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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, December 18, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Russia Offers Ukraine a Deal - But What Are the Strings? Moscow has agreed to a massive financial bailout for Ukraine, including big discounts on natural gas supplies from Russia and billions of dollars in loans. The deal will buy some time for embattled President Viktor Yanukovich, but it's unlikely to solve Ukraine's weeks-long political crisis. Tens of thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the main square in Kiev, protesting Yanukovich's refusal to sign an agreement with the European Union, and his turn toward Russia. Critics are asking what strings are attached to Russia's largesse, and economists question whether it's a good deal for anyone.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Poet Billy Collins Billy Collins is an American phenomenon. No poet since Robert Frost has managed to combine high critical acclaim with such broad popular appeal. Collins has published eight collections of poetry, including "Questions About Angels," "The Art of Drowning," "The Trouble With Poetry and Other Poems" and most recently, "Horoscopes for the Dead." His newest book is "Aimless Love: New and Selected Poems 2003 - 2013."
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The New World of Audio Books Musician Pete Seeger has an audio book out. Except it's not exactly a book. It's a collection of stories and poems set to music. "Civil War" by Marvel Comics isn't a typical audio book either. It's lavishly produced audio theater. The show explores audio books that are more like movies, without the visuals.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Bay Bridge: Report Raises New Concerns Over Steel Rods A report by two local engineers has renewed questions about the reliability of steel rods on the recently opened eastern span of the Bay Bridge. We'll discuss the findings with The Sacramento Bee's Charles Piller, who has written extensively about problems with the construction of the new span.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Judge Rules NSA Surveillance Program Likely Unconstitutional A federal judge this week described the sweeping National Security Agency program that keeps records of every American's phone calls as "almost Orwellian," and ruled that it is most likely unconstitutional. We discuss the NSA program and the role of California Senator Dianne Feinstein, chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, in shaping intelligence policy.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Former U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu Steven Chu made history as the first Asian-American -- and the first scientist and Nobel Prize-winner -- to head the U.S. Department of Energy. Chu served during Obama's first term, where he oversaw a $35 billion-plus government investment in clean energy, before returning to work as a physics professor at Stanford. He continues to speak out on the dangers of climate change, and he joins us to talk about his time in Washington, his current work on sustainable energy and the intersection between science and public policy.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Ukraine: Russia's Financial Assistance Power Play Russian President Vladimir Putin has offered Ukraine a massive financial lifeline and agreed to lower oil costs, in an attempt to keep Ukraine allied with its eastern neighbor and to reject a partnership with the West. The show looks at the power that Russia has in the region because of its immensely profitable oil supply. Guests include Dr. Zbigniew Brzezinski, former national security adviser to President Jimmy Carter (1977 - 1981) and current senior research professor of international relations at the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Pope's Controversial First Year The show talks about Pope Francis and his controversial first year with James Carroll, who profiles the Pope in The New Yorker. Carroll will also discuss his own conflicted relationship with the church. He's a former priest, who welcomed the reforms of Vatican II, and left the priesthood after the church reverted to conservative positions.
  • 2:00 pm
    World A Civil Rights Struggle in Slovakia In Slovakia, Roma families have won the right to equal schooling for their kids. But while they're no longer separate, they're still not equal. The show reports on a battle over desegregated schools in Slovakia.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Generation Jobless: Spain Unemployment is a common theme around the world, but it's experienced in different ways. The show takes a trip to Spain for the next installment of the program's series "Generation Jobless."
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Senate Intelligence Push to Release Report on Bush-era Interrogations -- The head of the Senate Intelligence Committee continues to press for release of a 6,000-page committee report on torture and interrogations during the Bush administration. There are several hurdles still to get over before portions of the report might be declassified. The CIA disputes the findings of the Senate committee report, which is believed to be critical of the interrogation practices in the years following the Sept. 11 attacks.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Generation Jobless: Spain Unemployment is a common theme around the world, but it's experienced in different ways. The show takes a trip to Spain for the next installment of the program's series "Generation Jobless."
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Pope's Controversial First Year The show talks about Pope Francis and his controversial first year with James Carroll, who profiles the Pope in The New Yorker. Carroll will also discuss his own conflicted relationship with the church. He's a former priest, who welcomed the reforms of Vatican II, and left the priesthood after the church reverted to conservative positions.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials America Abroad Global Entrepreneurship -- The U.S. is often thought of as the land of innovation - a great habitat for entrepreneurs. And, this is still the case. But why are other regions of the world, such as Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America, producing entrepreneurs at a faster rate than the United States? The show travels to Mexico City and Lagos to see how middle income and developing countries are fostering new entrepreneurs. The program also visits MIT in Massachusetts to explore the role of education in cultivating the next generation of American, and global entrepreneurs.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Bay Bridge: Report Raises New Concerns Over Steel Rods A report by two local engineers has renewed questions about the reliability of steel rods on the recently opened eastern span of the Bay Bridge. We'll discuss the findings with The Sacramento Bee's Charles Piller, who has written extensively about problems with the construction of the new span.
  • 10:30 pm
    Forum Judge Rules NSA Surveillance Program Likely Unconstitutional A federal judge this week described the sweeping National Security Agency program that keeps records of every American's phone calls as "almost Orwellian," and ruled that it is most likely unconstitutional. We discuss the NSA program and the role of California Senator Dianne Feinstein, chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, in shaping intelligence policy.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered New Neanderthal DNA Analysis Scientists have performed the highest-quality DNA analysis of a Neanderthal to date. Taken from a toe bone, the DNA suggests that Neanderthals and another group in Europe, the Denisovans, co-existed and occasionally interbred. It also suggests there was yet another pre-human ancestor running around Europe hundreds of thousands of years ago. And the scientists also conclude that the female Neanderthal from whom the toe came had parents who were likely half-siblings.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Youth Radio: Am I a Shopaholic? Whether you love buying gifts or dread trips to the mall, good luck avoiding some kind of shopping during the holiday season. Youth Radio's Sophie Varon doesn't need something like a gift-giving holiday to force her to shop. She can't get enough of it. To the point that she's not sure her relationship to shopping is entirely healthy.
Wednesday, December 18, 2013

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