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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, May 20, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 20, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered NOLA Statue Comes Down In New Orleans, the last of four Confederate statues is scheduled to come down Friday. This one is of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. While some statues have been taken away in the dark of night, this removal is scheduled for daylight, and Mayor Mitch Landrieu is expected to mark the event with a speech.
  • 1:00 am
    KQED Newsroom This Week in Russian Meddling, Bill Moyers on Politics and Media, Jacques Pepin UC Berkeley professor Steve Fish and Hoover Institution fellow Kori Schake analyze this week's flurry of fast breaking developments in the investigation into Russian meddling in the recent election. Bill Moyers discusses being "audited" for liberal bias earlier in his career and the current state of politics and the media. Jacques Pepin explains why he chose to work at Howard Johnson's instead of the White House and talks about his career as a cooking show host that KQED helped launch.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week Special Counsel Will Oversee Russia Investigations Donald Trump is facing the harsh reality of being president just 118 days into his administration. The plume of scandals emanating from the White House grew larger each day this week as Trump continues to push back against investigations into Russia's meddling in the U.S. presidential election and possible ties to his campaign. The uproar that started with the firing of FBI Director James Comey last week intensified with the revelation of memos Comey wrote that said Trump asked him to end the inquiry into former national security adviser Michael Flynn. By Thursday, the president used Twitter (link is external) to call the appointment of a special prosecutor to oversee the Russia investigations a "witch hunt." Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill are publicly committed to continue their own investigations. While more Democrats openly discuss impeaching the president, Republicans are starting to distance themselves from the Trump administration.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club MSNBCs Chris Hayes: The Two Americas Emmy Awardwinning news anchor and New York Times best-selling author Chris Hayes argues that there are really two Americas: a colony and a nation. He says America likes to tell itself that it inhabits a post-racial world, but nearly every empirical measurewealth, unemployment, incarceration, school segregationreveals that racial inequality hasnt improved since 1968. Hayes contends that our country has fractured in two: the colony and the nation. In the nation, we venerate the law. In the colony, we obsess over order, fear trumps civil rights, and aggressive policing resembles occupation. He asks how and why did Americans build a system where conditions in Ferguson and West Baltimore mirror those that sparked the American Revolution? Come hear Hayes insights on the threats to American democracy and how to preserve justice.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe State Election Win Boost for Angela Merkel Last weekend Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democratic Union Party scored a big win in a key state election. In North Rhine Westphalia, the CDU seized power from the Social Democrats whose chief, Martin Schulz is Merkel's main challenger in the September federal elections. Berlin correspondent is Daniel Pelz explains how significant the state election victory was for the Chancellor.
  • 4:00 am
    World Affairs The Big Stick: A Conversation with Dr. Eliot Cohen about the Use of Force Theodore Roosevelt once famously said, "Speak softly and carry a big stick." Today, many Americans - wary of waging another war and maintaining a military presence abroad - question this approach. But given the threats posed in todays increasingly dangerous and nuclearized world, can the US afford to shy away from hard power? Dr. Eliot Cohen, a former senior advisor to George W. Bush, will make the case that hard power remains essential for American foreign policy. Sharing insights from his recent book, "The Big Stick: The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force," Dr. Cohen argues why the use of force is a necessary measure for the Trump Administration.
  • 5:00 am
    Weekend Edition Composed by B.J. Leiderman Its been a wild week in the news: a special counsel, special testimony, political turmoil, and President Trumps first trip abroad. All that news, andyou hear the name B.J. Leiderman in the credits of so many NPR shows. Now the most prolific composer of public radio themes has his solo debut, and tells his story.
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The Best of Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the weeks events.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life Act V The program devotes this entire episode to one story: Over the course of six months, reporter and This American Life contributor Jack Hitt followed a group of inmates at a high-security prison as they rehearsed and staged a production of the last actAct Vof Hamlet.
