Baker. Key films: A Streetcar Named Desire, East of Eden, Cool Hand Luke, A Face in the Crowd and My Fair Lady.

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - War and Peace: 1937-1949 (Episode #2104)

KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 9:00 PM

Good War, Uneasy Peace (1935-1950) - Warner Bros. becomes home to celebrated stars Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Errol Flynn and more. The studio -- like the world -- faces the twin catastrophes of the Depression and World War II. Warner answers with films that reflect a deep and defiant belief in the courage of common people. But after the war, on-screen noir reflects the off-screen anxiety of blacklists and political witch-hunts. Key interviews: James Cagney, Ronald Reagan, Howard Hawks and Alexis Smith. Key films: Casablanca, Now, Voyager, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Kings Row and White Heat.

Troubadours: Carole King/James Taylor & The Rise of the Singer-Songwriter (Episode #2401H)

KQED Life: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 9:00 PM

In the wake of the turbulent 1960s, a new style of song and songwriter came to the fore -- a style marked by vulnerable introspection, raw, naked emotion and young singer/songwriters who shared their most intimate thoughts, backed by little more than a lone acoustic guitar or simple piano. Never before in music had the line between the songwriters and the songs seemed so transparent. They descended on the old club the Troubadour in Los Angeles, the emerging center of the American music scene - and the careers of James Taylor, Carole King, Randy Newman, Jackson Browne, Joni Mitchell, Cat Stevens and so many others were launched. Carole King, one of the great songwriters of the '60s, started playing piano in James Taylor's band, creating a bond that they still share today. It is through them and their unique voices that we chronicle this group of musicians, who played before, after, and alongside them.

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - A Rising Power: 1923-1937 (Episode #2103)

KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

In April 1923, four brothers from Ohio officially incorporated their new motion picture company. By the end of the decade, Warner Bros. hit it big with the sound of The Jazz Singer, the gangster personas of Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney and the musicals of Busby Berkeley. Directed by the award winning filmmaker and film critic Richard Schickel and narrated by Clint Eastwood, this 5-hour series chronicles the legacy of Warner Bros. with limitless access to movie clips and rare archival interviews and gives us the history of 20th century. Illuminating the footage and archival interviews are on-camera discussions with Warren Beatty, George Clooney, Clint Eastwood, Sidney Lumet, Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, among many others.
You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet (1923-1935) - Episode one introduces the four Youngstown, Ohio, brothers (Harry, Albert, Sam and Jack L. Warner) who officially incorporated their new motion picture company on April 4, 1923. "Rin Tin Tin" may have put them on the map, but soon gave way to a unique hard-boiled, hard-times cinema ethos. Tough guys James Cagney and Edward G. Robinson dominated the new gangster genre, tough dame Barbara Stanwyck headlined racy melodramas and even the chorus kids in the dazzling musicals were one bad break away from the streets. Key interviews: Busby Berkeley, Edward G. Robinson, Alfred Hitchcock and William Wellman. Key films: "The Jazz Singer," "Public Enemy," "42nd Street," "Baby Face" and "Little Caesar."

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - Starting Over: 1970-1990 (Episode #2106)

KQED 9: Thu, Aug 9, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

Woodstock Notions (1970-1989) - What the 1960s start, the 70s bring to flower. The film Woodstock signals a new era, while new talent (including Clint Eastwood, Martin Scorsese and Stanley Kubrick) and management spark a return to taking chances and setting trends. The past, meanwhile, becomes prologue: the tough authenticity of the 30s and 40s is re-imagined in Dog Day Afternoon, All the President's Men, Dirty Harry and other pivotal hits. Key interviews: Clint Eastwood, Robert Redford, Dustin Hoffman and Jack Nicholson. Key films: The Shining, Mean Streets, Superman: The Movie, The Exorcist and Body Heat.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sat, Aug 11, 2012 -- 4:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Aug 10, 2012 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Aug 10, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Marilyn Monroe: Still Life (Episode #1904L)

