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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, August 27, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, August 27, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The International Response to Syria Even as United Nations inspectors try to determine whether and what kind of chemical weapons were used in Syria last week, international diplomats are trying to determine how to respond. Russia has made clear it wants no part of any intervention. It is a veto holder on the U.N. Security Council, so there's no chance the U.N. will authorize military force. If the U.S. and its partners want to act, they will have to do so without U.N. legal cover.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Climate Crisis: Obligation and Opportunity Hurricane Sandy, record wildfires and intensified cycles of drought and flood have awakened the American public to the climate crisis at hand. What few know is that the U.S. has become a global leader in the fight to reduce carbon pollution. Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, discusses how averting the potential global catastrophe caused by climate disruption is also a historic chance to create a better world, powered by clean energy prosperity.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Cee-Lo Green and Goodie Mob Cee-Lo Green got his start in music with the Atlanta hip hop group Goodie Mob. He had his biggest success later, as a solo artist -- but now Goodie Mob has reunited. Cee-Lo Green joins the program and talks about Goodie Mob's new album, "Age Against the Machine."
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Closing of the Bay Bridge Transit officials are urging commuters to take public transportation when the Bay Bridge shuts down for five days starting this Wednesday at 8pm. And they're warning drivers to expect significant delays in and out of San Francisco. We'll discuss commute options during the closure and look ahead to the much-anticipated opening of the new eastern span.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum New Findings on How Exercise Affects Sleep A recent study out of Northwestern University affirms the long-held notion that exercise improves sleeping patterns, but finds that for insomniacs, it takes four months of exercise for sleep improvements to actually kick in. We'll speak with a lead author of the study about the latest research on exercise and insomnia.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Peter Orner's 'Last Car Over the Sagamore Bridge' When Peter Orner saw a man at his local coffee shop poring over a book, the short story writer wondered if the man was nearsighted, or loved "the little book so much he wanted to get as close as possible to the words." Orner joins us to talk about his own love of words and his new short story collection, "Last Car Over the Sagamore Bridge." The Guggenheim Fellow and associate creative writing professor at San Francisco State University will also discuss the power of memory, his focus on human rights law, and why reading "Howards End" makes him think about gentrification in Bernal Hill.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now The Latest from Syria The program discusses the latest developments in Syria, and summer camps where kids visit their dads in prison.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway The Growing Environmental Movement in Sports The Green Sports Alliance is a group of companies, sports teams and stadiums that aim to make sporting events more environmentally friendly. As the group convenes in New York this week, the program discusses the growing environmental movement in sports.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Late Night Week: Classic Jay Leno As the program's "Late Night Week" continues, guest host David Bianculli airs excerpts from Jay Leno's first appearance on the "Tonight Show" in 1977, followed by a 1996 interview with Leno, just before his 5th anniversary as the host of the "Tonight Show." The show also looks back on a 2003 interview with Conan O'Brien.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Family Planning in Kenya The program visits a family planning clinic in Kenya. Women there are taking the lead in limiting family size, and many don't tell their husbands they're on birth control.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Transcending Themes of Wealth and Poverty Ville Rose is a small town where only 5 percent of residents are wealthy. It's also the back drop of the latest novel from Haitian author Edwidge Danticat. The program discusses how the novel's themes of wealth and poverty mirror everyday life in America.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Geronimo Hot Shots -- One of the firefighting crews trying to contain the Rim Fire in and around Yosemite National Park is the Geronimo Hot Shot team from San Carlos, Arizona. They're one of seven elite Native American firefighting crews in the West.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Transcending Themes of Wealth and Poverty Ville Rose is a small town where only 5 percent of residents are wealthy. It's also the back drop of the latest novel from Haitian author Edwidge Danticat. The program discusses how the novel's themes of wealth and poverty mirror everyday life in America.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Late Night Week: Classic Jay Leno As the program's "Late Night Week" continues, guest host David Bianculli airs excerpts from Jay Leno's first appearance on the "Tonight Show" in 1977, followed by a 1996 interview with Leno, just before his 5th anniversary as the host of the "Tonight Show." The show also looks back on a 2003 interview with Conan O'Brien.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Encore: Stroke of Insight: Strengthening the Brain with Jill Bolte Taylore At the age of 37, Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor had a massive stroke and watched as her brain functions -- motion, speech, memory, linear thinking and self-awareness -- shut down one by one. After a long and successful rehabilitation, she has become a spokesperson for the possibility of full recovery from brain injury. In her best-selling book, "My Stroke of Insight," Dr. Bolte chronicles her recovery as well as her personal study of perception as it differs between left brain processing and right brain experiencing. Dr. Bolte is the national spokesperson for the Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center and is an active member and supporter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. She appeared in conversation with Thomas Goetz on January 28, 2013.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Peter Orner's 'Last Car Over the Sagamore Bridge' When Peter Orner saw a man at his local coffee shop poring over a book, the short story writer wondered if the man was nearsighted, or loved "the little book so much he wanted to get as close as possible to the words." Orner joins us to talk about his own love of words and his new short story collection, "Last Car Over the Sagamore Bridge." The Guggenheim Fellow and associate creative writing professor at San Francisco State University will also discuss the power of memory, his focus on human rights law, and why reading "Howards End" makes him think about gentrification in Bernal Hill.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Public Playgrounds Become More Accessible to Disabled Children New federal requirements under the Americans with Disabilities Act are changing the landscape for public playgrounds, requiring them to include equipment, materials and designs that provide children with disabilities the same play opportunities as typical children. The program explores the effects of the new rules, and finds that parents and advocates are making the real difference -- not the federal government.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The High Price of Sewage Miami, like many cities around the country, is facing a crisis over sewage. Because of the high cost, Miami-Dade County has put off long-needed upgrades to its wastewater system. Now in one neighborhood, businesses can't expand and developers can't build because of a lack of sewage treatment capacity. The federal government has stepped in and is forcing Miami-Dade to spend more than $4 billion to upgrade its sewer system. But even that may not be enough. Environmental groups say the county needs to spend more on a robust system that takes into account sea-level rise expected because of global warming.
Tuesday, August 27, 2013

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