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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, October 28, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, October 28, 2013
  • 12:00 am
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA Lost and Found On the first anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, the program visits Staten Island, where the storm caused severe losses in immigrant communities. They examine echoes of Sandy's effects in Colorado's recent floods; hear about people of Haitian descent who have lost their citizenship in the Dominican Republic; listen to tales of immigrants deported, saved from detention, and saving an indigenous Mexican language. The show also discusses why radio is important, especially in emergencies, two musical odysseys, and some words of wisdom from a Marine who recovers the long lost.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Poverty's Effect on Decision-Making Studies show that poverty directly affects how the poor make decisions. The program speaks with Harvard professor Sendhil Mullainathan about how everyone's decision-making is affected when they feel poor.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Arcade Fire Members of the rock band Arcade Fire have strong connections to Haiti. They've helped charities there for years, and now they're incorporating Haitian music into their own distinctive sound. Win Butler and Regine Chassagne of Arcade Fire join the program to discuss their new album, "Reflektor."
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum NSA Spying Scandal: Can the U.S. Rebuild Trust with Its Allies? European leaders are indignant after allegations that the U.S. bugged German Chancellor Angela Merkel's phone and monitored millions of German and French telephone calls. At a summit on Friday, European Union leaders warned that such spying could harm legitimate intelligence gathering efforts. Meanwhile, the Guardian reported that the National Security Agency monitored the phone conversations of 35 world leaders, according to documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. We discuss the issue.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Talking Asian Superheroes with Graphic Novelist Gene Luen Yang Gene Luen Yang became the first graphic novelist nominated for a National Book Award in 2006 for "American Born Chinese," a story about an Asian-American boy's struggle to assimilate in San Francisco. Now he's nominated again, for "Boxers and Saints," a set of books about China's Boxer Rebellion. The Oakland resident talks about his latest work and his quest to create a new Asian-American comic superhero.
  • 10:30 am
    Forum Rediscovering Long-Lost Sounds with MacArthur Genius Carl Haber Berkeley physicist Carl Haber recently was named a MacArthur Fellow for his work finding long-lost sounds and digitally restoring them. He has brought the voices of Alexander Graham Bell and Jack London back to life with a special high definition camera that reads the patterns off broken discs and other recordings and turns them into sound. The newly minted MacArthur genius joins us in the studio.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Univision and ABC Team Up The program discusses how Univision has teamed up with ABC for "Fusion," a new English language TV network aimed at young Americans.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Craig Venter on the New Era in Science As more technology emerges to create artificial bacteria and synthetic genomics, one of the men behind these innovations warns that society needs to be ready for 4-D printing and this new era in science. "There's not a single aspect of human life that doesn't have the potential to be totally transformed by these technologies in the future," says Dr. Craig Venter, who joins the program.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Philip Shenon on 'The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination' Guest host Dave Davies speaks with investigative reporter Philip Shenon about his new book, "A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination," where he looks into the work of the Warren Commission, which investigated the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Shenon spoke with many of its surviving staff attorneys and did original research on the case, and found that CIA and FBI officials destroyed some evidence and lied to the Commission.
  • 2:00 pm
    World A Yemeni Family in America Breaks Tradition The program shares the story of a family from Yemen that breaks centuries of tradition, and allows their daughter to get an education. What does that mean for her, her family, and the Yemeni women she's inspired?
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Hurricane Sandy, One Year On The program takes a look at how the East Coast is recovering, one year after Hurricane Sandy ravaged it.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    The Sequester's Effect on Science -- As the budget sequester runs into its second year, the nation's scientific enterprises risk falling further and further behind. The sequester is delaying the upgrade of scientific equipment like supercomputers, and preventing researchers from getting funding they need to launch new projects. The result, the program discusses, is a slow erosion of America's ability to innovate.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Hurricane Sandy, One Year On The program takes a look at how the East Coast is recovering, one year after Hurricane Sandy ravaged it.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Philip Shenon on 'The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination' Guest host Dave Davies speaks with investigative reporter Philip Shenon about his new book, "A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination," where he looks into the work of the Warren Commission, which investigated the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Shenon spoke with many of its surviving staff attorneys and did original research on the case, and found that CIA and FBI officials destroyed some evidence and lied to the Commission.
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) George Shultz: Issues on My Mind Former Secretary of State George Shultz offers his views on shaping a better future for the United States and the rest of the world, including how to govern more effectively, get our economy back on track, take advantage of new opportunities in the field of energy, combat the use of addictive drugs, apply a strategic overview to diplomacy and identify necessary steps to achieve a world without nuclear weapons.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Talking Asian Superheroes with Graphic Novelist Gene Luen Yang Gene Luen Yang became the first graphic novelist nominated for a National Book Award in 2006 for "American Born Chinese," a story about an Asian-American boy's struggle to assimilate in San Francisco. Now he's nominated again, for "Boxers and Saints," a set of books about China's Boxer Rebellion. The Oakland resident talks about his latest work and his quest to create a new Asian-American comic superhero.
  • 10:30 pm
    Forum Rediscovering Long-Lost Sounds with MacArthur Genius Carl Haber Berkeley physicist Carl Haber recently was named a MacArthur Fellow for his work finding long-lost sounds and digitally restoring them. He has brought the voices of Alexander Graham Bell and Jack London back to life with a special high definition camera that reads the patterns off broken discs and other recordings and turns them into sound. The newly minted MacArthur genius joins us in the studio.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Babies and Screen Time With more ways for young kids to interact with screens and apps marketed as educational, does the American Association of Pediatrics recommendation against screen time for children two and under still make sense?
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi The program speaks with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi about what she says is an "unacceptable" roll out of the Affordable Care Act and the disastrous computer problems that have hampered enrollees efforts to access the government's website. Pelosi says she is assured the problems will be fixed by the end of November and that no extension or delay of the program should be granted. She also talks about the way forward with the budget, insisting that the Democrats are ready to negotiate, but that entitlements will not go away. The Democrats have three goals, she says: Get rid of sequestration, promote growth, and bring in revenue.
Monday, October 28, 2013

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