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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, January 4, 2018

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, January 4, 2018
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Foreign Policy By Tweet In the last day, President Trump has tweeted about Pakistan, Israel and the Palestinians, Iran, and perhaps most provocatively -- North Korea. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, about the repercussions about the president's Twitter diplomacy.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Covering Catastrophe Communicating about climate change and convincing the public that something needs to be done about it is a complicated proposition, one that reporters Elizabeth Kolbert and David Roberts face daily in their jobs of covering the looming catastrophe.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Power of Meditation Here's some good news: Meditating for just a MINUTE can help reduce stress and anxiety. Don't believe it? Author Dan Harris is not surprised. A meditation master tries to convince the skeptics.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Urban Design Critic John King on San Franciscos Changing Skyline San Francisco Chronicle Urban Design Critic John Kings series Transbay Transformed highlights sweeping changes to the face of the city. In it, King explores the massive building projects that are transforming the area between the Embarcadero and the Yerba Buena district. Well talk with King about how the Transbay Terminal and Salesforce Tower will affect the citys infrastructure and identity when they are completed. And we want to hear from you: What do you think about the citys changing skyline?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Virtual Reality's Founding Father on Silicon Valley, Early Inspirations Known as a founding father of virtual reality, Jaron Lanier reflects on the beginnings of the ever-evolvingtechnology industry in Dawn of the New Everything. The book follows Laniers journey through the early days of Silicon Valley, with guest appearances by Marvin Minsky, Al Gore and William Gibson. Lanier also writes about how the shocking, tragic loss of his mother fed his passion for art and science. Well hear Laniers personal story, and discuss the tension between what Lanier calls the technology skeptics and the technology utopians.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now The Steele Dossier The so-called "Steele Dossier" which purports to show connections between President Trump and Russia is back in the news. The co-founders of the firm behind the dossier claim the FBI was already investigating Trump before they release their findings. Here & Now talks with NPR's Phil Ewing about the Russia Investigation.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Veteran Care In recent years, many Veterans Affairs hospitals have come under scrutiny for their quality of care. But an investigation by The New York Times, found one hospital in Oregon that deliberately reduced the number of patients it admitted, and cherry picked cases against the advice of doctors in order to reduce the risk of bad outcomes and improve the hospitals rating.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Neal Katyal Former acting solicitor general of the U.S., Neal Katyal helped draft the 1999 special counsel regulations under which Special counsel Robert Mueller was appointed. He'll discuss what powers President Trump has to stop or stymie Mueller's investigation. Katyal has orally argued 35 cases before the Supreme Court of the United States. He is a partner at the Hogan Lovells firm in Washington D.C.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Americas Global Food Hub New Jersey has been called a lot of things. But "food capital of America"? That's a new one. PRI's The World is in New Jersey to learn why nearly two hundred food companies have made it their world headquarters.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Flipping the Job Market Unemployment is down almost half a percent from one year ago and the available labor pool has shrunk. How thats flipped the job market script in favor of some workers.
  • 4:30 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Flipping the Job Market Unemployment is down almost half a percent from one year ago and the available labor pool has shrunk. How thats flipped the job market script in favor of some workers.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Neal Katyal Former acting solicitor general of the U.S., Neal Katyal helped draft the 1999 special counsel regulations under which Special counsel Robert Mueller was appointed. He'll discuss what powers President Trump has to stop or stymie Mueller's investigation. Katyal has orally argued 35 cases before the Supreme Court of the United States. He is a partner at the Hogan Lovells firm in Washington D.C.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials The Fish That Ate Florida The lionfish, which recently spread from its natural territory in the Pacific to Atlantic waters, is aggressive, exotic and very, very hungry. Kent DePinto explores how lionfish went from being an aquarium favorite, to the scourge of an aquatic ecosystem as it eats everything in its path - with no natural predators in these seas to control it.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson So About Socialism Socialism is on the rise in the United States. And for much of the new generation of voters, that's just fine. The Washington Post reports that in the last two years, membership in the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) nearly tripled, from 8,000 to 25,000. The average age of those members dropped from 64 to 30. And, the Post reports, these young democratic socialists are putting their ideas to practice: "Instead of seeking out stars, DSA members have focused on ultra-local campaigning. They joined sit-ins and protests against the Republican effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, but they used them to advance arguments for single-payer health care similar to Canada's. In California, DSA members have phone-banked and knocked on doors to back a state single-payer bill that the legislature's Democratic supermajority has tabled; the campaign, however, is designed to continue even if the bill were to pass." And this paid off. The DSA celebrated more than a dozen electoral victories last November. This kind of excitement to the left of mainstream party politics isn't exactly new. A century ago, dozens of cities in the United States elected socialist mayors. And socialist ideas have influenced major U.S. programs like Social Security and Medicaid. Credit for this increasing interest in socialism has gone largely to Senator Bernie Sanders, whose 2016 presidential campaign energized many frustrated young voters. But people under 30 have been warming to socialism for years, according to a 2011 Pew Research Center report. This came at a time when critics of then-President Barack Obama were quick to attach the socialist label to many of his policies - policies that even mainstream Democrats are defending today. Is this a new socialist movement, or a natural political evolution? How does the socialism of today differ from that of the past? And what effects might this renewed interest have on public policy?
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Bannon Responds to Trumps Response A day after explosive book excerpts show President Trump's former chief strategist Steve Bannon trashing Trump and his family, the president continues to be dismissive of Bannon.
Thursday, January 4, 2018

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