  • 1:00 pm
    Snap Judgment The Fall Guy Glynn works at an accounting firm headed by two very familiar characters...almost too familiar. A young boy in Afghanistan was approached by one of the most notorious Talibs in his neighborhood. He never expected the request the Talib made. Find out more about Qais Akbar Omars journey during Afghanistans long wars in his book, Fort of Nine Towers. Those stories and more
  • 2:00 pm
    Radiolab The Buried Bodies Case In 1973, a massive manhunt in New York's Adirondack Mountains ended when police captured a man named Robert Garrow. And thats when this story really gets started. This episode Radiolab considers a string of barbaric crimes by a hated man, and the attorney who, when called to defend him, also wound up defending a core principle of our legal system. When Frank Armani learned his clients most gruesome secrets, he made a morally startling decision that stunned the world and goes to the heart of what it means to be a defense attorney - how far should lawyers go to provide the best defense to the worst people?
  • 3:00 pm
    Freakonomics Radio Earth 2.0: What Would Our Economy Look Like? What if we could rebuild the worlds economic systems from scratch? This week on Freakonomics Radio, Stephen Dubner discusses what that might look like. How would we address issues like poverty, income inequality, and automation?
  • 4:00 pm
    Reveal -- From the Center for Investigative Reporting The Man Inside: Four Months as a Prison Guard The government's back in business with private prisons. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has reversed the Obama-era decision to phase out federal use of corporate-run prisons. On this episode, Reveal revisits an hour with Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer who takes you inside a private prison on lockdown.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion Jim James, Aimee Mann, and Hari Kondabolu This week: the second of two live bonus May broadcasts from our home base in Saint Paul, Minnesota, the Fitzgerald Theater. Joining the program are musical guests Jim James and Aimee Mann, and comedian Hari Kondabolu. Host Chris Thile has a brand-new Song of the Week; friend of the show Sara Watkins joins as Chris's duet partner for the first time this season, and she'll also add a little fiddle to the band, along with Jerry Douglas on Dobro, music director and pianist Rich Dworsky, guitarist Chris Eldridge, Alan Hampton on bass, and drummer Ted Poor; the Royal Academy of Radio Actors, Serena Brook, Tim Russell, and Fred Newman, will amaze and astound on scripts and sounds effects; and we'll celebrate a few musician birthdays.
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Brief Lives Life is fleeting in these three works presented by guest host Michael Cerveris. Andy Warhol complains about fifteen seconds of fame in excerpts from his diaries read by Denis OHare. A novelist borrows someone elses tragedy in The Young Painters, read by Heather Burns. And a young boy and his grandmother in rural Ireland make a dramatic decision in Claire Keegans The Burning Palms, read by Patricia Kalember.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life Act V The program devotes this entire episode to one story: Over the course of six months, reporter and This American Life contributor Jack Hitt followed a group of inmates at a high-security prison as they rehearsed and staged a production of the last actAct Vof Hamlet.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour Explorers, Organizers, Interrogations In this hour, a man fights street noise with poetry; a mother of three journeys to find true north; and a book lover faces danger in the Soviet Union. Hosted by The Moth's Senior Producer, Meg Bowles. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media.
  • 11:00 pm
    Snap Judgment The Fall Guy Glynn works at an accounting firm headed by two very familiar characters...almost too familiar. A young boy in Afghanistan was approached by one of the most notorious Talibs in his neighborhood. He never expected the request the Talib made. Find out more about Qais Akbar Omars journey during Afghanistans long wars in his book, Fort of Nine Towers. Those stories and more
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab The Buried Bodies Case In 1973, a massive manhunt in New York's Adirondack Mountains ended when police captured a man named Robert Garrow. And thats when this story really gets started. This episode Radiolab considers a string of barbaric crimes by a hated man, and the attorney who, when called to defend him, also wound up defending a core principle of our legal system. When Frank Armani learned his clients most gruesome secrets, he made a morally startling decision that stunned the world and goes to the heart of what it means to be a defense attorney - how far should lawyers go to provide the best defense to the worst people?
Saturday, May 20, 2017

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQED-FM, Sat 5/06-Sun 5/07: shift to auxiliary antenna

      KQED-FM is likely to be operating on its auxiliary transmit antenna this Saturday and possibly Sunday as well. There will be workers redoing the tower light wiring on the tower that supports the KQED-FM main antenna. They have asked to begin work at 6AM and work the whole day on Saturday and finish on Sunday […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.