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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, August 31, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 31, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Sec. John Kerry: Clear Evidence of Chemical Weapons in Syria Secretary of State John Kerry says there is clear evidence that the Syrian government used chemical weapons against its citizens. He laid out that evidence at a briefing at the State Department, and pledged a "tailored and limited" U.S. response to hold the Assad regime accountable. The program discusses his statements and what effect they may have on U.S. policy in Syria.
  • 1:00 am
    Radio Specials Heat and Harvest Like what you see in the supermarket produce section? Enjoy, because things may be changing there -- the prices, even the mix of available fruits, nuts and veggies. Long acknowledged as "the nation's salad bowl," California's farm belt is facing some thorny challenges from our changing climate: rising temperatures, an uncertain water supply and more abundant pests that threaten multi-billion-dollar crops. The half-hour documentary Heat and Harvest, a co-production of KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting, examines these threats and some potential solutions.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week U.S. Makes Case for Military Strike on Syria On Friday, Secretary of State John Kerry made a forceful case for a strike on Syria in response to the chemical weapons attack earlier in the month. Kerry said the U.S. has knowledge of more than 1,400 deaths and that all signs point to the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.On Wednesday, during an interview with Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, President Barack Obama talked about the need for intervention in Syria's civil war on the basis of U.S. national security interests as well as humanitarian concerns.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club Egypt and the Middle East: What's Next? In 2011, the world watched as revolutions rocked the Middle East. Egypt, inspired by the ongoing protests in Tunisia that led to the fall of dictator Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali, ousted their own autocrat, President Hosni Mubarak, after citizens took to the streets. Two years later, the revolution in Egypt continues. What does the political climate in Egypt look like today? What happens next for the country, and what does it mean for the region? The program unpacks the on-the-ground story, explores the events between 2011 and today, and discusses the future of Egypt and the Middle East. Guests include: Michael Nacht, professor and former dean, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley; Jamal Dajani, vice president of Middle East, North Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, Internews Network; Dina Ibrahim, associate professor of broadcast and electronic communication arts at SFSU; and Kristen Chick, correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor. The discussion was moderated by Jonathan Curiel, journalist and author of "Al'America: Travel Through America's Arab and Islamic Roots."
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe A Controversial Danish Imam Transforms In 2005, protests and violence erupted around the world after a Danish newspaper published cartoons satirizing the prophet Mohammed. Eight years on, a controversial radical Muslim religious leader who helped stoke that worldwide anger has undergone a dramatic transformation. Ahmed Akkari, a former imam, now says the drawings were justified as free expression. And after being hostile to Denmark's liberal society, Mr Akkari now believes that democracy is a good thing. The program discusses how, in taking this new stance, he has alienated himself from many of Denmark's Muslims.
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Climate Crisis: Obligation and Opportunity Hurricane Sandy, record wildfires and intensified cycles of drought and flood have awakened the American public to the climate crisis at hand. What few know is that the U.S. has become a global leader in the fight to reduce carbon pollution. Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, discusses how averting the potential global catastrophe caused by climate disruption is also a historic chance to create a better world, powered by clean energy prosperity.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The Best of Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life Babysitting The program shares stories of babysitters, and what goes on while mom and dad are away -- that mom and dad never find out about. For instance, two teenagers decide to invent children to babysit, as an excuse to get out of their own house.
  • 1:00 pm
    Radio Specials American Radioworks One Child at a Time: Custom Learning in the Digital Age -- Researchers have long known the best way to learn is with a personal tutor. But tutoring is expensive, and providing the benefits of tutoring to everyone hasn't been possible. Experts now say, however, technology creates new ways for schools to customize education for each student. This program documents the rise of so-called "personalized learning." It takes listeners to schools that are reinventing their approach to education, and explores how teaching and learning change when personalization replaces one-size-fits-all in the classroom.
  • 2:00 pm
    Moyers & Company Encore: John Lewis Marches On Host Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington both attended 50 years ago. Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attract the attention of schoolchildren, and conduct a spontaneous living history lesson.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Living On Earth Where the Forest Ends The plantations spreading over Sumatra aren't spreading onto empty land -- poor rural villages often get swept up in big decisions made in Jakarta for Indonesia's forests. The program reports from Teluk Kabung, where the arrival of the pulpwood industry has devastated the cash crop of coconuts and left villagers with little hope for the future.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion One Fair Fair The program presents a compilation of shows at the Grandstand in 2004, 2007, 2008, and 2009; including music from singers Suzy Bogguss and Shawn Colvin, and Garrison's ode to fair food, "On a Stick."
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Dreams and Schemes Guest host Neil Gaiman introduces two American classics. Stephen Colbert reads Ray Bradbury's futuristic "The Veldt," where a virtual reality nursery turns on its owners. And in James Thurber's "The Catbird Seat," a mild-mannered employee plots revenge.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life Babysitting The program shares stories of babysitters, and what goes on while mom and dad are away -- that mom and dad never find out about. For instance, two teenagers decide to invent children to babysit, as an excuse to get out of their own house.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour Taxidermy, Orderlies and Spinal Tap A socialite turned social activist inherits her mother's hunting trophy collection; a hospital orderly with an attitude problem is put to the test; and Tony Hendra takes us on the set of the groundbreaking and hilarious 1984 mockumentary, "This Is Spinal Tap."
  • 11:00 pm
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • 12:00 am
Saturday, August 31, 2013

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Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.