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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, February 12, 2018

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, February 12, 2018
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media Blame it on the Alcohol This week, an entire hour devoted to what one important scholar deemed the cause of and solution to all of lifes problems. From its earliest role as a source of nourishment to its depictions in ancient literature, we examine the roots of mankinds everlasting drinking problems. Plus, how a bizarre 60 Minutes piece spread the idea that red wine has medicinal effects. Then, a look at how popular culture has incorrectly framed Alcoholics Anonymous as the best and only option for addiction recovery. And, a scientist cooks up a synthetic substitute for booze.
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA Cry, Baby Four years ago, Latino USA producer Antonia Cereijido was only an intern and still in college when she did what a lot of people do when they're not sure what their life will look like after graduation: she cried in the bathroom. After wiping her eyes and returning to her desk, she tried to comfort herself by asking the question: do Latinos cry more that other people, on average? Thus began her strange and lachrymose journey into the world of crying. Plus, the cosmic music of Cuco, and the story of A Fantastic Woman a Chilean film nominated this year at the Oscars.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Weekend The Cost of People As the price of making video games goes up, companies are tightening their belts on once of their biggest costs: People. Whether or not a songs a hit, will soon depend more heavily on where people listen to it. And its a system that can be gamed.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition How to Reduce Screen Time As many of us know, smartphones can be hard to put down. Scientists say that the sound of a smartphone notification can raise the levels of a pleasure chemical in the brain. And some doctors are concerned that the compulsive need to check our phones may reach the level of an addiction for certain people. Morning Edition will have suggestions for how to cut down on smartphone screen time.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Monday Politics: RNC Spokesperson Kayleigh McEnany Republican National Committee spokesperson Kayleigh McEnany wrote a piece for CNN back in 2016 explaining why she'd decided to back Donald Trump. In it, she praised him for "setting the politically correct prison walls aflame," and for his "honest advocacy for his deeply held beliefs." McEnany, a Christian conservative and Harvard Law School graduate, joins us to talk about the state of the party and why she thinks the President is doing a great job in office.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Steve Coll on American Military Involvement in Afghanistan and Pakistan Pulitzer prize-winning author Steve Coll's new book Directorate S illustrates the political actors and motivations of America's post-9/11 military efforts in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Coll describes muddled combat strategies, diplomatic failures and military miscalculations in what has become the United States' longest running war. He joins us in the studio to discuss the global implications of the war and if a military solution is possible.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now The New Silk Road China is redrawing the map of global trade with a trillion-dollar infrastructure initiative called "Belt and Road." Propaganda videos say it's a new Silk Road for the 21st century. We begin a week-long look at China's "Belt and Road" and its impacts around the world.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway History of the Census The U.S. Conference of Mayors says the U.S. Census is being sabotaged and undermined, and sent a letter to the Trump Administration asking that a complicated set of challenges -- largely financial -- be addressed. We look at the history of the U.S. Census, how it has evolved from its early days, and what it concretely accomplishes today.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Everything Happens for a Reason Kate Bowler is the author of the new memoir, Everything Happens for a Reason (and other lies I've loved), about what it's like to have stage four cancer in her 30s. She's also a wife, mother, and an assistant professor of history at Duke Divinity School. A reviewer in Publishers Weekly writes of the book, "With grace, wisdom, and humor...Bowlers lovely prose and sharp wit capture her struggle to find continued joy after her diagnosis. This poignant look at the unpredictable promises of faith will amaze readers." Bowler also has a podcast and a blog. Her previous book Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Movement, the first history of the movement based on divine promises of health, wealth, and happiness.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Monk of Mokha A young man from San Francisco sneaks into the Yemen civil war. He's not a spy. He's not a journalist. He's a coffee trader buying up the most prized coffee beans on the planet. How a Yemeni-American became the Monk of Mokha.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Business of Leftovers What do you do with food scraps? Well, some people find a business in it.
  • 4:30 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Business of Leftovers What do you do with food scraps? Well, some people find a business in it.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Everything Happens for a Reason Kate Bowler is the author of the new memoir, Everything Happens for a Reason (and other lies I've loved), about what it's like to have stage four cancer in her 30s. She's also a wife, mother, and an assistant professor of history at Duke Divinity School. A reviewer in Publishers Weekly writes of the book, "With grace, wisdom, and humor...Bowlers lovely prose and sharp wit capture her struggle to find continued joy after her diagnosis. This poignant look at the unpredictable promises of faith will amaze readers." Bowler also has a podcast and a blog. Her previous book Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Movement, the first history of the movement based on divine promises of health, wealth, and happiness.
  • 8:00 pm
    World Affairs The Intangible Economy For the first time in history, businesses are investing more in things you can neither see nor touch so called "intangible capital." Intangible capital, such as R&D, design, software, and brands, play by different economic rules than traditional assets. As a result, the rise of the intangible economy is fundamentally changing the economy and society in important and non-obvious ways. Jonathan Haskel, economics professor at Imperial College Business School, and Stian Westlake, policy adviser to the Minister of State in the Department of Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy, talk with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales about what the intangible economy means for the future.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson Pornography, Puberty, and Perspective Pornography can give teenagers a very skewed perspective on sexuality and intimacy. That's got some folks considering a new kind of sex education: what you might call "porn literacy." Parts of the country are changing their minds, and their laws, about equipping young people to discern reality from fantasy.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered White House Infrastructure Plan President Trump released his long-awaited plan to direct $1.5 trillion toward upgrading U.S. roads, bridges, airports and other public works projects. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with DJ Gribbin, special assistant to the President for infrastructure policy, about Trump's priorities.
Monday, February 12, 2018

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