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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, May 11, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 11, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Record Levels of Carbon Dioxide Carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere have exceeded 400 parts per million (ppm) for the first time in human history. Human activities are responsible for adding about 120 ppm of that gas to the air, mostly by burning fossil fuels. And carbon dioxide is a major cause of climate change. The program explains how the 400 ppm Rubicon is a reminder of just how rapidly our atmosphere is changing.
  • 1:00 am
    This Week in Northern California Oakland Police Chief Resignation The sudden announcement by Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan that he would step down immediately for medical reasons took everyone by surprise. A veteran of the Oakland Police Department, Jordan has led the force for a turbulent 19 months, taking the reins after Chief Anthony Batts resigned. This latest shake-up leaves city leaders, the police force, and the community all battling the city's rising crime rate, in a state of shock. Assistant Chief Anthony Toribio has been appointed interim chief while a national search begins for Jordan's replacement.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week Benghazi Hearings, Syrian Diplomacy, Immigration and the Changing Electorate During House Oversight Committee hearings this week, three State Department officials disputed the Obama administration's account of what happened during the attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya last September in which U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three Americans were killed. Charles Babington joins the program to talk about the dramatic testimony by the three who are being hailed as whistleblowers by Republicans. Meanwhile Democrats charge the event and deaths are being politicized. Also, Secretary of State John Kerry was involved in a delicate, diplomatic dance with Russia this week as the two nations held talks to address the civil war in Syria. And Jeanne Cummings analyzes a U.S. Census report on the increasingly diverse American electorate and the significance of African Americans making history in 2012 voting at a higher rate than white Americans.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club Pipeline Paradigm In a world still largely dependent on fossil fuels, calls for a transition from the fossil fuel economy have been met with considerable resistance. The Keystone XL pipeline and the Canadian tar sands have become symbols of the dissension over America's energy future. What would the pipelines mean for both the American and Canadian economies? If the tar sands are further developed what will be the climate impacts? The program hosts a conversation on matching energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. Guests include: Sam Avery, author of "The Pipeline and the Paradigm;" Greg Croft, lecturer at St. Mary's College of California; Cassie Doyle, consul general of Canada in San Francisco; and Dan Miller, managing director of Roda Group.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe Opposition in Russia Russian president Vladimir Putin has dismissed his influential deputy prime minister Vladislav Surkov. It's a significant development, as Surkov is credited with designing a political system that has enabled Putin to dominate Russia for over a decade. Observers say his departure is a sign of growing infighting among Kremlin elites, as the economy slows down and civil society is wrestling with an unprecedented crackdown. But can the opposition capitalize on these tensions?
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) The Mirage of the Arab Spring The Arab Spring brought unprecedented changes across the Middle East and North Africa -- but the initial promise now seems to be fading. The political situation in Egypt remains uncertain, Syria continues to spiral out of control and Islamist rebels with ties to al-Qaida have wreaked havoc in North Africa. What future impact will we see from the Arab Spring in these regions? The program's guest is Seth Jones, associate director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at the RAND Corporation.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The Best of Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life Hit the Road It's spring, so we're opening windows and going places. The program shares stories of people who -- for reasons that they can't always explain -- feel compelled to get out and go somewhere, such as one man who decides to take a trip from Philadelphia to San Francisco by foot.
  • 1:30 pm
    Radio Specials Radiolab The Line Between Language and Music -- The program examines the line between language and music. What is music? Why does it move us? The show also re-imagines the disastrous debut of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring in 1913 through the lens of modern neurology, and meets a composer who uses computers to capture the musical DNA of dead composers in order to create new work.
  • 2:30 pm
    Moyers & Company How People Power Generates Change With our democracy threatened by plutocrats and the politicians in their pockets more than ever, the antidote to organized money is organized people. It takes time and effort, but across the country, grass roots democracy is growing. Individuals are banding together, organizing toward common goals and demanding change - and often delivering it. The program speaks with three organizers leading the way: longtime social movement organizer Marshall Ganz; Rachel LaForest, executive director of Right to the City; and Madeline Janis, co-founder and national policy director of the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy.
  • 3:30 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Living On Earth Development vs. Tradition The program discusses a dam project in Ethiopia that threatens the river that much of the local population depends upon. Is it energy and development versus traditional lifestyles?
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion The Time Jumpers The program broadcasts live from Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee. Special guests, Music City all-stars The Time Jumpers, fiddle virtuoso Stuart Duncan, and singer Suzy Bogguss perform. Also, the Royal Academy of Radio Actors, Tim Russell, Sue Scott, and Fred Newman, The Guy's All-Star Shoe Band, and the latest News from Lake Wobegon.
  • 8:30 pm
    Selected Shorts What Would You Do? Mary Beth Hurt reads "In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried," by Amy Hempel; Lou Antonio reads "The Night in Question," by Tobias Wolff; and David Sedaris reads "I Know What I'm Doing About All the Attention I've Been Getting," by Frank Gannon.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life Hit the Road It's spring, so we're opening windows and going places. The program shares stories of people who -- for reasons that they can't always explain -- feel compelled to get out and go somewhere, such as one man who decides to take a trip from Philadelphia to San Francisco by foot.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour PTSD, Lost Art and the Berlin Wall The victim of a random stabbing struggles to reestablish his life while suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder; author Nathan Englander describes coming of age at 19 while traveling through Europe to witness the fall of The Berlin Wall; and an artist and documentary filmmaker loses three years of work in an instant and finds it hard to continue.
  • 11:00 pm
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • 12:00 am
Saturday, May 11, 2013

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