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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, May 9, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, May 9, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The Economic Impact of Immigration The Senate Judiciary Committee is beginning work Thursday on a proposal to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. The program speaks with Adam Davidson from NPR's PlanetMoney team about what academic research says about the economic impact of immigration.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Intelligence Squared U.S. Should We Abolish the Minimum Wage? -- The first attempt at establishing a national minimum wage, a part of 1933's sweeping National Industrial Recovery Act, was struck down by the Supreme Court in 1935. But in 1938, under the Fair Labor Standards Act, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law a minimum hourly wage of 25 cents -- $4.07 in today's dollars. Three-quarters of a century later, we are still debating the merits of this cornerstone of the New Deal. Do we need government to ensure a decent paycheck, or would low-wage workers and the economy be better off without its intervention?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition 'Midnight's Children' Salman Rushdie's novel, "Midnight's Children," follows a group of young Indians born at the moment their country gained independence. Filmmaker Deepa Mehta was born just a few years later. The program discusses how she persuaded Rushdie to adapt his novel for the screen -- and to narrate it.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Mark Bittman on Part-Time Veganism Six years ago, Mark Bittman was a full-time omnivore. But then a doctor told him to turn vegan for health reasons, and suddenly Mark found himself facing a world void of meat, dairy, or processed foods. So the New York Times food writer decided to personalize his vegan diet and allow for some cheating. He called it "Vegan Before 6," or "VB6," and says it helped him improve his health and focus on cooking at home. Mark Bittman talks about his new book, and how a full-time meat lover adapted to part-time veganism.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Google's Eric Schmidt on the New Digital Age Google's executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, says that between Facebook and cloud computing, "your digital identity will live forever." Schmidt and his co-author, Jared Cohen, join us in the studio to talk about their book "The New Digital Age," which explores how online connectivity is changing censorship, privacy, and activism in countries like Mexico, China, and North Korea, and elsewhere around the world.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday The Escalating Crisis in Syria After so much blood, few believe any political process can resolve the civil war in Syria. Refugees crowd camps in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon. Iran and Hezbollah line up with Basher Al-Assad, and President Obama considers arms for the rebels. Journalist Ted Koppel joins the program to discuss the escalating crisis in Syria.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Buzz Aldrin and His Mission to Mars Buzz Aldrin says that if the U.S. doesn't build a colony on the Red Planet, someone else will. Aldrin, the second man on the moon, has a plan to put Americans on Mars by 2035 -- and a plan to pay for it. The program speaks with Buzz Aldrin about his mission to Mars.
  • 1:00 pm
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Flower of Empire The program discusses how an Amazonian water lily of mammoth proportions became the iconic flower of Victorian Britain.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Portraying Socioeconomic Class in Cinema The program discusses how films like the upcoming "The Great Gatsby" depict socioeconomic class in a variety of ways. But how realistic are these portrayals?
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Amending the Immigration Reform -- The Senate Judiciary Committee is plowing through dozens of amendments to its immigration reform plan. The program discusses how many of these proposed changes are Republican attempts to have tighter controls on the border with Mexico.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Portraying Socioeconomic Class in Cinema The program discusses how films like the upcoming "The Great Gatsby" depict socioeconomic class in a variety of ways. But how realistic are these portrayals?
  • 7:00 pm
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Hearing Voices All Mom Radio: For Mother's Day -- For Mother's Day, the program shares maternal tales from producers around the country. "Travels with Mom" follows Larry Massett and his mother to the Tybee Island, Georgia of today and of the 1920's. Writer Beverly Donofrio joins her mom for "Thursday Night Bingo," produced by Dave Isay of Sound Portraits. In Nancy Updike's "Mubarak and Margy," a gay man returns home to care for his mom -- and to the "cure" his family plans for his homosexuality. And comedian Amy Borkowsky shares her hilarious phone "Messages from Mom."
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Mark Bittman on Part-Time Veganism Six years ago, Mark Bittman was a full-time omnivore. But then a doctor told him to turn vegan for health reasons, and suddenly Mark found himself facing a world void of meat, dairy, or processed foods. So the New York Times food writer decided to personalize his vegan diet and allow for some cheating. He called it "Vegan Before 6," or "VB6," and says it helped him improve his health and focus on cooking at home. Mark Bittman talks about his new book, and how a full-time meat lover adapted to part-time veganism.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered New Mice Study May Help Explain Differences in Identical Twins A new study of genetically identical mice in the journal Science may help explain why identical twins develop different personalities. Even though they share the same genes and lived in the same cage, the study suggests the mice created different experiences for themselves by deciding how much to explore. Those different experiences were associated with changes in a part of the brain called the hippocampus. The program discusses the study and its implications.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Turkey Tale Trade Turkey tails -- whether fried, bar-b-qued, roasted or broiled -- are a favorite food for many Pacific Islanders, particularly Samoans. However, citizens of the Republic of Samoa haven't been able to enjoy turkey tails for the past six years, thanks to an import ban imposed to promote public health. But in order to get into the World Trade Organization, the Republic of Samoa had to drop the import ban.
Thursday, May 9, 2013

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