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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, July 9, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, July 9, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Overseeing Intelligence Contractors By some estimates, half of the U.S. government's intelligence spending goes to private contractors, such as Booz Allen Hamilton. Edward Snowden, the National Security Agency leaker, says he took a job at Booz Allen because he saw it as the best place to gather the intelligence secrets he wanted to expose. Some members of Congress say the episode underscores the need for greater oversight of intelligence contractors and they are calling for hearings into the matter.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Saudi Arabia: Present and Future Saudi Arabia is one of the last absolute monarchies. Healthcare and education are free, but women still lack the right to drive or take on most jobs. As the country's ruling princes age and succession becomes imminent, how might the current situation change? Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Karen House argues that the majority of Saudis do not want democracy per se, but more transparency and a government based on law instead of royal fiat. She discusses Saudi Arabia's future and political challenges ahead.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition A New Board to Protect Americans' Privacy A new government board is monitoring threats to Americans' privacy, including the NSA's secret surveillance programs. The program discusses a new board trying to protect Americans' privacy, while the NSA faces new scrutiny.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum A Close Look at Long-Term Isolation in State Prison On Monday, prisoners in special security units at Pelican Bay State Prison will begin a hunger strike. These inmates, who have spent between 10 and 28 years in isolation, are demanding that changes be made to the prison's special housing units, where they spend almost all their time alone. They claim that long-term isolation amounts to cruel and unusual punishment, and that prisoners are sometimes locked in these units for insubstantial reasons. We discuss these issues with a former inmate, the Department of Corrections, an investigative reporter, and a lawyer representing the prisoners in a class action federal lawsuit. The Center for Investigative Reporting and The California Report will feature in-depth series on this topic this week.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum The Skyjacking Epidemic: 1968-1972 In 1968, and for five years after, commercial jets were hijacked nearly once a week. Journalist Brendan Koerner tells the story of this criminal epidemic, focusing on the madcap story of a young couple who pulled off the longest distance hijacking in U.S. history. Forum talks with Koerner about the radical 1970s, the country's skyjacking epidemic, and the evolution of aviation security at the time.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Peter Gabriel's Interspecies Internet The program discusses how musician Peter Gabriel wants to create an interspecies internet -- something new and primal, as he found when he played a computer keyboard with a chimpanzee.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Reporter Alfredo Corchado: 'Midnight in Mexico' Guest host Dave Davies speaks with journalist Alfredo Corchado, the Mexico bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News who covers issues affecting both sides of the border such as immigration and the reach of drug violence. He's received numerous death threats for his work covering the drug cartels. His new memoir is entitled "Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent into Darkness."
  • 2:00 pm
    World A Culture War in Jerusalem The program discusses how Ultra-Orthodox Israelis have been boycotting a shopping mall in Jerusalem. The stores have tried lowering prices, and even raising necklines. Community members, however, say the mall is too secular -- so they're not shopping.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Redistributing Power Among Markets The program discusses how government instability in places like Brazil and Turkey is forcing a redistribution of power among emerging markets.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Summer Reading -- Summer reading means something different to everyone. For some, a vacation means they finally have time to dig into that 1,000-page biography they've been hearing so much about. Others see it as a time to indulge their guilty pleasures: Romance novels, mysteries and science fiction. And some have been dying to curl up with latest literary novel by their favorite author. The program speaks with three book critics to find what they are reading this summer.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Redistributing Power Among Markets The program discusses how government instability in places like Brazil and Turkey is forcing a redistribution of power among emerging markets.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Reporter Alfredo Corchado: 'Midnight in Mexico' Guest host Dave Davies speaks with journalist Alfredo Corchado, the Mexico bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News who covers issues affecting both sides of the border such as immigration and the reach of drug violence. He's received numerous death threats for his work covering the drug cartels. His new memoir is entitled "Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent into Darkness."
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures The Science of Love & Attraction with Helen Fisher Helen E. Fisher is a research professor in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University. She argues that humans have evolved three core brain systems for mating and reproduction. "Love can start off with any of these three feelings," Fisher maintains. "Some people fall head over heels in love, but the sex drive evolved to encourage you to seek a range of partners; romantic love evolved to enable you to focus your mating energy on just one at a time; and attachment evolved to enable you to feel deep union to this person long enough to rear your infants as a team." What happens when you fall in love? Helen Fisher appeared in conversation with Michael Krasny on June 4, 2013.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum The Skyjacking Epidemic: 1968-1972 In 1968, and for five years after, commercial jets were hijacked nearly once a week. Journalist Brendan Koerner tells the story of this criminal epidemic, focusing on the madcap story of a young couple who pulled off the longest distance hijacking in U.S. history. Forum talks with Koerner about the radical 1970s, the country's skyjacking epidemic, and the evolution of aviation security at the time.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Was There a "Coup" in Egypt? Was the change in Egypt's government a coup or not? For members of the U.S. Congress, the difference is more than a question of semantics. U.S. law requires that aid be cut off to a country that undergoes a military coup -- which, if it were to happen in the case of Egypt, would bring on dramatic consequences.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered New Privacy Board Hears Testimony A former judge for the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court raised questions about the court's approval of government data collection programs on Tuesday. He was testifying before the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, an independent agency considering recently uncovered surveillance efforts. The program discusses the board and its role.
Tuesday, July 9, 2013

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