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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, October 7, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, October 7, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Contraceptive Mandate The Trump administration announces plans to make it easier for companies to opt out of paying for contraception through their health plans if they have religious or moral objections.
  • 1:00 am
    KQED Newsroom Vegas Gun Debate, SCOTUS News, Museum of Ice Cream Get an update on the latest information from Las Vegas on the horrific mass shooting at a country music festival Las Vegas where at least 58 people were killed and more than 500 injured. Then, in the wake of tragedy many are calling for stricter gun laws reigniting a national debate. Hear arguments from both sides of gun control and take a look at what California has done to try to move on from its own history of gun violence. Plus U.C. Hastings College of the Law Professor Rory Little joins us to break down SCOTUS news including gerrymandering, the travel ban, and a case involving a wedding cake. KQEDs Sheraz Sadiq takes us inside the sold-out and wildly popular Museum of Ice Cream which is in San Francisco through February.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week Gun Debate Returns After Las Vegas Shooting For 10 minutes on Sunday night, bullets rained down on more than 22,000 people at a country music festival in Las Vegas. Fifty-eight people died. Nearly 500 others were injured. It was the 273rd mass shooting of the year and the deadliest in modern U.S. history.The debate about how to prevent similar events has started again in Washington in the days after the shooting. Republicans and Democrats are expressing a willingness to consider a ban on bump stocks, the attachment that makes a semi-automatic rifle fire at a rapid pace. Will Congress be able to reach a bipartisan consensus to pass any new gun restrictions?
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club Unbelievable: The Trump Campaign and Katy Tur Over the course of 16 months, NBC and MSNBC correspondent Tur took the high road as she devoted her life to covering the 2016 presidential campaign and in particular now-President Donald Trump. A former foreign correspondent, Tur began her stint on the Trump campaign under the impression that shed be back home in London in just six weeks, but her experiences on the campaign trail altered her career and life forever. From being publicly asked by candidate Trump to be quiet during a press conference to needing Secret Service protection to escort her to her car safely, Tur received personal and professional critiques from President Trump and beyond on a regular basis.It didnt stop there: she was threatened by rowdy crowds both online and in her everyday life, but in response, thousands of her supporters took to Twitter to applaud her efforts. By the end of the campaign, Tur was a new journalism star, and at just 33, her profile continues to rise. Today, shes a correspondent for NBC News and an MSNBC Live anchor. In her new book, Tur shares her eye-opening, first-hand accounts of being an embed reporter on the 2016 presidential campaign, her thoughts on the current media landscape and President Trump, while exposing the intrigue and power at play in the 2016 election.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe Protesters Converge on Madrid The Catalan independence referendum prompted people from across the political spectrum to come out and protest, showing just how divided Spanish society is on the issue. Isabel Cadenas Canon reports from Madrid.
  • 4:00 am
    World Affairs Trust, Justice and the Conflict Continuum If pluralism is essential to free and functioning societies, it is also the sine qua non of liberal democracy. But when states fail to meet the needs of their citizens and collapse into violent conflict, what is the role of the international community and global civil society? In this conversation, David Miliband of the International Rescue Committee, John Prendergast of the Enough Project, Yifat Susskind of MADRE, David Tolbert of the International Center for Transitional Justice, Robin Wright of the US Institute of Peace, and Robert Malley of the International Crisis Group discuss building trust and ensuring justice in conflict areas.
  • 5:00 am
    Weekend Edition Weekly New Roundup The debate about gun control has returned after the shooting in Las Vegas. Take a look at the political power of the NRA. Plus, check in on recover efforts in Puerto Rico, a lookback at racial tensions that sparked outrage at a South Caroline high school back in 2015, and the music of Carla Bruni
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The New Yorker Radio Hour Ukulele Superstars, and Trouble at Trump SoHo Ivanka and Donald Trump, Jr., were close to being charged with crimes related to lying about the Trump SoHo. But, after a meeting with Marc Kasowitz, a Trump lawyer, the District Attorney never pressed charges. What happened? Also this week, Roz Chasta celebrated cartoonist and the author of Cant We Talk About Something More Pleasant?and the staff writer Patricia Marx reveal their double lives as ukelele superstars, telling the story of their remarkable career in music for the first time. And Jennifer Egan, a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, tells David Remnick why writing a novel is still so painful.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life The Perils of Intimacy Stories about mysteries that exist in relationships we thought couldn't possibly surprise us, the strangeness of putting our wants on the line with someone who may not share them at all, and how much we're willing to risk for someone we may never see again.
  • 1:00 pm
    Snap Judgment Man of Steel When an immovable object meets an unstoppable force, what is left standing? First, Glynn discovers the man behind the man he wants to be. Then, how did Ben Holmes disappear and then reappear with a bang? And what happens when a five-foot-seven, 42-year-old from Queens decides to become a superhero?
  • 2:00 pm
