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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, August 22, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, August 22, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Bradley Manning Sentenced Army private Bradley Manning has been sentenced to 35 years in prison by the military judge who convicted him of multiple offenses for providing classified documents to the Web site Wikileaks. The program has the latest on the sentencing.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Hearing Voices Old School: Back-to-School Special -- Richard Paul follows "School VP," assistant principal Irasema Salcido, through her hectic multi-lingual morning at Washington D.C.'s Bell Multicultural High School. Host Katie Davis finds she "Got Carried," slam poet and history teacher Taylor Mali schools us on "What Teachers Make," and producer Hillary Frank gets the shy "Quiet Kids" to speak up.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition What Your Meta-Data Can Reveal About You The federal government has been gathering Americans' meta-data, such as lists of phone calls. Courts say that doesn't violate people's privacy because it doesn't reveal much. But detection programs can uncover a lot of information from people's phone and email logs. The program discusses what your meta-data can reveal about you.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum New Efforts Put Pressure on Parents to Vaccinate Kids Bay Area students are heading back to school this month amid news that an increasing number of parents have opted not to vaccinate their kids. The number of unvaccinated children in California has tripled in the last decade. Nearly 10 percent of kindergartners statewide last year didn't have all of their required immunizations. In Marin Country, only 82 percent of kindergartners were fully vaccinated. To fight this trend, a Marin pediatric practice with 8,000 patients has refused to treat those who aren't vaccinated, public health officials have launched information campaign and a new state law requires parents to consult with a doctor before opting out of vaccines. A well-known bio-ethicist is even proposing lawsuits against parents who refuse to immunize. We talk about efforts to pressure parents to vaccinate their kids. Why are vaccination opt-out rates rising? Will efforts to turn the tide work?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Is Discrimination Prevalent Against Older Tech Employees? Many of the Bay Area's tech companies are populated by young employees in their 20s and 30s. "Young people are just smarter," Mark Zuckerberg said back in 2007, noting they have "simpler lives," without having to spend time on partners or kids. Now job applicants in their 50s and 60s are reporting that they color gray hairs, wear Converse sneakers, and get cosmetic surgery to compete with a younger work force. Is age discrimination a real problem in the Bay Area tech world?
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Gay Service Members Plan Their Weddings Many gay service members are planning their weddings. The program discusses how, for the first time, their spouses will get the same benefits as straight military spouses.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Why Bacteria Can be Good for Us The program discusses the latest research that shows bacteria can be good for us. Bacteria can play a critical role in fighting obesity, diabetes, and auto-immune diseases.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Simon Pegg and Nick Frost Guest host Dave Davies speaks with actors Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. Their new comedy, "The World's End," is about five high school friends who reunite to finish a pub crawl they began 20 years earlier. It's the third film of the trilogy that includes "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz."
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Sequester's Effect on National Parks Going camping now means having to take out the trash you bring in. The program discusses the sequester's effect on U.S. national parks.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Iowa Citys Local Music Project -- Last year the Iowa City Public Library launched a Local Music Project. The library built a front end to sign bands and negotiate license fees. It paid $100 per album that gives library patrons the right to download and own local music. The program discusses how artists love it, patrons love it and they library is getting money to expand it
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Sequester's Effect on National Parks Going camping now means having to take out the trash you bring in. The program discusses the sequester's effect on U.S. national parks.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Simon Pegg and Nick Frost Guest host Dave Davies speaks with actors Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. Their new comedy, "The World's End," is about five high school friends who reunite to finish a pub crawl they began 20 years earlier. It's the third film of the trilogy that includes "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz."
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials America Abroad Syria and the Responsibility to Protect -- The civil war in Syria rages on, and by all accounts, it is a grave humanitarian crisis. The Obama administration has come under steady criticism for failing to do more to stop the violence. The program reviews the application of the "Responsibility to Protect" in cases of conflict during the post-Cold War period. The "Responsibility to Protect," or "R-to-P," is an international principle that was codified by the United Nations in 2005. It's based on the premise that every government has a responsibility to protect its citizenry from atrocities or mass murder. Anchor Madeleine Brand examines how the U.S. and the international community have responded to humanitarian crises around the globe -- from Somalia and Rwanda to Bosnia and Libya.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum New Efforts Put Pressure on Parents to Vaccinate Kids Bay Area students are heading back to school this month amid news that an increasing number of parents have opted not to vaccinate their kids. The number of unvaccinated children in California has tripled in the last decade. Nearly 10 percent of kindergartners statewide last year didn't have all of their required immunizations. In Marin Country, only 82 percent of kindergartners were fully vaccinated. To fight this trend, a Marin pediatric practice with 8,000 patients has refused to treat those who aren't vaccinated, public health officials have launched information campaign and a new state law requires parents to consult with a doctor before opting out of vaccines. A well-known bio-ethicist is even proposing lawsuits against parents who refuse to immunize. We talk about efforts to pressure parents to vaccinate their kids. Why are vaccination opt-out rates rising? Will efforts to turn the tide work?
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Challenging Texas Voter ID Law The Justice Department is suing the state of Texas over its strict voter ID law, saying it discriminates against minorities. The program discusses how the attorney general also wants a judge to order Texas to get federal permission before it changes its election procedures.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered More Mortgage Fraud Cases Are federal prosecutors gearing up to file more big mortgage fraud cases? Bank of America was targeted recently and JP Morgan Chase has disclosed that it is under investigation. What's driving the renewed interest five years after the housing market imploded?
Thursday, August 22, 2013

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