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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, August 24, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 24, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The Uncertainty of U.S. Intelligence Warnings The partial reopening of the U.S. Embassy in Yemen, which was the focus of a recent terror alert, suggests that the immediate threat of a terrorist attack has passed. Officials cannot be certain whether the alert disrupted planning for a possible attack, whether the threat was a bluff or whether the intelligence that led to the alert was flawed. The issuance of warnings is a specialty within the intelligence community, but the recent episode underscores how much uncertainty surrounds the field.
  • 1:00 am
    This Week in Northern California Oakland Tries to Even the Odds for African-American Boys In a collaboration between KQED and the San Francisco Chronicle series "Even Odds," the program offers an in-depth look at the daunting challenges faced by African-American males in Oakland, and the city's attempt to address them. Three years ago, the Oakland Unified School District faced an alarming statistic -- more than half of its African-American boys would not graduate. The troubling dropout rate had many factors at play: poverty, crime, high suspension rates and rising absenteeism. The district responded by opening the Office of African American Male Achievement. Its mission is to improve academic outcomes for black boys by pairing them with black men. While race-based, community mentorship is not new, for a public school system it was controversial. The early results are encouraging, but it remains to be seen whether this novel approach will actually work
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week The Obama Administration and Egypt President Obama returned from his New England vacation to a myriad of overseas and national security issues. In Egypt, the interim government continues its crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood amidst the release of former President Hosni Mubarak from prison. He still faces a retrial in connection with the deaths of protestors during the Egyptian uprisings of 2011 that led to his ouster from office. How might these latest developments play as the Obama administration wrestles with whether to cut aid to the country due to the recent violence?
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club George Shultz The world is awash in change. What can be done to re-create the sense of relative stability that emerged from the creative efforts of statesmen after the end of World War II? Former Nixon and Reagan cabinet member George Shultz offers his views on how to govern more effectively, get our economy back on track, take advantage of new opportunities in the energy field, combat the use of addictive drugs, apply a strategic overview to diplomacy, and identify necessary steps to achieve a world without nuclear weapons. The conversation was moderated by Dr. Gloria C. Duffy, president and CEO of The Commonwealth Club.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe The French Pop Explosion Gone are the days when French pop was a joke. The U.K. and the U.S. both had a French number-one-hit this summer. Indeed, in Britain, "Get Lucky" by the French electro duo Daft Punk has sold more than any other single so far this century. Their new album got to number one in 92 countries. The program discusses how the French have all of a sudden become "incredibly cool."
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) America's Energy Opportunity Advances in existing technologies have brought America to a new level of energy production. However, as energy demands continue to grow, the debate over where this energy should come from intensifies, with some arguing in favor of fossil fuels and others championing renewable power. The program's guest is Michael Levi, senior fellow for energy and the environment and director of the Program on Energy Security and Climate Change at the Council on Foreign Relations. Levi argues that both options offer great opportunities for the U.S. to strengthen its economy, bolster its security and protect the environment.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life I Was Just Trying to Help The program shares stories of people doing the noble thing and stepping up to help, only to find out that others think what they're doing isn't helping at all. The show looks at a charity that's decided to just give people money, and a sheriff in California devises a plan to let farmers grow marijuana -- as long as they register with him.
  • 1:00 pm
    Radio Specials America Abroad Syria and the Responsibility to Protect -- The civil war in Syria rages on, and by all accounts, it is a grave humanitarian crisis. The Obama administration has come under steady criticism for failing to do more to stop the violence. The program reviews the application of the "Responsibility to Protect" in cases of conflict during the post-Cold War period. The "Responsibility to Protect," or "R-to-P," is an international principle that was codified by the United Nations in 2005. It's based on the premise that every government has a responsibility to protect its citizenry from atrocities or mass murder. Anchor Madeleine Brand examines how the U.S. and the international community have responded to humanitarian crises around the globe -- from Somalia and Rwanda to Bosnia and Libya.
  • 2:00 pm
    Moyers & Company America's Gilded Capital Mark Leibovich covers Washington, D.C. as chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine. In his new book, "This Town," he writes about the city's bipartisan lust for power, cash and notoriety. It's the story of how Washington became an occupied city; its hold on reality distorted by greed and ambition. Leibovich pulls no punches, names names, and reveals the movers, the shakers and the lucrative deals they make -- all in the name of crony capitalism.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Living On Earth Nuclear Storage Dilemma The Fukushima disaster in Japan grabbed the headlines, but the United States has a nuclear problem on its hands as well. The program speaks with Ed Lyman from the Union for Concerned Scientists, about what the United States can do with all the nuclear waste from its power stations.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion Hot, Cheesy, and Way Greasy The program rebroadcasts a September 2010 show from the Minnesota State Fair Grandstand. Sara Watkins sings "I'll Be Home," Jearlyn and Jevetta Steele join host Garrison Keillor on "Swing Down Chariot," The Cactus Blossoms harmonize on "Crazy Arms," and the Anoka High School Marching Band performs "Danse Macabre."
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Odd Couples Guest host Cynthia Nixon presents stories by two American masters that feature improbable relationships. James Naughton reads Raymond Carver's "Cathedral," where a man is bemused by his wife's blind friend. And Isaiah Sheffer reads "Dating Jane Austen," by the incorrigible T.C. Boyle.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life I Was Just Trying to Help The program shares stories of people doing the noble thing and stepping up to help, only to find out that others think what they're doing isn't helping at all. The show looks at a charity that's decided to just give people money, and a sheriff in California devises a plan to let farmers grow marijuana -- as long as they register with him.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour War, Barbie Dream House, Coco and a Nekkid Man -- Phil Caputo shares how a bullet wound helped heal his soul; a little girl learns what love is all about after surviving a terrible car accident; a young man and his father succumb to guilt at the animal shelter; and a burnt-out corporate executive tries to shake her type-A personality at art school
  • 11:00 pm
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • 12:00 am
Saturday, August 24, 2013

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Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.