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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, May 13, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, May 13, 2013
  • 12:00 am
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA For Bullets, It's Open Borders The program visits Postville, Iowa, which five years ago was the site of the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Then, it looks for answers on why U.S border patrol agents are shooting into Mexico and killing innocent civilians. The show also presents a Mother's Day commentary on the decision to become - or not to become - a mom, and goes to a trailer park in Duroville, California where most its farmworker residents are leaving for newer housing.
  • 1:30 am
    Cambridge Forum American Passage: Immigration Then and Now Historian Vincent Cannato discusses his history of Ellis Island with political scientist Paul Watanabe. Watanabe's research examines contemporary immigration trends as a counterpoint to Cannato's historical research. How has the immigrant experience changed since Ellis Island was the key entry point to the United States? What are the nation's expectations from immigrants today, as compared with a century ago?
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Is College a Waste of Money? The program discusses the issue of wasting money. We don't just waste it on small items, like lottery tickets - we also throw money away on big items, like education. The program speaks with some who believe their costly college education wasn't worth it, and with others who've chosen alternative paths to education.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Former Senator Olympia Snowe Former Senator Olympia Snowe was one of the few moderate Republicans in Congress, and says the Senate has become a place where politics trumps problem-solving. She joins the program to discuss her new book about ending stalemate in Congress.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Landmark Elections in Pakistan Pakistan's general election on May 11th marks the first successful transition from one democratically elected parliament to another in the nation's 66-year history. But with more than 100 people killed, the election run-up has been blighted by violence. In another sign of mounting tensions, Pakistan's Interior Ministry has ordered the expulsion of The New York Times bureau chief in Islamabad. We'll discuss the election, and what it signifies for Pakistan.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum David Kirp's Strategy for Public Schools In rebuilding our public schools, education policy expert David Kirp says we should stick to what works, like quality early-childhood education and creating word-rich curriculums. In other words, avoid getting carried away by quick fixes and the latest trends. His new book, "Improbable Scholars," tells the success story of Union City, New Jersey, and argues that all our public schools can benefit from what was learned there.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Compelling Courtroom Drama The Jodi Arias trial gripped millions across the country -- a lurid soap opera come to life that resulted in record ratings for cable channel HLN, which covered the case around the clock. Novelists Walter Mosely and Laura Lippman join the program to talk about what's so compelling about courtroom drama,
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Robert Caro: 'The Passage of Power' Guest host Dave Davies speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Robert Caro. He's written the fourth part of his biography of Lyndon Johnson, "The Passage of Power," which covers the years 1959-1964 -- a period when Johnson goes from being the Senate majority leader to a vice president with little power, and then the presidency after the assassination of President Kennedy.
  • 2:00 pm
    World A Long, Perilous Walk to School Students at a South African high school face many dangers. But the threats are not in their school - they're on their way to school, through some lawless neighborhoods. The program joins one student on his long, perilous walk to school
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Potential Pitfalls of Installment Loans Most of us know the potential pitfalls of payday loans, but what about installment loans? The lesser-known consumer financial products can hook borrowers for years.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    The President's Second Term Curse? -- The second term curse has plagued the last five two-term presidents, but President Obama's administration had been confident they'd be the ones to break the streak. However, as the program discusses, the administration now finds itself on the defensive about last year's attack in Benghazi and current allegations that the IRS targeted Tea Party groups.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Potential Pitfalls of Installment Loans Most of us know the potential pitfalls of payday loans, but what about installment loans? The lesser-known consumer financial products can hook borrowers for years.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Robert Caro: 'The Passage of Power' Guest host Dave Davies speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Robert Caro. He's written the fourth part of his biography of Lyndon Johnson, "The Passage of Power," which covers the years 1959-1964 -- a period when Johnson goes from being the Senate majority leader to a vice president with little power, and then the presidency after the assassination of President Kennedy.
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) The Energy Mix: The Outlook for the Next 30 Years The energy mix is evolving and so is the world in which energy is supplied and consumed. Major progress is being made in developing oil, gas, renewable and other clean energy resources, but the increase in population coupled with the industrialization of developing countries will cause energy demand to more than double by mid-century. The international community is grappling with the trade-offs between development and the environment, and climate change has fundamentally shifted the nature and urgency of the debate. What is a realistic view of the energy mix over the next thirty years and what are the roles for fossil fuels, renewables and nuclear? The program hosts a panel discussion of the outlook for the global energy mix over the next 30 years. Guests include: Amy Myers Jaffe, executive director of energy and sustainability at the Graduate School of Management and the Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis; Daniel Kammen, director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory, UC Berkeley; and Matt Rogers, director of McKinsey & Company's San Francisco office.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum David Kirp's Strategy for Public Schools In rebuilding our public schools, education policy expert David Kirp says we should stick to what works, like quality early-childhood education and creating word-rich curriculums. In other words, avoid getting carried away by quick fixes and the latest trends. His new book, "Improbable Scholars," tells the success story of Union City, New Jersey, and argues that all our public schools can benefit from what was learned there.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Can Entrepreneurs Make a Difference in Detroit? A group of young entrepreneurs is revitalizing parts of Detroit -- starting up businesses in what were once empty warehouses. They're creating buzz and enthusiasm, but in a city where the population is declining and the tax base is crumbling, can they really make a difference?
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Vietnam's Demand for Rhino Horn Drives Poaching The use of rhino horn as Chinese traditional medicine is the main driver of the global trade and slaughter. Much of the demand appears to be coming from Vietnam, where a small group of elites use rhino horn for everything from a hangover remedy to a potential cure for cancer. Never mind that rhino horn -- like fingernails -- is agglutinated hair and has no medicinal value. In China, by contrast, rhino horn is increasingly used for carvings and is even becoming an asset class, with Chinese buying rhino horn as an investment -- betting on continued slaughter and even extinction. The program speaks with rhino horn users and traditional medicine practitioners on the beliefs that are driving the slaughter.
Monday, May 13, 2013

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