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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, November 8, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Mental Health Policy President Trump's response to the Texas mass shooting was to say that mental health, not guns, is a "problem of the highest order." If so, what measures is the administration taking -- or not taking -- to address mental health in America?
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Daniel Handler Daniel Handler is the author of the novels The Basic Eight, Watch Your Mouth, Adverbs, and, with Maira Kalman, Why We Broke Up. As Lemony Snicket, he has written the best-selling series All The Wrong Questions as well as A Series of Unfortunate Events which was the basis of a feature film starring Jim Carrey and Meryl Streep, with Jude Law as Lemony Snicket. Netflix has produced an original series based on A Series of Unfortunate Events which premiered January 2017. Handlers newest novel, All The Dirty Parts, looks honestly at the erotic impulses of an all-too-typical young man. Cole is a boy in high school. He runs cross country, he sketches, he jokes around with friends. But none of this quite matters next to the allure of sex. Let me put it this way, he says. Draw a number line, with zero is you never think about sex and ten is, its all you think about, and while you are drawing the line, I am thinking about sex. All The Dirty Parts is an unblinking take on teenage desire in a culture of unrelenting explicitness and shunted communication, where sex feels like love, but no one knows what love feels like. With short chapters in the style of Jenny Offill or Mary Robison, Daniel Handler gives us a tender, brutal, funny, intoxicating portrait of an age when the lens of sex tilts the world. There are love stories galore, Cole tells us, This isnt that. The story Im typing is all the dirty parts.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition American Beef in China When the Trump administration got China to end a 14-year ban on American beef, it opened up a massive market. But China's free trade agreements with other countries make American beef too expensive, so it's not selling. Some say that the Americans negotiating with China lack the experience to get a better deal, which could hurt American businesses. And Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep reports Chinese coal companies are changing fast. The Chinese government is making a big push in coal country for cleaner energy.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Is 'Trumpism without Trump' the Future GOP Playbook? Virginia residents hit the polls Tuesday to vote in a governor's race that has been inflamed by racially-tinged rhetoric. The Republican nominee, Ed Gillespie, centered his campaign around President Trump's agenda but has held no public events with him. Political analysts say this strategy of "Trumpism without Trump" could be part of the Republican playbook in 2018 if Gillespie wins. We look at the Virginia race and its implications for future elections.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Exploring the Link Between Domestic Violence and Mass Shootings When Devin Kelly opened fire in a Texas church on Sunday there may have already been signs he was at risk for committing such a heinous act: Kelly spent a year locked up for domestic violence against his wife and her infant son. In this segment, Forum explores the link between domestic violence and mass shootings.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Historian Richard White on the American Gilded Age... and How it's Echoed Today The Gilded Age was an era of incredible wealth and innovation, but also crushing poverty, government corruption and broken promises to former slaves and Native Americans. Richard White's new book, "The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age," dissects this era of contradictions and what it means for present-day inequality and populism.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Pete Souza As official White House photographer Pete Souza took only one sick day during Barack Obama's entire eight-year presidency. The program talks to Souza about how his images captured the Obama years..
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway The Trump Effect Its unclear how much the results of Virginias governors race can really tell us about how voters are feeling about President Trump. But, Republican candidate Ed Gillespie campaigned heavily on Trumps platform and used many Trump-style tactics along the way. The success or lack thereof of this campaign may indicate whether riding Trumps coattails is a viable strategy for future GOP candidates.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Life of Lou Reed Music critic Anthony Decurtis is a contributing editor for Rolling Stone, and is the author of the new biography Lou Reed: A Life. Decurtis was also a friend of Reed's and he interviewed many people Reed knew and his two wives.
  • 2:00 pm
    World PRI's The World brings you voices from around the globe. Its your daily source for international news, and a gateway to cultures beyond our borders.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Cuts and Deficits The Joint Committee on Taxation says the House tax plan will increase federal deficits by more than $1.4 trillion over a decade. A look at what funding tax cuts with more debt means for Americans.
  • 4:30 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Cuts and Deficits The Joint Committee on Taxation says the House tax plan will increase federal deficits by more than $1.4 trillion over a decade. A look at what funding tax cuts with more debt means for Americans.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Life of Lou Reed Music critic Anthony Decurtis is a contributing editor for Rolling Stone, and is the author of the new biography Lou Reed: A Life. Decurtis was also a friend of Reed's and he interviewed many people Reed knew and his two wives.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Climate One: From the Commonwealth Club Oppressive Heat: Climate Change And Civil Rights While solar panels and electric cars are typically associated with upper-class white folk, the transition to clean energy is also a civil rights issue. Communities of color often live closest to factories and refineries that spew toxic pollution. That's one reason why polls show more African Americans and Latinos say climate is a serious concern than non-Hispanic whites. Rev. Dr. Gerald Durley works with preachers and activists across the country advocating for a cleaner and more inclusive economy. Join us for a conversation about the climate and civil rights movements.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson Wired Up Every spy movie has someone wearing a wire... but who did it first, in real life? In the late seventies - two FBI agents used basic recording devices under their suits to infiltrate a group of crooks who were defrauding American banks out of millions of dollars. It took them deep inside the world of organized crime. Meet the agents, and the author who tells their story in a new book.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Privacy in the Age of Amazon Key On Wednesday, Amazon Key will be rolled out. With this program, consumers would install an Internet-connected door lock and an Amazon camera, which would let couriers inside your home to deliver packages. Privacy researchers are watching this program to see how much trust people put in corporations to protect their private lives in exchange for convenience.
Wednesday, November 8, 2017

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQEI Off The Air 11/4/2017

      The KQEI transmitter will be turned off Saturday morning (11/4). Utility work in the area requires de-energizing the lines for the safety of the workers. It is expected to be off for 5 hours.  Once the power returns, the broadcast will return to normal.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.