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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, May 14, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Vietnam's Demand for Rhino Horn Drives Poaching The use of rhino horn as Chinese traditional medicine is the main driver of the global trade and slaughter. Much of the demand appears to be coming from Vietnam, where a small group of elites use rhino horn for everything from a hangover remedy to a potential cure for cancer. Never mind that rhino horn -- like fingernails -- is agglutinated hair and has no medicinal value. In China, by contrast, rhino horn is increasingly used for carvings and is even becoming an asset class, with Chinese buying rhino horn as an investment -- betting on continued slaughter and even extinction. The program speaks with rhino horn users and traditional medicine practitioners on the beliefs that are driving the slaughter.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) The Energy Mix: The Outlook for the Next 30 Years The energy mix is evolving, and so is the world in which energy is supplied and consumed. Major progress is being made in developing oil, gas, renewable and other clean energy resources, but the increase in population coupled with the industrialization of developing countries will cause energy demand to more than double by mid-century. The international community is grappling with the trade-offs between development and the environment, and climate change has fundamentally shifted the nature and urgency of the debate. What is a realistic view of the energy mix over the next 30 years and what are the roles for fossil fuels, renewables and nuclear? The program hosts a panel discussion of the outlook for the global energy mix over the next 30 years. Guests include: Amy Myers Jaffe, executive director of energy and sustainability at the Graduate School of Management and the Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis; Daniel Kammen, director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory, UC Berkeley; and Matt Rogers, director of McKinsey & Company's San Francisco office.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Rescued from Somali Pirates International aid worker Jessica Buchanan was kidnapped by Somali pirates and held for months, until Navy SEALs launched a raid to free her. Now she and her husband have written a book about their experience, entitled "Impossible Odds." Jessica Buchanan joins the program to discuss how she was rescued from pirates.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Upheaval at Oakland Police Department Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan unexpectedly resigned last week, citing medical reasons. His replacement as interim chief stepped down two days later. The turmoil in the department comes in the midst of two reports critical of Oakland police. One report from a court-ordered overseer finds OPD out of compliance with federally mandated reforms from a decade-old police brutality case. Another report, by law enforcement consultant William Bratton, is critical of the department's ability to reduce crime. Forum takes up these issues with the newly appointed Interim Police Chief Sean Whent and others.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum The Classics, Revisited The great literary classics are more than merely important works of art, says author Kevin Smokler. Books that have stood the test of time should also provide insight into "how to live a great life." In his new book, "Practical Classics," Smokler advocates re-reading those oft-assigned tomes like "Candide," "Huckleberry Finn," and "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." We talk with Smokler, and we want to hear from you: what makes a book worthy of revisiting?
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday The Legacy of the Korean War Called in as the United States and UN Forces faced disaster in Korea, General Matthew Ridgeway recaptured Seoul, drove Chinese and North Korean troops to the 38th Parallel, and averted a nuclear war. But his legacy includes an intact North Korea. The program speaks with Victor Davis Hanson and General Bernard Trainor about the U.S. war in Korea.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig Host Terry Gross speaks with filmmaker Noah Baumbach and actress Greta Gerwig. They co-wrote the new film, "Frances Ha," about a young woman in New York City struggling toward adulthood. Gerwig also starred in Baumbach's film, "Greenberg." His other films include "The Squid and the Whale," "Margot at the Wedding," and "Kicking and Screaming."
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Poultry Industry's Demand for Immigrant Labor Packing frozen chickens on an assembly line can be dangerous and pay little. Few Americans apply for the job, but a steady flow of immigrants is ready to work. The program discusses why the poultry industry still relies on an immigrant workforce -- and why some of those immigrant workers are opting out.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Beyond Payday Loans For the second installment of their "Beyond Payday Loans" series, the program describes how some installment loan providers profit from lending money to customers they know will struggle to pay back the loans.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Beyond Payday Loans For the second installment of their "Beyond Payday Loans" series, the program describes how some installment loan providers profit from lending money to customers they know will struggle to pay back the loans.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig Host Terry Gross speaks with filmmaker Noah Baumbach and actress Greta Gerwig. They co-wrote the new film, "Frances Ha," about a young woman in New York City struggling toward adulthood. Gerwig also starred in Baumbach's film, "Greenberg." His other films include "The Squid and the Whale," "Margot at the Wedding," and "Kicking and Screaming."
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Author Michael Lewis Last year, author Michael Lewis spent six months with President Obama. Lewis turned that unprecedented access -- in the Oval Office, on the basketball court, and even in the private quarters of the White House -- into a fascinating and intimate portrait for Vanity Fair magazine. A contributing editor to the magazine, Lewis is known for meticulous research on far reaching subjects. His most recent book, "Boomerang: The Meltdown Tour," chronicles the fiscal recklessness in both Europe and the U.S. that led to the current international debt crisis. Past works include "Liars Poker," "The Blind Side," "Moneyball," and "The Big Short." He appeared in conversation with Dacher Keltner on May 1, 2013 at the Nourse Theatre.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Upheaval at Oakland Police Department Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan unexpectedly resigned last week, citing medical reasons. His replacement as interim chief stepped down two days later. The turmoil in the department comes in the midst of two reports critical of Oakland police. A report from a court-ordered overseer finds OPD out of compliance with federally mandated reforms from a decade-old police brutality case. Another report, by law enforcement consultant William Bratton, is critical of the department's ability to reduce crime. Forum takes up these issues with the newly appointed Interim Police Chief Sean Whent and others, including San Francisco staff writer Matthai Kuruvila and civil rights attorney John Burris.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Underground Living in Tijuana After living underground in the United States, some undocumented immigrants deported to the Mexican border city of Tijuana have been driven -- quite literally -- underground. They're living in holes along Tijuana's sewage canal. The program discusses how these migrants have dug bunkers to protect themselves from police who routinely burn down migrants' makeshift homes.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Most Durable Bat Boy For 55 years, Stan Bronson, Jr. has been the "bat boy" for University of Memphis baseball team. Guinness World Records has deemed him the "most durable bat boy." The program reports on his final game of the year.
Tuesday, May 14, 2013

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