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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, July 10, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, July 10, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered New Privacy Board Hears Testimony A former judge for the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court raised questions about the court's approval of government data collection programs on Tuesday. He was testifying before the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, an independent agency considering recently uncovered surveillance efforts. The program discusses the board and its role.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures The Science of Love & Attraction with Helen Fisher Helen E. Fisher is a research professor in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University. She argues that humans have evolved three core brain systems for mating and reproduction. "Love can start off with any of these three feelings," Fisher maintains. "Some people fall head over heels in love, but the sex drive evolved to encourage you to seek a range of partners; romantic love evolved to enable you to focus your mating energy on just one at a time; and attachment evolved to enable you to feel deep union to this person long enough to rear your infants as a team." What happens when you fall in love? Helen Fisher appeared in conversation with Michael Krasny on June 4, 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Turning Emergency Patients into Primary Care Patients Hospitals know one way to save money -- convince patients who frequently use the emergency room to see a doctor instead for basic health care. The program discusses how the state of Oregon has more than $1 billion in federal money to solve this problem.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Preparing for the Next Transit Crisis The recent BART strike gave Bay Area commuters a taste of what happens when we lose a major segment of our transit system. So what would happen if more than one system shut down, or if there was a major earthquake? The transit advocacy group SPUR warns that our transportation systems are already at capacity and aren't set to handle rapid population growth. SPUR executive director Gabriel Metcalf joins us to discuss how the Bay Area can become more resilient, and better prepared for the next disruption.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Adopting Flexible Work Schedules for Families Five months after Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer banned employees from working from home, San Francisco Supervisor David Chiu is proposing a family-friendly workplace rule that he says would help families balance work and home life. Employees who are parents and caregivers could request a flexible work schedule, including job sharing, telecommuting, or part-time employment. But business owners and other critics say the government shouldn't intrude on how they run their companies. Should San Francisco be the first city in the nation to enact a flexible work provision?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Is the Bay Area Too Dog Friendly? The Bay Area is known for being a dog-loving region, but has our canine adoration reached an unhealthy level? Dogs now accompany us into grocery stores, cafes, and even offices, but some argue that we're excessively spoiling our dogs at the expense of others. We discuss whether our region really has a dog-coddling problem.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Unlikely Literary Blends The program discusses how a new book blends Star Wars and Shakespeare. What would the Bard have thought?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway The Long Road to Democracy in the Middle East How do you create a democracy, for the people and by the people, in a region in turmoil? The program looks at the long road to democracy in the Middle East - and the road blocks along the way.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Food and Emotion Guest host Dave Davies speaks with novelist Kate Christensen. Her memoir, "Blue Plate Special," opens with a scary scene at her childhood breakfast table, where an engaging story about food and emotion unfolds. The show also hears from health writer Jo Robinson. In her new book, "Eating on the Wild Side," she explains why we'd be better off eating a little more like our prehistoric ancestors.
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Safety Net Confessionals On the next installment of the program's "Safety Net Confessionals" series, one Michigan man says his safety net is hard work and sacrifice.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered Boston Marathon Bomber in Court
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Suspected Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokar Tsarnaev was arraigned on Wednesday. Tsarnaev has been indicted on more than 30 charges, including using a weapon of mass destruction in the attack, which killed three people and injured more than 260. He is also charged with the murder of MIT police officer Sean Collier. Wednesday's court proceeding were Tsarnaev's first public appearance since he was captured four days after the bombings. The program covers the case.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Safety Net Confessionals On the next installment of the program's "Safety Net Confessionals" series, one Michigan man says his safety net is hard work and sacrifice.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Food and Emotion Guest host Dave Davies speaks with novelist Kate Christensen. Her memoir, "Blue Plate Special," opens with a scary scene at her childhood breakfast table, where an engaging story about food and emotion unfolds. The show also hears from health writer Jo Robinson. In her new book, "Eating on the Wild Side," she explains why we'd be better off eating a little more like our prehistoric ancestors.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Burn: An Energy Journal The Switch -- The nation's power grid, the patchwork system that transmits and distributes electricity from plants to consumers, is aging and stretched to capacity -- especially in summer months when users face triple-digit temperatures, violent storms and power outages. The program examines the state of America's electric power grid and the science needed to modernize it. Can 21st century electrical engineers use "smart grid" technology to prevent power outages? What are the challenges involved in linking new sources of energy, such as wind and solar, to the grid?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Is the Bay Area Too Dog Friendly? The Bay Area is known for being a dog-loving region, but has our canine adoration reached an unhealthy level? Dogs now accompany us into grocery stores, cafes, and even offices, but some argue that we're excessively spoiling our dogs at the expense of others. We discuss whether our region really has a dog-coddling problem.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Military and Minorities in Egypt In Egypt, religious minorities are embracing the ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, as attacks on Coptic Christians and Shiite Muslims escalated during his year in office. The program discusses how the military, however, has had a checkered reputation of its own, killing and imprisoning minorities during past rule. The program also speaks with Steven Cook of theCouncil of Foreign Relations about the current and historical role of the Egyptian military in politics.
  • 12:00 am
Wednesday, July 10, 2013

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