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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Sunday, March 19, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 19, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab Epic Battles Every day, every moment, an epic battle is raging across the globe. This hour, we take a look at borders accidentally drawn and warring microcosms, from ants to phytoplankton to tic tac toe. First, travel the globe in search of tic-tac-toe. Then, a strange twist of legal taxonomy causes a dispute over whether X-MEN action figures are toys or dolls and sparks a court case about what it means to be human. Next, a suburban sidewalk in southern California, where Jad and Robert witness the carnage of a gruesome turf war. Though the tiny warriors doing battle clock in at just a fraction of an inch, they have evolved a surprising, successful, and rather unsettling strategy of ironclad loyalty, absolute intolerance, and brutal violence. Lastly, an arms race involving trillions of sea creatures--and why their struggle is vital to our survival.
  • 1:00 am
    Freakonomics Radio Why Are We Still Using Cash? Cash facilitates crime, bribery, and tax evasion. But many governments, including ours, are printing more cash than ever. On the next Freakonomics Radio, Stephen Dubner explores the future of money, including cash-less countries and cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Dont miss this weeks Freakonomics Radio.
  • 2:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Why is the Internet Such a Toxic Place for Women? Cyberbullying, rape threats, revenge porn and cyberstalking Ask any woman who spends much time online and shell tell you -- being a woman on the internet means coping with abuse and harassment. In one study, nearly half of the women surveyed had been harassed online -- and 76 percent of those under 30. This week, we explore the problem of online harassment of women.
  • 3:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Mosquitoes Must Die! As concern about the mosquito-borne Zika virus spreads, some scientists have proposed bio-engineering a mass mosquito extinction. Today, E.O. Wilson, the biologist who championed biodiversity, argues in favor of mosquito-cide. And, musician David Rothenberg helps us hear what wed miss the mosquitos song.
  • 4:00 am
    Living On Earth Climate Rollbacks, Budget Cuts Harm EPA Science Gina McCarthy, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency for the last four years, says proposed budget and staff cuts damage the agencys mission to protect the public with sound science, and most harm communities that need the greatest environmental protection. McCarthy tells host Steve Curwood why she believes EPAs Obama-era climate regulations are on firm legal footing, and why dozens of programs on the chopping block are essential to ensure clean air and water for all Americans.
  • 5:00 am
    Weekend Edition Depeche Modes Dave Gahan Depeche Modes music reaches the outsiders. Lead singer Dave Gahan talks about the bands newest album, Spirit.
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 10:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the weeks events.
  • 11:00 am
    A Prairie Home Companion Trey Anastasio, The Staves, and Tig Notaro This week, a look back to a November broadcast from the Ellie Caulkins Opera House in Denver, Colorado. Trey Anastasio joins the program for "Back on the Train" and "Miss You," The Staves harmonize on "Blood I Bled" and "Sadness Don't Own Me," and Tig Notaro shares a few stories about life as a comedian. Plus: Chris Thile's Song of the Week, "The Elephant in the Room"; a chat with our favorite astronauts on their way to Mars; a message from Beebopareebop Rhubarb Pie; and a late November crop of musician birthdays.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Edward Snowden and Daniel Ellsberg Edward Snowden is a former intelligence officer who served the CIA, NSA, and DIA for nearly a decade as a subject matter expert on technology and cybersecurity. In 2013, he revealed that the NSA was seizing the private records of billions of individuals who had not been suspected of any wrongdoing, resulting in the most significant reforms to US surveillance policy since 1978. He has received awards for courage, integrity, and public service, and was named the top global thinker of 2013 by Foreign Policy magazine. Today, he works on methods of enforcing human rights through the application and development of new technologies. He joined the board of Freedom of the Press Foundation in February 2014.
  • 2:00 pm
    On the Media The View From Poverty The Trump White House released its first budget blueprint this week, which proposes a boost in spending for Defense, Homeland Security, and Veterans Affairs and a cut...for pretty much everything else. The Washington Post's Catherine Rampell helps explain what the budget does and doesn't contain and tells us how you should actually read it: as a campaign document. As a campaign document, the budget proposal, like the GOP healthcare plan that is also being discussed, serves primarily as a statement of intent and of priorities. And in both proposals, one thing is explicitly clear: when looking to save a few bucks, start with those who already have the least.
