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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, October 16, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Man Suspected of Planning 1998 U.S. Embassy Bombings in Court The man accused of being an al-Qaeda operative and a key planner of the 1998 bombings of U.S. Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania pleaded not guilty Tuesday in a federal court. Abu Anas al-Libi was captured about 10 days ago by U.S. Special Operating Forces in Tripoli and was held in military custody aboard a Navy ship. Over the weekend he arrived in New York, the jurisdiction where he'd been indicted in the Embassy bombings case. Al-Libi's case raises the question of what to do with terrorists who are captured: whether to have them stand trial in federal court or hold them at the detention facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Author Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood is the author of more than 50 volumes of poetry, children's literature, fiction, and non-fiction, and is perhaps best known for her novels, which include "The Handmaid's Tale," "The Robber Bride," "Alias Grace," and "The Blind Assassin." Her non-fiction book, "Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth," part of the Massey Lecture series, appeared in 2008. Atwood has won numerous awards for a prolific output that spans nearly every literary discipline. In 2004, Atwood co-invented the Long Pen, a remote signing device. Her most recent book, "MaddAddam," is the third and final installment in a dystopian trilogy that began with "Oryx and Crake" and continued with "The Year of the Flood." She appeared in conversation with Frances Phillips on October 3, 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Twenty-First Century Warfare U.S. Special Forces teams made headlines recently with raids in Libya and Somalia. The program speaks with journalist Jeremy Scahill, who says since 9/11 presidents have increasingly chosen to deploy Special Forces around the world.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum BART and AC Transit Labor Disputes We get the latest on a possible BART transit strike, and check in on labor negotiations in the East Bay, where AC Transit workers have threatened to strike on Thursday.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Possible Deal to Reopen the Government? As the partial federal government shutdown enters its 16th day, and the nation edges closer to default, a major credit agency has put the U.S. on a "negative ratings watch." Locally, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will be shuttered starting Wednesday, sending at least 5,500 employees home without pay. We check in on the impacts of the shutdown and Congressional wrangling over reopening government.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum The Pleasures and Perils of a Writer's Life Even after 20-plus years of writing, novelist Dani Shapiro admits that writing books doesn't get any easier. Writing is a solitary task, she says, and "there's no reason to think the world is waiting for you." Shapiro's latest book, "Still Writing," offers advice to her fellow writers on staying focused and inspiring creativity. She joins us in the studio.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Evan Williams' Medium Twitter co-founder Evan Williams goes beyond 140 characters with his new publishing website, Medium. So what's on it?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway The Tragedy at Lampedusa: An Update Nuala McGovern, presenter of BBC's Newsday, joins the program from Malta for an update on the hundreds of migrants who have died fleeing war-torn countries. She's joined by Abbas, a 17-year-old Somali migrant who has been staying in a temporary camp in Malta for months.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Stephen Kinzer and 'The Brothers' Who Controlled American Foreign Policy Host Terry Gross speaks with Stephen Kinzer about his new book, "The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War." It's about how, in the 1950s, two brothers controlled the overt and covert sides of American foreign policy -- John Foster Dulles was secretary of state, Allen Dulles director of the CIA. Together they planned regime change in countries like Guatemala, Iran and the Congo - and helped lead us into war in Vietnam.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Cronut Craze The program discusses the cronut craze. Part croissant and part doughnut, it's rolled in sugar, filled with cream, and topped with glaze. It was invented in New York, but now it's being pirated by bakeries in London.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Jeff Bezos: The Man Who Revolutionized e-Commerce Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has taken the company from bookseller to retail behemoth. The program takes a look at the man who revolutionized e-commerce.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    An Update on the Congressional Gridlock -- With hours left before the U.S. Treasury could start defaulting on its obligation, House Speaker John Boehner finally appears to have relented to allow an end to the standoff using a mix of Democratic and Republican votes. The program has the latest from Washington.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Jeff Bezos: The Man Who Revolutionized e-Commerce Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has taken the company from bookseller to retail behemoth. The program takes a look at the man who revolutionized e-commerce.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Stephen Kinzer and 'The Brothers' Who Controlled American Foreign Policy Host Terry Gross speaks with Stephen Kinzer about his new book, "The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War." It's about how, in the 1950s, two brothers controlled the overt and covert sides of American foreign policy -- John Foster Dulles was secretary of state, Allen Dulles director of the CIA. Together they planned regime change in countries like Guatemala, Iran and the Congo - and helped lead us into war in Vietnam.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials America Abroad Egypt and the Struggle for Democracy -- It's been nearly three years since Egypt's revolution and the fall of Hosni Mubarak. Since then, we've also seen the fall of Egypt's first democratically elected president -- Mohammed Morsi --and a violent crackdown on his party, the Muslim Brotherhood. Now, the way forward is unclear. This program presents an international town hall with audiences in Los Angeles and Cairo, who debate what the military's recent government takeover means for Egypt's fragile democracy; the Muslim Brotherhood's future in Egyptian politics and society; the role of Islam in politics and public life; and how Americans perceive recent developments in Egypt. Panelists include: Sarah Eltantawi, post-doctoral fellow in Arab studies at UC Berkeley, specializing in political Islam in the contemporary Muslim world; Maha Awadi, Egyptian-American host, producer and media consultant who worked in Egypt for 14 years; and Ambassador Raouf Saad, former assistant foreign minister of Egypt.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum The Pleasures and Perils of a Writer's Life Even after 20-plus years of writing, novelist Dani Shapiro admits that writing books doesn't get any easier. Writing is a solitary task, she says, and "there's no reason to think the world is waiting for you." Shapiro's latest book, "Still Writing," offers advice to her fellow writers on staying focused and inspiring creativity. She joins us in the studio.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Gaza's IT Startups Building an information technology (IT) startup in the Gaza Strip isn't simple. Electricity is sporadic, there's no mobile 3G and even if you can sell your app outside Gaza's tightly controlled borders, it's difficult to get paid. Still, IT has some advantages in Gaza, and the possibilities have fostered a crop of devout entrepreneurs. At a first-of-its kind session to win seed money this week, Gazan entrepreneurs pitched, among other things, an app that uses music to help colorblind people dress well, a sports social network and 3-D printing for the masses.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The Debate Over Greenland's UraniumGreenland, still controlled to some degree by Denmark, has large deposits of rare earth elements and uranium. There is a ban on uranium mining that dates back 25 years when nuclear-averse Denmark asserted much greater control over the island. The ruling party in Greenland wants to lift the ban on uranium mining to achieve economic independence. The opposition party warns of adverse consequences.
Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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