KQED 9: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

There are the movie roles, but it is the still images - the iconic face, expressions and poses - that make up our collective memory of Marilyn. She was, arguably, the most photographed person ever. Her relationship with the camera produced an enduring body of work that still dazzles and moves us, evoking both desire and pathos. These photographs are an ageless testament to her grace, guts and sexiness - her humor and vulnerability. She understood their power, and she exploited it. She created, and curated, her own image - lips puckered to the lens, inviting us to kiss her back. She would be 80 now. She died more than 40 years ago. We look back through Norman Mailer, Gloria Steinem and Hugh Heffner, as Marilyn persists in her image.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Tue, Aug 7, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 7:00 PM

The Doors: When You're Strange (Episode #2302H)

KQED Life: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

The creative chemistry of four brilliant artists -- drummer John Densmore, guitarist Robby Krieger, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, and singer Jim Morrison -- made The Doors one of America's most iconic and influential, theatrical and mysterious rock bands. This film is the first feature documentary to tell their story, with original footage shot between their formation in 1965 and Morrison's death in 1971. It follows the band from the corridors of UCLA's film school, where Manzarek and Morrison met, onto the stages of electrifying sold-out performances and chronicles the creation of their six landmark studio albums. Narrated by Johnny Depp, rare cinema verite allows an intimate glimpse into their musical collaboration -- and their offstage lives.

Marilyn Monroe: Still Life (Episode #1904L)

KQED 9: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

There are the movie roles, but it is the still images - the iconic face, expressions and poses - that make up our collective memory of Marilyn. She was, arguably, the most photographed person ever. Her relationship with the camera produced an enduring body of work that still dazzles and moves us, evoking both desire and pathos. These photographs are an ageless testament to her grace, guts and sexiness - her humor and vulnerability. She understood their power, and she exploited it. She created, and curated, her own image - lips puckered to the lens, inviting us to kiss her back. She would be 80 now. She died more than 40 years ago. We look back through Norman Mailer, Gloria Steinem and Hugh Heffner, as Marilyn persists in her image.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Tue, Aug 7, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 7:00 PM

The Doors: When You're Strange (Episode #2302H)

KQED Life: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

The creative chemistry of four brilliant artists -- drummer John Densmore, guitarist Robby Krieger, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, and singer Jim Morrison -- made The Doors one of America's most iconic and influential, theatrical and mysterious rock bands. This film is the first feature documentary to tell their story, with original footage shot between their formation in 1965 and Morrison's death in 1971. It follows the band from the corridors of UCLA's film school, where Manzarek and Morrison met, onto the stages of electrifying sold-out performances and chronicles the creation of their six landmark studio albums. Narrated by Johnny Depp, rare cinema verite allows an intimate glimpse into their musical collaboration -- and their offstage lives.

Neil Young: Don't Be Denied (Episode #2203)

KQED Life: Sat, Aug 4, 2012 -- 7:00 PM

Neil Young grants rare and unprecedented access for this documentary in which he traces his musical journey in his own words. The film includes new interviews shot in New York and California and utilizes previously unseen performance footage from the star's own extensive archives. It also features cohorts Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, David Crosby, Nils Lofgren and James Taylor. From his first success with Buffalo Springfield to the bi-polar opposites of mega-stardom with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and the soulful rock of Crazy Horse, Young's career has enjoyed many guises. The film takes Young through his rise in the '60's, his solo artist period in the '70's, his '80's embrace of the New Wave, and it ends with Young still refusing to be denied, pursuing a more eclectic musical approach but also touring in the USA with Crosby Stills Nash & Young and teaming on occasion with Crazy Horse.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 1:00 AM

You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story - Age of Anxiety: 1950-1969 (Episode #2105)

KQED 9: Fri, Aug 3, 2012 -- 9:00 PM

A New Reality (1950-1970) - What the Depression, wireless and war couldn't do, "talking furniture" perhaps could: TV arrives. Warner Bros. fights back with new technology (CinemaScope, 3-D, Eastman Color) and new stars (girl-next-door Doris Day and teen icon James Dean). And a showdown between Harry and Jack Warner leads to a daring new spirit at the studio that releases breakthrough films like Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Bonnie and Clyde. Key interviews: Warren Beatty, Elia Kazan, Kim Hunter, Arthur Penn and Carroll Baker. Key films: A Streetcar Named Desire, East of Eden, Cool Hand Luke, A Face in the Crowd and My Fair Lady.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Sat, Aug 4, 2012 -- 3:00 AM
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    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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