    Radiolab Nukes On the morning of August 6th, 1945, Tsutomu Yamaguchi was in Hiroshima on a work trip. He was walking to the office when the first atomic bomb was dropped about a mile away. He survived, and eventually managed to get himself onto a train back to his hometown ... Nagasaki. The very next morning, as he tried to convince his boss that a single bomb could destroy a whole city, the second bomb dropped. Sam Kean, whose latest book The Violinist's Thumb scrutinizes the mysteries of our genetic code, tells Jad and Robert the incredible story of what happened to Tsutomu, explains how gamma rays shred DNA, and helps us understand how Tsutomu sidestepped a thousand year curse.Then, we sit on the other side of the table and look at the protocol behind the country the dropped the bombs: President Richard Nixon once boasted that at any moment he could pick up a telephone and - in 20 minutes - kill 60 million people. Such is the power of the US President over the nations nuclear arsenal. But what if you were the military officer on the receiving end of that phone call? Could you refuse the order? In this segment, we profile one Air Force Major who asked that question back in the 1970s and learn how the very act of asking it was so dangerous it derailed his career. We also pick up the question ourselves and pose it to veterans both high and low on the nuclear chain of command. Their responses reveal once and for all whether there are any legal checks and balances between us and a phone call for Armageddon.
  • 3:00 pm
    Freakonomics Radio The Fracking Boom, a Baby Boom, and the Retreat from Marriage In recent decades, theres been a fracking boom in the U.S. This week on Freakonomics Radio, could the influx of thousands of new jobs improve the U.S. birth rate?
  • 4:00 pm
    Reveal -- From the Center for Investigative Reporting Addiction Rehab Work Camp Desperate to reduce crowding in jails and prisons, court systems all over the country are trying diversion alternatives to putting offenders behind bars. This week, Reveal takes a look at some of the unintended consequences. Reveals Amy Julia Harris and Shoshana Walter investigate an Oklahoma recovery center called Christian Alcoholics & Addicts in Recovery, or CAAIR. The founders of the program say its all about helping people with addiction. It turns out its also a work camp for a major chicken company.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion Chris Stapleton, Julien Baker, and Laurie Kilmartin The new season kicks off with a live broadcast from the Palace Theatre in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Kentucky-by-way-of Nashville vocal powerhouse and guitar hero Chris Stapleton will help start things off with a potent blend of country, rock'n'roll, bluegrass, and soul; Memphis singer-songwriter Julien Baker stops by with songs of introspection and redemption, and comic Laurie Kilmartin will join us with incisive humor sharpened as a writer (and frequent guest) on late-night television. Plus: the very first Song of the Week of the season from our host Chris Thile and our ever-talented band -- vocalist Emily King, pianist and music director Rich Dworsky, guitarist Chris Eldridge, Brittany Haas on fiddle, Paul Kowert on bass, and drummer Ted Poor -- a few musician birthdays for the early days of October, and your chance to influence live radio with the Powdermilk Instant Song Request.
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Death, Sex, and Money Death, Sex, and Money" host Anna Sale presents stories about all these subjects. Lydia Davis contemplates the right words for death in "Grammar Questions," read by David Costabile. An unfaithful husband is in crisis in Anne Enright's "Until the Girl Died," read by Kathleen Chalfant. A game of make-believe gets out of hand in Joe Meno's "Animal Hospital," ready by Becky Anne Baker. Amir Arison reads "The Silk Handkerchief," by Sait Faik Abasiyanik, in which a young thief risks everything for the perfect gift.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life The Perils of Intimacy Stories about mysteries that exist in relationships we thought couldn't possibly surprise us, the strangeness of putting our wants on the line with someone who may not share them at all, and how much we're willing to risk for someone we may never see again.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour Live from Tarrytown A special live edition of The Moth from Tarrytown, New York. Hosted by Ophira Eisenberg, with additional hosting by Jay Allison. A man faces his fear of fatherhood; a daughter revisits difficult memories and her childhood home; and a mother witnesses the impact of her son's life.
  • 11:00 pm
    Snap Judgment Man of Steel When an immovable object meets an unstoppable force, what is left standing? First, Glynn discovers the man behind the man he wants to be. Then, how did Ben Holmes disappear and then reappear with a bang? And what happens when a five-foot-seven, 42-year-old from Queens decides to become a superhero?
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab Nukes On the morning of August 6th, 1945, Tsutomu Yamaguchi was in Hiroshima on a work trip. He was walking to the office when the first atomic bomb was dropped about a mile away. He survived, and eventually managed to get himself onto a train back to his hometown ... Nagasaki. The very next morning, as he tried to convince his boss that a single bomb could destroy a whole city, the second bomb dropped. Sam Kean, whose latest book The Violinist's Thumb scrutinizes the mysteries of our genetic code, tells Jad and Robert the incredible story of what happened to Tsutomu, explains how gamma rays shred DNA, and helps us understand how Tsutomu sidestepped a thousand year curse.Then, we sit on the other side of the table and look at the protocol behind the country the dropped the bombs: President Richard Nixon once boasted that at any moment he could pick up a telephone and - in 20 minutes - kill 60 million people. Such is the power of the US President over the nations nuclear arsenal. But what if you were the military officer on the receiving end of that phone call? Could you refuse the order? In this segment, we profile one Air Force Major who asked that question back in the 1970s and learn how the very act of asking it was so dangerous it derailed his career. We also pick up the question ourselves and pose it to veterans both high and low on the nuclear chain of command. Their responses reveal once and for all whether there are any legal checks and balances between us and a phone call for Armageddon.
Saturday, October 7, 2017

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    • KQED 88.3 FM Santa Rosa site lost in fire

      *UPDATE: We have secured an alternate location and ordered equipment, we hope to be broadcasting within 2 weeks or less. We have learned that KQED’s Santa Rosa broadcast transmitter on 88.3 FM has been destroyed in the Northern California fires. We are searching for an alternate transmitter site for a temporary installation. Meanwhile, if you […]

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