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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, February 13, 2014

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, February 13, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Facing Climate Doom Australian social scientist Clive Hamilton says that the world will likely try extreme measures to prevent climate change, seeking to engineer the atmosphere to put the brakes on runaway global warming. But Hamilton is pessimistic that governments around the world will control the emissions that are driving up the global temperature.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials State of the Re:Union New Leaders: A Black History Month Special -- Usually during Black History Month, we remember Civil Rights icons and reflect on their legacy. But over the past couple of years, the program has met a new generation of African-American leaders, people you may not see on TV specials or making nationally acclaimed speeches. Most of these men and women are on the front lines of their communities, rolling up their sleeves and diving into what can be very unglamorous work. The show introduces listeners to a new group of leaders, and what they're accomplishing in their various corners of America.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Music Royalties and the Birth of ASCAP A century ago, composers had no way of getting paid in the United States. Anyone could perform their music, for free. So famous composers like Victor Herbert and John Phillip Sousa founded the group ASCAP to collect royalties.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Bay Area Scientists Make Breakthrough on Nuclear Fusion By using a giant laser, scientists with the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory say they've made a major breakthrough in the quest for nuclear fusion. The multi-billion-dollar taxpayer-funded laser was built with the goal of creating nuclear ignition, a potential source of clean energy in the future. We discuss the breakthrough with the lab's scientists.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Study Raises Questions About Value of Mammograms Mammograms are catching more cancers but not saving more lives, according to new data from a 25-year study by researchers in Canada. We'll talk to two leading local breast cancer experts about what the report means for patients.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Back on the Market: What Online Dating Reveals About Economics After his 20-year marriage ended in divorce, Stanford economics professor Paul Oyer decided to try online dating. His economic sensibilities helped him navigate the plethora of online profiles and understand trends in dating preferences. In the process, he found that the online dating "market" offers a useful case study for teaching economics to novices. Oyer joins us to talk about his new book, "Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Dating."
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Obama Spotlights California's Drought The president spotlights California's drought with a visit to Fresno on Friday. The show talks to one expert who says this could be more than just a dry couple of years.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway The Six-Year High School Experiment One high school in Chicago has mandated a six-year program where students graduate with both a high school diploma and an associate's degree. IBM, the school's corporate partner, also offers students the possibility of a job after graduation. Twenty-six more such schools will open in three states by the fall. Can this serve as a model for future schools?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Latest on Corporate Lobbying Terry Gross talks with Eric Lipton, an investigative reporter for The New York Times who covers lobbying. He'll talk about some of the latest ways that corporations are attempting to influence Congress as well as public opinion.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Muslim Men on Coming of Age in America For Muslim teens, there can be an expectation of piety at home -- and a world of temptation everywhere else. The show talks with Muslim men about coming of age in the United States.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace 1-800 Flowers From the Corner Office 1-800 Flowers is a number, a name and a brand. Host Kai Ryssdal talks with the guy that makes Valentine's Day less stressful: founder Jim McCann.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Comcast Buys Time Warner -- Comcast, the nation's largest cable provider, is set to become even bigger. The Philadelphia-based company has reached an agreement to acquire Time Warner Cable, the nation's second-largest cable provider, in an all-stock deal valued at roughly $45 billion. Consumer groups oppose the deal on the grounds that it will hurt competition and raise prices. But the companies claim competition won't be harmed at all.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace 1-800 Flowers From the Corner Office 1-800 Flowers is a number, a name and a brand. Host Kai Ryssdal talks with the guy that makes Valentine's Day less stressful: founder Jim McCann.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Latest on Corporate Lobbying Terry Gross talks with Eric Lipton, an investigative reporter for The New York Times who covers lobbying. He'll talk about some of the latest ways that corporations are attempting to influence Congress as well as public opinion.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Grokking Democracy This special program from IEEE Spectrum examines how elections and governing have changed in today's digital world. From social media campaigns to e-voting, technology has changed and will continue to change the way politics and campaigns are run. Bestselling author and noted political journalist Jonathan Alter; and internationally recognized news anchor, reporter and producer Lisa Mullins host the show.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Back on the Market: What Online Dating Reveals About Economics After his 20-year marriage ended in divorce, Stanford economics professor Paul Oyer decided to try online dating. His economic sensibilities helped him navigate the plethora of online profiles and understand trends in dating preferences. In the process, he found that the online dating "market" offers a useful case study for teaching economics to novices. Oyer joins us to talk about his new book, "Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Dating."
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Snowstorm's Fallout on Airlines The snow and ice storms sweeping the East Coast have been felt not only on the ground but in the air, as well. Airlines are cancelling thousands of flights, and both the companies and their passengers have had to deal with the fallout.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered ASCAP in the Digital Age The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) was founded a century ago Thursday. Over the course of its lifespan, the organization has had to fight to collect royalties for its member composers, songwriters and music publishers. You might think that the advent of digital technology would make ASCAP's job easier, but that's not always the case.
Thursday, February 13, 2014

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