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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, June 24, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, June 24, 2013
  • 12:00 am
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA Tackling the GOP's Latino Problem The program discusses a report on the GOP's Congressional split over how to fix immigration, and hosts a roundtable discussion on the severed Latino/Republican relationship. The show also shares words of encouragement for the Mexican-American boy who sang the national anthem at the NBA finals Mariachi style and later received a wave of racist remarks. And it pays tribute to Arturo Vega, the so-called fifth member of the punk band The Ramones, who died earlier this month.
  • 1:30 am
    Cambridge Forum The Banjo Project, Part Two Marc Fields, Tony Trischka, and Darol Anger continue their exploration of the banjo. With a lively narrative and masterful performances, they explore the developing performance styles of the drum with strings. From ladies parlor songs to contemporary jazz, the banjo has accommodated an evolving repertory for new audiences and a stellar set of performers.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Intern Rights What do Atlantic Records, The New Yorker, and Fox Searchlight Pictures have in common? They've all been accused of exploiting unpaid interns. There's been a rash of lawsuits in the past couple months and the charges are pretty much the same: interns working overtime doing menial tasks like making coffee, organizing cabinets, and running errands for creative types. Not exactly the kind of "vocational" training internships are supposed to be about. Almost a third of college students take unpaid internships now -- but it's not always clear how to get something meaningful out of the experience. Lauren Berger, author of the book "All Work, No Pay" and the blog "Intern Queen," discusses intern rights with guest host Sarah Gardner.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Private Eye Easy Rawlins Private eye Easy Rawlins is one of Los Angeles' best-loved fictional residents. Author Walter Mosley joins the program and gives a guided tour of the historically African-American neighborhoods where his mysteries take place. The program's "Crime in the City" series visits Easy Rawlins' Los Angeles.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Robert Kaiser: Act of Congress Why is Congress so helpless and so hopeless? That's the question Robert Kaiser investigates in his new book, "Act of Congress: How America's Essential Institution Works, and How It Doesn't." The longtime Washington Post correspondent tells the story of the financial reform bill, known as the Dodd-Frank Act, and its journey through Congress, and what the passage -- or failure to pass -- a bill says about our larger democracy today.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Khaled Hosseini: And the Mountains Echoed Khaled Hosseini transported readers to his native Afghanistan with his best-selling novels "The Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns." He returns with a new novel, "And the Mountains Echoed." Spanning over 50 years, the book portrays Afghanistan through the lens of a family coping with separation and tragedy. Hosseini joins us to discuss the book, as well as the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday What We Wear, and What it Says About Us The clothes we wear, how we style our hair and the accessories we choose all say something about who we are. For example, African American traditional choices are grounded and shaped by influences from the legacy of slavery to the importance of faith. The program talks about what we wear -- and what it says about us,
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Questlove Guest host Dave Davies speaks with Amir Questlove Thompson, the drummer and co-founder of The Roots. They're the house band for Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, and are preparing for the move, along with Fallon, to the Tonight Show in February. Questlove has a new memoir about his life and obsessions, including Soul Train and his collection of 70,000 records -- which he knows the beats-per-minute of every track.
  • 2:00 pm
    World International Actors in the Edward Snowden Case The program discusses the roles played by Wikileaks, Ecuador and China in Edward Snowden's flight from Hong Kong. The show also explores how concerns over soaring greenhouse gas emissions in China are spurring a growing Vegan movement.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Author James Patterson The program speaks with author James Patterson, who has written more than 100 books in every genre -- from children's tales to crime thrillers.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    The Flight of Edward Snowden -- The U.S. is urging countries around the world to return a former intelligence contractor, who was last seen in Hong Kong. The State Department revoked Edward Snowden's passport, but the man accused of releasing American secrets is on the run. And there seem to be plenty of countries, including Russia, willing to hide him in spite of U.S. appeals.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Author James Patterson The program speaks with author James Patterson, who has written more than 100 books in every genre -- from children's tales to crime thrillers.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Questlove Guest host Dave Davies speaks with Amir Questlove Thompson, the drummer and co-founder of The Roots. They're the house band for Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, and are preparing for the move, along with Fallon, to the Tonight Show in February. Questlove has a new memoir about his life and obsessions, including Soul Train and his collection of 70,000 records -- which he knows the beats-per-minute of every track.
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Fostering Democracy in Burma As political prisoners have been released and U.S. sanctions lifted, Burma has seen signs of improving democratic values and rising economic indicators. Tom Malinowski, Washington director of Human Rights Watch, has been part of the effort to bring Burma into the diplomatic fold. He discusses his recent trip to Burma and what to expect in this new and fragile democracy.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Robert Kaiser: Act of Congress Why is Congress so helpless and so hopeless? That's the question Robert Kaiser investigates in his new book, "Act of Congress: How America's Essential Institution Works, and How It Doesn't." The longtime Washington Post correspondent tells the story of the financial reform bill, known as the Dodd-Frank Act, and its journey through Congress, and what the passage -- or failure to pass -- a bill says about our larger democracy today.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Common Core State Standards Backlash Forty-six states plus the District of Columbia have signed on to the Common Core State Standards -- a new, nationwide set of K-12 standards meant to make sure a student in Chicago is reaching the same learning benchmarks as a student in Seattle or Miami. But with implementation has come a conservative backlash. The program explores the Core and why some conservatives can't stand it.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered George Zimmerman Trial Opens Opening statements started Monday in the trial of George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer charged with killing unarmed teen Trayvon Martin. The program reports on the trial from Sanford, Florida.
Monday, June 24, 2013

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