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IRAs, 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans or other retirement savings arrangements

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Retirement plan assets can be the best assets to leave to charity. Naming KQED as beneficiary of all or part of a retirement account left at death can save income taxes, estate taxes or both. Individual recipients must pay the income tax on these assets, which have been accumulated tax-free. But KQED, as a nonprofit organizaton, is exempt from any income tax that would otherwise be due. So it is good tax planning to leave these funds to KQED and other assets to family and friends.

How: Simply ask the custodian or trustee of your account for a new beneficiary form, or check on your custodian's website for an on-line form. Use KQED's legal name, "KQED Inc.," and Taxpayer ID No., 94-1241309, if needed.

Note: Except for IRAs, married individuals will need the written consent of their spouses to make gifts from retirement accounts. Check with your account manager.

For more information
To request a brochure on charitable giving through retirement plans, please complete our request for information form or contact us.

Please let us know your plans
By informing KQED of your Legacy Gift, you help us ensure that your intentions are fulfilled and give us the chance to thank you for your generosity. To notify us of your plans, please complete our request for information form or contact us.


Additional Tips on Beneficiary Designations

A Word About Beneficiary Forms - Further considerations once you are ready to complete your forms

 

About KQED Inc.'s former legal name, Northern California Public Broadcasting, Inc. (NCPB)

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Drought Watch 2015: Record-Low Sierra Snowpack

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