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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, June 27, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, June 27, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe Being postmaster general was once a premiere political post. Today, it means uncomfortably straddling the business and government worlds without being either. The program speaks with Patrick Donahoe, the beleaguered postmaster general who is trying to get the quasi-government agency back to fiscal health and battling Congress all the way.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials State of the Re:Union with Al Letson Back to the Basics - An American Graduate Special -- The program's "American Graduate" coverage concludes with a special episode exploring school, community, and the dropout crisis in this country. The program shares personal stories of failure and success at school, talks to experts on why kids drop out and what makes them stay, and reports on innovations in teaching and learning -- from the Missouri Ozarks to Brooklyn, New York.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition A Historic Day at the Supreme Court Wednesday was a historic day at the U.S. Supreme Court, as the justices overturned the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), ruling that same-sex married couples should receive the same federal benefits as heterosexual couples. And another ruling will likely clear the way for same-sex couples to marry in California. The program discusses the Supreme Court's decisions -- and their impact on same-sex couples.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum BART Workers Authorize Strike Unions representing over 2,000 BART employees voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to authorize a strike, which could begin as early as Monday, potentially affecting hundreds of thousands of daily commuters. The employees are demanding wage and cost-of-living increases. BART, meanwhile, wants workers to contribute to pensions, pay more for health insurance and reduce overtime expenses. Unions also filed a lawsuit earlier this week alleging unfair labor practices, accusing BART of refusing to bargain in good faith over worker safety.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum License Plate Readers Gather Millions of Records on Drivers In the wake of revelations about the NSA's secret surveillance programs, more information is coming forth about how police departments store the data they collect from license plate readers. Mounted on police cars, the devices can log photos of thousands of license plates in a single day's shift. The Center for Investigative Reporting found that millions of these records are being stored in local intelligence fusion centers, one of which is funded by a Silicon Valley firm with ties to the Pentagon and the CIA. Supporters say the license plate data help law enforcement catch criminals -- but others say the photos are a violation of privacy and make it easy to track law-abiding citizens.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum The Secrets to a Successful Marriage This week's U.S. Supreme Court decisions on same-sex unions have thrust the institution of marriage into the spotlight. We talk about the latest research on the keys to wedded bliss. Whether you're straight or gay, what does marriage mean to you? What are the secrets to a happy and fulfilling union? Or if you're divorced or getting over a failed relationship, what did you learn about what makes a great partnership?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air On Being African in America Host Terry Gross speaks with Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie about her new semi-autobiographical novel, "Americanah." Growing up in Nigeria, Adichie wasn't defined by her race. When she came to America to attend college, she found herself in the middle of racial conflicts she didn't understand. She discusses how being African in America compares with being African-American.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Aquaponics in Africa A fish farm in Uganda was losing money, so its owner tried something new: hydroponic vegetables, grown in nutrient-rich water from the fish farm. He pays the bills each month by selling the vegetables, and when the fish are fully grown, he sells them too. Now he's convincing other Ugandans to give it a try.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Goodbye, Lonely Action Hero The program discusses why film studios are moving away from the lonely action hero, and angling towards dynamic duos instead.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Student Loan Rates Set to Rise -- Student loan rates are set to double on Monday, with Congress not likely to take action before then. The debate now is on how to lower costs for students without needing annual stopgap bills. Such a measure would not pass until mid-July at the earliest, and would have to be applied retroactively to undo the coming rate hike.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Goodbye, Lonely Action Hero The program discusses why film studios are moving away from the lonely action hero, and angling towards dynamic duos instead.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air On Being African in America Host Terry Gross speaks with Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie about her new semi-autobiographical novel, "Americanah." Growing up in Nigeria, Adichie wasn't defined by her race. When she came to America to attend college, she found herself in the middle of racial conflicts she didn't understand. She discusses how being African in America compares with being African-American.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Hearing Voices Stories of Transformation: Character and Change -- Miles has the wrong body. He was born a woman, Megan. After 15 years of serious depression and confusion about his place in the world, at age 28, he decided to make a change. He chose the name Miles and began his slow, difficult transition into manhood. All along the way, he carried an audio recorder with him. The show also hears the story of Louis, who robbed people for most of his high school career. He did it for money and for thrills. He never got caught. Then, in his senior year, he decided to stop. Louis talks to friends and family, and to himself, about why he was a criminal, and why he needs to change. The program shares two audio diaries of these two people, Miles and Louis, documenting their own personal transformation.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum The Secrets to a Successful Marriage This week's U.S. Supreme Court decisions on same-sex unions have thrust the institution of marriage into the spotlight. We talk about the latest research on the keys to wedded bliss. Whether you're straight or gay, what does marriage mean to you? What are the secrets to a happy and fulfilling union? Or if you're divorced or getting over a failed relationship, what did you learn about what makes a great partnership?
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered President Obama's Africa Trip President Obama began his trip to Africa in Senegal. On Thursday, he met with Senegalese President Macky Sall and toured Goree Island -- the UNESCO site once a point for the Atlantic slave trade that now serves as a place of pilgrimage.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered One Year in Office: Egypt's Mohammed Morsi On Sunday, it'll be one year since Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was sworn into office. His leadership has polarized the country and Egyptians face rising food prices, fuel shortages and power cuts just as the long hot summer takes hold. The program discusses how opposition groups have planned major protests to mark the day, demanding early elections and vowing to remain on the streets until Morsi quits power.
Thursday, June 27, 2013

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