  • 3:00 pm
    The New Yorker Radio Hour High-Fashion Hijabs, Jill Soloway, and Bluesman Blind Joe Death Modelling can be a tricky business for Muslim women who cover up. Judith Thurman visits Nailah Lymus, the head of a new modelling agency that represents the modestly dressed, and admires the bright, bold hijabs Lymus designs. Jill Soloway, the creator of Transparent, joins David Remnick in a discussion about her new show, I Love Dick. And two fans of the guitarist John Fahey mourn his difficult life and celebrate his transformational music.
  • 4:00 pm
    Says You! The witty word trivia game from member station WGBH in Boston.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Latino USA The Southwest The Southwest was once a part of Mexico, but that doesnt mean that Mexicans have always felt welcome there. The region has a long and little-told history of segregation, discrimination, and state-sanctioned violence towards Mexicans and Mexican-Americans. Latino USA looks into that history, from the tale of outlaw Juan Cortina and the dark side of the Texas Rangers to stories of school segregation and lynchings.
  • 7:00 pm
    Truth, Politics, and Power with Neal Conan Turkeys Cautionary Example Some Trump supporters claim that progressives burrowed into federal agencies to thwart the new President's agendaeven that President Obama stayed in Washington, to run the shadow government. The civil service, bureaucratic opposition, and the cautionary example of Turkey : the deep state's role in the devolution of a democracy. Next time, on Truth Politics and Power.
  • 8:00 pm
    KQED Newsroom California AG Xavier Becerra, Legality of the Travel Ban, Trumps Perfect Job California Attorney General Xavier Becerra talks about putting the state on the lawsuit against the presidents travel ban this week, whether California should become a sanctuary state, and public safety and recreational marijuana. Plus, a panel discussion on the travel ban , undocumented immigrants, and a preview of what to expect at Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuchs hearings next week with UC Berkeley Law School dean Melissa Murray and Asian Law Caucus attorney Elica Vafaie. Plus, Tea Party California Caucus Chairman Randall Jordan says he thinks Trump is doing his job perfectly.
  • 8:30 pm
    Washington Week No Indications of Trump Tower Wiretap, GOP health plan, the President's "Skinny Budget" The White House is aggressively defending President Trumps claim that the Obama administration tapped his phones in Trump Tower during the 2016 campaign. The Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee wholly dismissed the accusations and said they saw no evidence of surveillance. Meanwhile, after the Congressional Budget Office estimated 24 million people could lose insurance coverage, the Republican-backed health care plan is running into roadblocks on Capitol Hill. And President Trump laid out his budget priorities less than 100 days in office. To make up for increased spending for the Pentagon and Homeland Security, the White House proposes deep cuts to domestic programs and foreign aid.
  • 9:00 pm
    Marketplace Weekend Dutch Elections, Conor Oberst A look at the Dutch elections and the post-Brexit political climate in Europe. Plus Conor Oberst talks carousel horses and music when hetakes the Marketplace Quiz on the next episode of Markeptlace Weekend.
  • 10:00 pm
    TED Radio Hour Open Source World The era of open source has led to countless innovations. When does it work and when is it chaos? In this episode, TED speakers explore how open source is changing how we build, collaborate and govern.
  • 11:00 pm
    Tech Nation Digital Health Special On this weeks Tech Nation, its the second of a two-part series on Digital Health. On this show, Moira speaks with DR. Rajaie Batniji, the Co-Founder & Chief Health Officer of Collective Health. It all started with a nightmare in filing health claims. Then on BioTech Nation, Rif Pamukchu, the CEO of RxMP Therapeutics. Its about the technology of stopping blood loss.
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media The View From Poverty The Trump White House released its first budget blueprint this week, which proposes a boost in spending for Defense, Homeland Security, and Veterans Affairs and a cut...for pretty much everything else. The Washington Post's Catherine Rampell helps explain what the budget does and doesn't contain and tells us how you should actually read it: as a campaign document. As a campaign document, the budget proposal, like the GOP healthcare plan that is also being discussed, serves primarily as a statement of intent and of priorities. And in both proposals, one thing is explicitly clear: when looking to save a few bucks, start with those who already have the least.
Sunday, March 19, 2017

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQEI Off The Air 11/4/2017

      The KQEI transmitter will be turned off Saturday morning (11/4). Utility work in the area requires de-energizing the lines for the safety of the workers. It is expected to be off for 5 hours.  Once the power returns, the broadcast will return to normal.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

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