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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, July 6, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, July 6, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Searching Midwest Rivers for Runoff Across the Corn Belt this summer, scientists are wading into 100 streams to collect water samples and check cages for fish eggs. In the first-of-its kind study, they're testing the impact of hundreds of pesticides and nutrients used in farming on fish, frogs, bugs and algae. It's a pressing concern now because of the wet spring and last year's drought, which prevented some parched crops from absorbing fertilizers. The streams empty into rivers and reservoirs that provide the drinking water for much of the Midwest.
  • 1:00 am
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week 2013 Mid-Tear Report Card President Obama is just six months into his second term and for most of that time his ambitious agenda has been overshadowed by a number of unexpected events and controversies. From the attention on gun legislation in the wake of the Newtown school shooting, to the string of controversies involving the IRS, Justice Department and NSA leaker Edward Snowden, the program discusses how the president seems to be facing hurdles and distractions at every turn.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club Governors Ritter and Whitman: Risk and Resilience Hurricane Sandy and the devastating Colorado fires of 2012 underscore the idea that climate disruption is amplifying natural disasters, if not causing them. Hurricane Sandy and other disasters last year caused more than $100 billion in damage. Politicians are grappling with who bears those costs and whether and how areas such as the Jersey Shore should be rebuilt.What lessons do the fires and storms of 2012 present for other states? What does climate science say about the probability of similar disasters? Join a conversation with two former state chief executives - former Colorado Governor Bill Ritter and former New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman -- about learning from recent disasters and marshaling political will to confront the climate reality.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe Should Europe Protect Edward Snowden? It's been two weeks since Edward Snowden flew from Hong Kong to Moscow in a bid to find a country which would offer him asylum. In echoes of the Cold War, some of the most unlikely countries on the planet have been touted as offering him potential asylum, whilst the American spy who came in from the cold, has watched and waited from Moscow's warm embrace. Meanwhile, the game "where's Snowden" has intensified, as the world tries to guess where he will eventually end up, or whether the now stateless man will be handed back to the U.S. authorities.
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Chris Anderson: The Maker Revolution Many are looking to the United States for its known potential to reinvent, reinvigorate and revitalize economic and political reality. How will the U.S. harness innovation and regain its competitive edge? Chris Anderson, co-founder of 3D Robotics and former editor for Wired, will focus on innovation in terms of the new technology driven industrial revolution. Today's entrepreneurs, using open source design and 3-D printing, are bringing manufacturing to the desktop. This Do It Yourself (DIY) movement coupled with social networking is creating a new world of crowd-sourced design and production. What are the implications of the worldwide Maker revolution?
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The Best of Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life Taking Names The program shares the incredible story of Kirk Johnson, who started a list of hundreds of Iraqis who needed to get out of their country. They were getting death threats, and he was their only hope. Only 26 and living in his aunt's basement, he had no idea what to do. How did Kirk succeed spectacularly -- and fail spectacularly -- at the same time?
  • 1:00 pm
    Radio Specials Freakonomics Radio The Truth is Out There, Isn't It? -- The program looks at the strange moments when knowledge is not power. Issues like gun control, nuclear power, vaccinations, and climate change consistently divide the public along ideological lines. If the issues were explained better, would it help? Host Stephen Dubner looks into the puzzle of why learning more only makes people more stubborn. And the show looks into conspiracy theories to see how people form their own version of the truth -- even when the data contradict it.
  • 2:00 pm
    Moyers & Company Surviving the New American Economy Twenty-two years ago, Bill Moyers started documenting the story of two ordinary families in Milwaukee, Wisconsin -- families whose breadwinners had lost well-paying factory jobs. Relying on the belief that hard work is the key to a good living and better life, the Stanleys and the Neumanns, like millions of others, went about pursuing the American dream. But as they found other jobs, got re-trained, and worked any time and overtime, they still found themselves on a downward slope, working harder and longer for less pay and fewer benefits, facing devastating challenges and difficult choices. The program revisits the reports on the Stanleys and Neumanns, The show also speaks with the authors of two important books about how the changing nature of the economy is affecting everyone, Barbara Miner author of "Lessons from the Heartland: A Turbulent Half-Century of Public Education in an Iconic American City;" and Barbara Garson, author of "Down the Up Escalator: How the 99% Live in the Great Recession."
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Living On Earth Explaining the World's Dramatic Population Increase The United Nations recently issued a report that anticipates world population will reach 9.6 billion people by 2050, an increase from previous projections. The program speaks with Robert Engelman from the Worldwatch Institute about the factors causing this dramatic population increase. Also, while all eyes are focused on the Keystone XL pipeline, the program discusses how the oil company Enbridge is quietly planning to expand a web of other pipelines to bring Alberta Tar Sands oil to ports.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion Oiseaux Tristes The program airs a show originally broadcast from The Town Hall in New York City on April 9, 2005. Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks plays "You Shake That Thing," Odetta sings the "Weeping Willow Blues," pianist Andre Watts performs Chopin's "Nocturne in C Sharp Minor," and Andy Stein joins The Guy's All-Star Shoe Band on fiddle and saxophone. And in Lake Wobegon, the high school prom coincides with the local farmers' manure-spreading week.
  • 8:30 pm
    Selected Shorts Music and a Minotaur Nate Corddry reads "Customer Service at the Karaoke Don Quixote" by Juan Martinez; and Tim Curry reads "Ziggurat" by Stephen O'Connor.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life Taking Names The program shares the incredible story of Kirk Johnson, who started a list of hundreds of Iraqis who needed to get out of their country. They were getting death threats, and he was their only hope. Only 26 and living in his aunt's basement, he had no idea what to do. How did Kirk succeed spectacularly -- and fail spectacularly -- at the same time?
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour Milton, Mary Kay and Dognapping An evangelist searches for souls and customers in the aisles of a Target store; an adolescent money-making scheme is hatched in 1970s Spanish Harlem; filmmaker Albert Maysles ("Gimme Shelter," "Grey Gardens") pays tribute to his father; and Dan Kennedy has an unforgettable therapy session with a social worker named Milton.
  • 11:00 pm
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • 12:00 am
Saturday, July 6, 2013

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