Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, January 17, 2014

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, January 17, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Recommendations on U.S. Intelligence Gathering The show talks with Richard Clarke, a former U.S. cybersecurity adviser and member of President Obama's Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies. On the day before the president is set to announce reforms to the government's surveillance activities, Clarke discusses the group's recommendations.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials State of the Re:Union The American Crossroads: Tulsa, Oklahoma -- Tulsa, Oklahoma sits at a crossroads of American identities. The show travels to the middle of Middle America to see what happens when these identities collide. Along the way, the program explores one of the country's deadliest race riots, a story that has been suppressed for 90 years; spends time in a native community that's resurrecting a language teetering on the edge of extinction; and visits a shrine for undocumented immigrants in a state with some of the harshest immigration laws in the nation.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition How a Former 'Lost Boy' Escaped Sudan's Civil War, Twice Daniel Majok Gui was one of Sudan's Lost Boys. He escaped and returned years later to build schools in South Sudan. He found himself fleeing the conflict, again.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 8:00 am
    Morning Edition President Obama Speaks on Intelligence Gathering Today, President Obama will give a major speech announcing the results of his administration's review of U.S. electronic intelligence gathering. The White House says the president will address the balance between national security, foreign policy and civil liberties, as well as maintaining public trust.
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we've got Sketchfest and a tribute to Sly.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Obama Proposes Limits on NSA Surveillance Today, President Obama is expected to announce that he will curtail controversial NSA secret surveillance programs that were disclosed by former agency contractor Edward Snowden. Obama's proposal will reportedly create new limits on access to bulk telephone data and install a public advocate at a secret intelligence court. We consider the impact of the new measures, and how they affect the debate on privacy in the information age.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum East Palo Alto Struggles to Remain Affordable for Low-Income Residents As part of our "Priced Out" series highlighting the high cost of living in the Bay Area, we spotlight East Palo Alto. With a median family income of about $50,000 per year, East Palo Alto is an island of relative affordability among the vast wealth of Silicon Valley. But with Facebook's offices next door and sky-high housing and rental prices throughout the peninsula, some residents wonder how long they will be able to afford to stay.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday 'Her': An A.I. Rom-Com In the new movie "Her," a man falls hard for his operating system. Host Ira Flatow and a few scientist film critics take on the new artificial intelligence rom-com.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday The History and Science of Anxiety Are you anxious? You're not alone. Forty million Americans suffer from anxiety. Ira Flatow and guests look at the history and science of anxiety. Plus, could our feet have evolved from fins? And the gender gap in medicine: why do clinical trials overlook women?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Rise and Fall of the Ku Klux Klan David Cunningham, author of "Klansville, USA," talks about why the Klan started wearing sheets and hoods, burning crosses and terrorizing African-Americans.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Street Typists of India When was the last time you used a typewriter? When was the last time you saw one? The show visits a Calcutta street where men with old Remingtons still type letters and forms for customers.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Banking's Lack of Diversity According to a new study out this week from the NAACP, less than 4 percent of the top brass at banks are African-American. There are plenty of diverse workers in mid and lower-level jobs, but at the current rate it would take over a decade -- maybe even two -- before those workers were promoted.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine This Friday marks 20 years since the Northridge earthquake shook Southern California. The quake cost $20 billion in property damage - the most expensive U.S. natural disaster until Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in 2005. It also changed how researchers study earthquakes, and how Los Angeles braces itself for the next big one.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    NSA Reforms -- NPR Justice Department correspondent Carrie Johnson discusses some of the most significant proposals detailed by President Obama on Friday. The president outlined changes to the way the National Security Administration conducts surveillance. In particular, he proposed modifications to one of the NSA's most controversial practices: the bulk collection of telephone records of calls made by Americans.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report What We've Learned From the Northridge Earthquake, 20 Years Later This Friday marks 20 years since the Northridge earthquake shook Southern California. The quake cost $20 billion in property damage - the most expensive U.S. natural disaster until Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in 2005. It also changed how researchers study earthquakes, and how Los Angeles braces itself for the next big one.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Rise and Fall of the Ku Klux Klan David Cunningham, author of "Klansville, USA," talks about why the Klan started wearing sheets and hoods, burning crosses and terrorizing African-Americans.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Can Psychedelics Effectively Treat PTSD? Could MDMA, also known as ecstasy, effectively treat or possibly even cure post-traumatic stress disorder (PSTD)? The program's guest is Dr. Richard Rockefeller, former board member at Rockefeller University and former chair of the U.S. Advisory Board for Doctors Without Borders. Dr. Rockefeller says yes - or at least a very strong maybe. He says studies involving a small number of people with moderate to severe treatment-resistant PTSD found most subjects were improved after three treatments with medical-quality ecstasy. He's cautiously optimistic about the prospect of psychedelic medicine, which he believes could heal the trauma in millions from Darfur to the former Yugoslavia. FDA-approved trials of therapy with ecstasy began in 2004, and Dr. Rockefeller believes the U.S. government will eventually approve using the drug for serious medical treatment if research on larger numbers bears out these early findings. What are the possible downsides to this research and what safeguards should be in place to govern it?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum East Palo Alto Struggles to Remain Affordable for Low-Income Residents As part of our "Priced Out" series highlighting the high cost of living in the Bay Area, we spotlight East Palo Alto. With a median family income of about $50,000 per year, East Palo Alto is an island of relative affordability among the vast wealth of Silicon Valley. But with Facebook's offices next door and sky-high housing and rental prices throughout the peninsula, some residents wonder how long they will be able to afford to stay.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report What We've Learned From the Northridge Earthquake, 20 Years Later This Friday marks 20 years since the Northridge earthquake shook Southern California. The quake cost $20 billion in property damage - the most expensive U.S. natural disaster until Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in 2005. It also changed how researchers study earthquakes, and how Los Angeles braces itself for the next big one.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered Taking China's Tough Driving Test China, the world's largest car market, added nearly 18 million drivers last year. But the government does not make it easy to get a license: China has a notoriously tough driver's test, where 90 percent correct is necessary to pass and some questions are incomprehensible. NPR's Frank Langfitt takes a crack at China's driver's test and sends his results from Shanghai.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered California Drought Emergency California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency on Friday, amid growing concerns about future water supplies for residents and for farmers. California and other Western states have been in the midst of a severe dry spell, with reservoir levels and snowpack in the Sierra Nevada well below normal for this time of year. Brown called for a 20 percent voluntary reduction in water use and eased water transfer rights between farmers. However, mandatory measures will still be left to local communities to impose, for now.
Friday, January 17, 2014

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.