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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, August 13, 2014

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Campus Sexual Assault Overview As students head back to school, colleges throughout the country are talking to them about sexual assault on campus. More than 70 schools are now being monitored over the issue.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Remembering Nadine Gordimer The program listens back to a 1987 interview with Nobel Prize-winning writer Nadine Gordimer. Her writing was grounded in love for the country and people of South Africa, and dissent against the policies of its government. In novels, short stories and essays, she explored the daily lives and moral conflicts of people living under apartheid, both black and white. Her second novel, "A World of Strangers," was banned in South Africa after its publication in 1958. Nadine Gordimer came to the Herbst Theater in San Francisco on October 14, 1987. At the time, Nelson Mandela was still in prison, and apartheid was still the law of the land in South Africa. Gordimer had just published her novel "A Sport of Nature," which she reads from in the first half of this program. Gordimer died on July 13, 2014.
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum War of the Ride-Sharing Apps: Uber vs. Lyft The battle between Uber and Lyft is heating up, with both San Francisco-based ride-sharing apps accusing each other of underhanded tactics to poach drivers and nab more customers. Most recently, Lyft accused Uber employees of requesting thousands of Lyft rides and then canceling them. What does the rivalry mean for the region, and how does it affect the companies' current dispute with taxis?
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Fremont Parents Find Health Textbook Too Racy for Teens Some parents in Fremont are demanding the removal of a newly adopted health textbook that deals with sex education topics such as masturbation and bondage. While the book also covers other topics such as nutrition, stress and body image, some parents say the sex education portions are inappropriate for 14 year olds. District officials said this week that they may delay adoption of the textbook.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum 'Working Stiff,' A Forensic Pathologist's Story Judy Melinek has made a career of working with dead bodies. As a forensic pathologist, she has probed and prodded bodies for clues that may reveal murder, suicide, a medical accident or a rare genetic disease. In her book "Working Stiff," Melinek chronicles her two rookie years working in the New York Medical Examiner's office, a job she started two months before the 9/11 attacks. Melinek, now based in San Francisco, joins us to talk about a career straddling medicine and law.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now New Superbug Hits Hospitals in Southeast A new drug-resistant superbug is sky rocketing in hospitals in the southeast -- and it kills almost half of those who get it.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Al-Maliki Clings to Power in Iraq Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is clinging to power despite the president's nomination of a new prime minister, Haider al-Abadi. The program looks at Baghdad's future, and the U.S.'s future involvement in the region as Iraq continues to experience turmoil.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air This Congress: Least Productive, Most Divisive Journalist Jonathan Weisman covers Congress for The New York Times. He joins Dave Davies to discuss this year's group, which he describes as the least productive and most divisive, by all measures. He'll also discuss the impact of the Tea Party wing, the House's lawsuit against the president, Speaker John Boehner and Eric Cantor's defeat. Who is left in Congress who will reach across the aisle?
  • 2:00 pm
    World Hamas' Pop Music Weapon Backfires Hamas has made a music video in Hebrew. It shows rockets being launched and Hamas fighters on the attack. It's meant to frighten Israelis. But many Israelis are dancing to it, and even recording their own ironic versions of the terror tune.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Consumer Spending Despite all of the data that shows a growing economy, retail sales stalled last month, falling to their weakest reading since January. So why isn't the American consumer spending?
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Africa UNICEF Study -- In a new report from UNICEF, forecasts show that 40 percent of the world population will be African -- up from 15 percent today. David Anthony was an author on the report, titled "Generation Africa," and spoke with NPR to explain.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Consumer Spending Despite all of the data that shows a growing economy, retail sales stalled last month, falling to their weakest reading since January. So why isn't the American consumer spending?
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air This Congress: Least Productive, Most Divisive Journalist Jonathan Weisman covers Congress for The New York Times. He joins Dave Davies to discuss this year's group, which he describes as the least productive and most divisive, by all measures. He'll also discuss the impact of the Tea Party wing, the House's lawsuit against the president, Speaker John Boehner and Eric Cantor's defeat. Who is left in Congress who will reach across the aisle?
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials The New York Times Health for Tomorrow: Achieving Affordability How do you achieve optimal health and wellbeing in the 21st century? What should we be doing to advocate healthy living and remove possible barriers? Dr. Toby Cosgrove, president and CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, argues for a shift in thinking about our approach to health care, and provides context for understanding the industry disruptions. Also, the American health care system has an affordability problem. Americans are getting more care, but not necessarily better care. Kaiser Permanent's chairman and CEO, Bernard J. Tyson, says the health care industry needs to transform its thinking and its approach. Elisabeth Rosenthal of The New York Times moderates the program.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum 'Working Stiff,' A Forensic Pathologist's Story Judy Melinek has made a career of working with dead bodies. As a forensic pathologist, she has probed and prodded bodies for clues that may reveal murder, suicide, a medical accident or a rare genetic disease. In her book "Working Stiff," Melinek chronicles her two rookie years working in the New York Medical Examiner's office, a job she started two months before the 9/11 attacks. Melinek, now based in San Francisco, joins us to talk about a career straddling medicine and law.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Haider al-Abadi Profile The era of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki appears to be coming to an end after eight turbulent years. Haider al-Abadi, the man set to replace him, is not a previously well-known figure.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Ferguson Shooting Investigation The community of Ferguson, Missouri remains on edge after a police shooting left an unarmed black teenager dead over the weekend. Clashes have erupted between protesters and police, and an officer was involved in another shooting overnight.
Wednesday, August 13, 2014

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