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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, January 3, 2018

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, January 3, 2018
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered LA Times Union Vote This week newsroom employees at the Los Angeles Times will vote on joining a union. The paper has not fared well since it was first sold to the Tribune company in 2000, with rounds of layoffs and buyouts that continued under new ownership called Tronc. Now, fresh concerns are surfacing over the paper's new editor-in-chief, Lewis D'vorkin.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Jeffrey Eugenides Jeffrey Eugenides bestselling novels, including Middlesex, The Marriage Plot, and The Virgin Suicides, show him to be an astute observer of the crisis of adolescence, sexual identity, self-discovery, and what it means to be an American in our times. His new short story collection Fresh Complaint continues that tradition. Ranging from the reproductive antics of Baster to the wry, moving account of a young travelers search for enlightenment in Air Mail (selected by Annie Proulx for The Best American Short Stories 1997), this collection presents characters in the midst of personal and national crises. We meet a failed poet who, envious of other peoples wealth during the real-estate bubble, becomes an embezzler; a clavichordist whose dreams of art collapse under the obligations of marriage and fatherhood; and, in Bronze, a sexually confused college freshman whose encounter with a stranger on a train leads to a revelation about his past and his future. Narratively compelling, beautifully written, and packed with a density of ideas that belie their fluid grace, Fresh Complaint proves Eugenides to be a master of the short form as well as the long.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition German Manufacturing Manufacturing accounts for nearly a quarter of Germany's economy... That's twice as big as its share in the US. Find out what makes German manufacturing so strong and resilient.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum California Legislators Look for Tax Workarounds to Preserve Deductions Led by state Senate President Pro Tem Kevin De Leon, state lawmakers are looking for creative ways to soften the impact of the new federal tax law on Californians. Options under consideration include replacing income tax payments with fully deductible charitable donations to the state, or with payroll taxes. But De Leon admits the ideas floated for California are highly unusual tax policy making. Forum discusses the viability of such workarounds for state residents negatively impacted by the new tax law.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum First Recreational Marijuana Stores Open in California Early Monday morning, crowds lined up outside of cannabis businesses across the state to ring in the New Year with legal purchases of recreational marijuana. We'll check in with the San Francisco Chronicle's Cannabis Editor David Downs to see how the state's new era of commercial pot sales is going so far. And we want to hear from you: What questions do you have about California's new recreational marijuana industry?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Political Comic Will Durst on Last Years Funnies, This Years Jokes A new president, a new tax plan, multiple travel bans and an investigation into Russian meddling in U.S. elections. For many, 2017 was a year of serious political news. But for a political satirist like Will Durst, it was a comedic gold mine. The comedian and nationally syndicated columnist joins Forum in-studio to laugh at last years headlines, and look to what hell be joking about in 2018.
  • 10:30 am
    Forum 'The Hello Girls' Chronicles Patriotic Women Soldiers of WWI In 1918, the U.S. Army Signal Corps sent 223 women to France to help the American communications effort during World War I. Known as 'Hello Girls,' the women wore uniforms, swore the Army oath and worked complex switchboards that connected the front lines with the military command. Some worked within range of mortar fire. But despite their service, the women spent 60 years fighting for veteran status. Historian Elizabeth Cobbs joins us to tell their story, and how it was linked with the suffrage movement at the time.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Gun Violence in Chicago There's an epidemic of gun violence in Chicago. WBEZ has done a deep dive into the way guns get into the wrong hands... and they look at some of the reasons why gun violence is such a difficult problem to solve in Chicago.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Free Speech or Hate Speech A new law went into effect in Germany this week that forces Germanys biggest social networks, those with more than 2 million users, to take down blatantly illegal hate speech within 24 hours of it being reported. Less obvious content allows for a 7 day window for the companies to consider it. Failure to follow these guidelines could result in fines of up to 50 million Euros. Already, a far-right member of parliament had her Twitter account temporarily suspended after posting an anti-Muslim message. But some are concerned that the law could lead to greater censorship, and inspire other more restrictive countries to do the same.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Chinas Benefits From Trump Journalist Evan Osnos is a staff writer for The New Yorker where he covers politics and foreign affairs. He writes in the recent edition (Jan 8, 2018) about how China is using Trump to its advantage, Making China Great Again. Osnos is also the author of Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China.
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Limits of Section 8 The program known as "Section 8," provides rental assistance to more than 2 million low-income families. But that's just 25 percent of those who are eligible. A look at how cities plan to deal with the short supply of housing vouchers.
  • 4:30 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Limits of Section 8 The program known as "Section 8," provides rental assistance to more than 2 million low-income families. But that's just 25 percent of those who are eligible. A look at how cities plan to deal with the short supply of housing vouchers.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Chinas Benefits From Trump Journalist Evan Osnos is a staff writer for The New Yorker where he covers politics and foreign affairs. He writes in the recent edition (Jan 8, 2018) about how China is using Trump to its advantage, Making China Great Again. Osnos is also the author of Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Climate One: From the Commonwealth Club: Covering Catastrophe Communicating about climate change and convincing the public that something needs to be done about it is a complicated proposition, one that reporters Elizabeth Kolbert and David Roberts face daily in their jobs of covering the looming catastrophe.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson The KKK And White Supremacy Today What can history teach us about why white supremacy is on the rise today? Author Linda Gordon illuminates the past in her new book, "The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition." At its peak in the 1920s, Klansmen - 30,000 of them - marched on Washington. Some chapters even sponsored baseball teams and beauty pageants. Gordon writes that, in the heyday of the KKK, it was a part of everyday, ordinary American life, even after federal efforts to outlaw the group. And the Klan was nothing if not organized in the decade leading up to the Great Depression. Today's hate groups are becoming more visible. Are they as unified?
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Foreign Policy By Tweet In the last day, President Trump has tweeted about Pakistan, Israel and the Palestinians, Iran, and perhaps most provocatively -- North Korea. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, about the repercussions about the president's Twitter diplomacy.
Wednesday, January 3, 2018

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