Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, October 9, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, October 9, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Giuseppe Verdi's 200th This week marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of composer Giuseppe Verdi. The program speaks with John Mauceri, an American conductor, producer and arranger, who discusses Verdi's career both in terms of how he was regarded during his lifetime and where Verdi stands now, two centuries later.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Linda Ronstadt One of the most iconic artists of our time, Linda Ronstadt has sold more than 100 million records, won numerous awards, and toured all over the world. Born into a musical family, her childhood was filled with everything from Hank Williams to Gilbert and Sullivan, Mexican folk music to jazz and opera. Her forthcoming memoir, "Simple Dreams," tells the story of her early artistic curiosity and the wide-ranging and utterly unique career it led to. Ronstadt arrived in Los Angeles just as the folk-rock movement was beginning to bloom, setting the stage for the development of country-rock. After the dissolution of her first band, the Stone Poneys, Linda went out on her own and quickly found success. As part of the coterie of like-minded artists who played at the Troubadour club in West Hollywood, she helped define the musical style that dominated American music in the 1970s. She appeared in conversation with Roy Eisenhardt on September 26, 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Dilemma of Generational Gene Therapy Soon scientists may be able to prevent genetic diseases by transplanting DNA into a woman's eggs -- but there are enormous ethical implications. For example, parents might use the therapy to create designer babies. The program discusses the dilemma of generational gene therapy.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Janet Yellen Appointed to Head the Federal Reserve President Obama is expected to nominate UC Berkeley professor emeritus Janet Yellen as the new head of the Federal Reserve on Wednesday. If the Senate approves her nomination, Yellen will succeed Ben Bernanke when his term expires at the end of January. We discuss Yellen's background and what her possible appointment would mean for the Fed and the economy.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Cuts in Federal Funding Hurt Scientific Research UC Berkeley molecular biologist Randy Schekman won the Nobel Prize for Medicine with two other scientists this week. But he says the kind of basic science research that led to his prize might have never gotten funded if he were applying for grants today. We talk with Schekman and UCSF scientist David Julius about the impact of federal budget cuts on the sciences.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Malcolm Gladwell: Secrets of the Underdog's Success Why do underdogs sometimes end up leading the pack? Malcolm Gladwell explores this question in his latest book, "David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants." The bestselling author joins us in studio for a discussion about turning your disadvantage into a winning advantage.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Ending the Nation's Longest War The War in Afghanistan entered its 13th year this week. The program looks at the U.S. strategy to end what is now the nation's longest war.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Women and the Sciences The Nobel Prizes in medicine, physics and chemistry have been announced this week and all of the prizes have gone to men. Why are there are still so few women in the sciences?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Ryan Lizza on the Keystone XL Pipeline Battle New Yorker Washington correspondent Ryan Lizza speaks with guest host Dave Davies about the battle over the Keystone XL Pipeline, a 1,700-mile pipeline that would carry oil from northern Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. He'll also talk about the billionaire former hedge fund owner who's thrown himself into the fight. Why do environmentalists say stopping the pipeline is critical in the battle to stop global warming? And why does President Obama has a tough call to make?
  • 2:00 pm
    World Somali-Americans and their Condemnation of al-Shabab Somali-Americans living in Minnesota have condemned the group al-Shabab. They worry, like other Americans, about that Somali extremist group. A Twin Cities imam tells the program why he's declared war on al-Shabab.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace America Futures Project: Immunity from the Government Shutdown For the next installment of the American Futures project, the Atlantic's Jim Fallows explains that, strangely, many small towns aren't feeling any effects of the government shutdown.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Update on Syria's Chemical Weapons -- The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is sending another team of inspectors to Syria. They are moving quickly to rid Syria of its chemical weapons stockpiles, as outlined in a U.N. Security Council resolution. The U.S. has praised Bashar al-Assad's regime for keeping its pledge, so far. But many activists are worried that this chemical weapons deal buys Assad more time. The U.S. insists that is not the case. The program discusses the issue.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace America Futures Project: Immunity from the Government Shutdown For the next installment of the American Futures project, the Atlantic's Jim Fallows explains that, strangely, many small towns aren't feeling any effects of the government shutdown.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Ryan Lizza on the Keystone XL Pipeline Battle New Yorker Washington correspondent Ryan Lizza speaks with guest host Dave Davies about the battle over the Keystone XL Pipeline, a 1,700-mile pipeline that would carry oil from northern Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. He'll also talk about the billionaire former hedge fund owner who's thrown himself into the fight. Why do environmentalists say stopping the pipeline is critical in the battle to stop global warming? And why does President Obama has a tough call to make?
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Freakonomics Radio How Much Does Your Name Matter? -- When Harvard professor Latanya Sweeney typed her name in Google one day, she noticed something strange: an ad with the heading: "Latanya Sweeney, Arrested?" But she had never been arrested -- and neither had the only other Latanya Sweeney in the U.S. So why did the ad suggest so? Thousands of Google searches later, Sweeney discovered that Googling distinctively black names is more likely to produce an ad that suggests a criminal background. In the program, host Stephen Dubner investigates the latest research on names; Steve Levitt reveals what a name says about your economic status and race; and University of Chicago political scientist Eric Oliver explains why a baby named Cody is likely to have conservative parents, while Leif was probably born into a liberal family.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Malcolm Gladwell: Secrets of the Underdog's Success Why do underdogs sometimes end up leading the pack? Malcolm Gladwell explores this question in his latest book, "David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants." The bestselling author joins us in studio for a discussion about turning your disadvantage into a winning advantage.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered A Newspaper Roundtable on the Shutdown For a view of the partial government shutdown across the country, the program speaks with Felica Belman, opinion editor of the Concord Monitor in Concord, New Hampshire; Patrick Malone, political reporter for The Coloradoan in Fort Collins, Colorado; and Brian Pearson, managing editor of the Tyler Morning Telegraph in Tyler, Texas.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Nobel Prize in Chemistry Winners On Wednesday, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded jointly to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel. Karplus, Levitt and Warshel won the prize for laying the foundation for computer models that help researchers understand and predict chemical processes like the purification of exhaust fumes or photosynthesis in green leaves.
Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.