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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, October 23, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Cleaning Up the Rio Grande Since Mexico and the United States signed the North American Free Trade Agreement 20 years ago, the two countries have worked to clean up the Rio Grande. The river makes up a large chunk of the border, but despite some progress, massive amounts of raw sewage still enter the water each day.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Richard Dawkins Evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins is best known for his landmark book "The Selfish Gene," where he suggests that Darwinian selection happens not on the level of the individual but at the level of our DNA. Also introduced in that book is the concept of the "meme," a self-replicating unit of culture -- an idea, a melody, a rumor -- which is passed along from one person to another, its longevity based on its ability to lodge in the brain and inspire transmission to others. Dawkins has recently been at the forefront of conversations about atheism. His 2006 book, "The God Delusion," offered a critique of religion and promoted scientific principles over creationism and intelligent design. His most recent book, "An Appetite for Wonder," is a memoir covering his early life in colonial Kenya, his intellectual awakening at Oxford, and the creation of his books and philosophy. He appeared in conversation with Adam Savage on October 7, 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Urbanization Displaces Many in China's Villages China is determined to become an urban nation, so it is forcing tens of millions of villagers to move to the city by demolishing their houses. And the government is considering a plan to force hundreds of millions more to move. The program talks about the desperate efforts of Chinese villagers to protect their homes.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum President Obama Meets with Pakistan's Leader President Obama and the prime minister of Pakistan, Nawaz Sharif, are set to meet Wednesday, a day after Amnesty International released a report criticizing the extent of Pakistani civilian deaths from U.S. drone strikes. The findings come as relations between the two countries are starting to warm after a major breakdown following the 2011 raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan. The White House has recently pledged over $1.5 billion in military and economic aid to the country. We discuss the meeting and its implications.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Andrew Solomon: 'Far From the Tree' In his latest book, "Far From the Tree," author Andrew Solomon examines the lives of parents with children who are "different" -- kids with conditions like deafness or autism, for example. Although many parents with exceptional children feel they won't be able to meet the challenge, Solomon finds a pattern: despite the difficulties, such parents frequently report being unexpectedly enriched by the experience. We'll talk to Solomon about the public response to the book, which won the 2012 National Book Critics Circle award for nonfiction, among many other awards.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now The Rise of Pumpkin Spice A food scientist joins the program to explain why pumpkin spice is everywhere this fall -- and why real pumpkin is not.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Caribbean Countries to Demand Reparations The program discusses how 14 Caribbean countries plan to compile an inventory of damages sustained by the impact of the slave trade, and demand reparations from former colonial slave trading countries like Britain, France, and the Netherlands.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Journalist Jonathan Martin on the Republican Party Rift Host Terry Gross speaks with Jonathan Martin, national political correspondent for the New York Times, about the rift in the Republican party between the insurgent conservatives and the establishment Republicans. The program will also examine the groups backing each side -- including the Chamber of Commerce, the Club for Growth, Heritage Action, Freedom Works, and American Crossroads.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Playing Point Guard for a Dictator The program shares the story of a college athlete who dreamt of the National Basketball Association, but ended up playing basketball for a team in Libya, owned by Muammar Qaddafi. He joins the program to tell about how he escaped -- and about playing point guard for a dictator.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace School Lunches, Part II On part two of their "School Lunches" series, the program looks at why giving out free lunches isn't exactly an incentive for kids to actually eat them.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Banksy in New York -- The British graffiti artist Banksy is staging what he calls a "residency on the streets of New York" this month. Fans have eagerly anticipated his work, hunting for his latest piece all over the city. But what if your house was his latest target? The program talks to Cara Tabachnick, owner of the building that was recently used as Banksy's canvas.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace School Lunches, Part II On part two of their "School Lunches" series, the program looks at why giving out free lunches isn't exactly an incentive for kids to actually eat them.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Journalist Jonathan Martin on the Republican Party Rift Host Terry Gross speaks with Jonathan Martin, national political correspondent for the New York Times, about the rift in the Republican party between the insurgent conservatives and the establishment Republicans. The program will also examine the groups backing each side -- including the Chamber of Commerce, the Club for Growth, Heritage Action, Freedom Works, and American Crossroads.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Burn: An Energy Journal Rising Seas -- You know all that abundant, dirt-cheap fossil fuel that's spurred the spectacular development of modern society? Turns out it's not as cheap as we thought. Hydrocarbon energy releases enormous amounts of heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, and the Earth's oceans absorb about 80 percent of that heat. That means sea levels are rising, and they'll continue to rise for hundreds of years to come. While all coastal cities face real trouble, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says Miami is the most vulnerable, in its assessment of threats to 50 major cities worldwide. Parts of Miami will be permanently flooded in as few as 15 years. Host Alex Chadwick talks with people deeply involved in the issues of how and when sea-level rise will begin to inundate Miami, as well as the reasons why waters are rising so quickly along the Atlantic seaboard of North America. To get firsthand reports on the rapidly melting ice sheets of Greenland -- a significant cause of sea-level rise -- Neal Conan, former NPR host and reporter, and Gretel Ehrlich, longtime Greenland explorer and writer, go to Greenland to meet with leading researchers.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Andrew Solomon: 'Far From the Tree' In his latest book, "Far From the Tree," author Andrew Solomon examines the lives of parents with children who are "different" -- kids with conditions like deafness or autism, for example. Although many parents with exceptional children feel they won't be able to meet the challenge, Solomon finds a pattern: despite the difficulties, such parents frequently report being unexpectedly enriched by the experience. We'll talk to Solomon about the public response to the book, which won the 2012 National Book Critics Circle award for nonfiction, among many other awards.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Obama Returns to Immigration The ink wasn't dry on the deal to reopen the U.S. government when President Obama turned his attention back to immigration. The program asks: what are the politics and prospects for an overhaul of the nation's immigration laws?
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Global Fallout from the D.C. Debacle The temporary resolution of the U.S. government shutdown and debt ceiling issues means the feared disruption to the global economy has been avoided, at least for now. The program discusses how the renewed focus on political dysfunction in Washington has further tainted U.S. prestige and may jeopardize U.S. leadership.
Wednesday, October 23, 2013

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