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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, May 8, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, May 8, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Fake Missiles in North Korea? North Korea appears to soon be ready to test its most advanced missile yet. Pentagon officials are worried about an even more powerful missile that appeared in a parade last year, called the KN-08. But the missile on display was a fake. The open intelligence community is divided as to whether the KN-08 really exists -- or if it's just an elaborate decoy.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Calvin Trillin and Garrison Keillor Garrison Keillor revitalized radio in 1974 with "A Prairie Home Companion." The weekly broadcasts showcase Keillor's gifts as a writer, storyteller, producer and performer, and are listened to by over 4 million Americans. Humorist and long-time New Yorker staff writer Calvin Trillin is a beloved chronicler of culture. Though his writing about food began as comic relief from his more serious pieces, it has earned him a dedicated readership and has been collected in three books including "American Fried," "Alice Let's Eat" and "Third Helpings." Trillin's other works include "Messages From My Father," "Remembering Denny" and "About Alice." His most recent book is "Dogfight: The 2012 Presidential Campaign in Verse." Both Keillor and Trillin celebrated 32 years of City Arts & Lectures broadcasts from the Herbst Theater, on April 30, 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Ethnicity and Identity Cards in Afghanistan Afghanistan is issuing new I.D. cards containing computer chips that can reveal a citizen's ethnic group. The cards are proving to be controversial, not just because some Afghans think they're divisive -- others want their ethnicity printed right on the card for everyone to see.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Calif. High Court Rules Cities Can Ban Pot Dispensaries In a unanimous decision, the California high court has ruled that local governments have the power to ban medical marijuana dispensaries. The decision upholds bans in about 200 California cities. But in a state with a robust pot economy, lawmakers still debate if and how to regulate the drug. We'll discuss the ruling and what this means for the marijuana market, its dispensaries and its consumers.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Iranian-American Fiction The editors of the first anthology of Iranian-American fiction say there is a maturing literary voice emerging from the Iranian-American community. Many Iranian immigrants came to the U.S. after the Shah was overthrown in 1979, and roughly half of them live in California. We talk with Bay Area editors and authors of "Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian-American Writers" about their stories, culture and community.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Political Junkie Ken Rudin Actual votes in South Carolina, poll surprises in Massachusetts, the Heritage Foundation's estimated cost of immigration reform draws fire from both sides of the aisle, and everyone wants to know about Chris Christie's lap band. Political Junkie Ken Rudin joins the program to discuss the latest news in politics.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Randy Newman: The King of TV Theme Songs Randy Newman never considered himself a rock star. He's had hits, such as "I Love LA," but is better known as "The king of TV theme songs and film scores." He says he was surprised when he found out he'd be inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Randy Newman joins host Neal Conan.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air How Wall Street Defanged Dodd Frank Gary Rivlin speaks with host Terry Gross about how the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act -- which was signed into law three years ago -- has subsequently been attacked and weakened by financial industry lobbyists and lawyers. It's the subject of Rivlin's latest article in The Nation.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Poet and Musician Anthony Joseph Anthony Joseph outgrew his island of Trinidad and moved to cosmopolitan London as soon as he could, to be a poet and a musician. But he says he can't leave the island behind. The program speaks with Anthony Joseph, and gets a global focus to the news.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Telltale Signs of Corporate Culture The program examines the telltale signs of corporate culture -- such as unusual conference room names -- and all the day's business headlines.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Bill Gates and His Efforts in Eradicating Polio -- The program speaks with Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates about his foundation's efforts in eradicating polio around the world. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged $1.8 billion toward a $5.5 billion dollar effort they believe will bring the number of cases of polio to zero.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Telltale Signs of Corporate Culture The program examines the telltale signs of corporate culture -- such as unusual conference room names -- and all the day's business headlines.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air How Wall Street Defanged Dodd Frank Gary Rivlin speaks with host Terry Gross about how the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act -- which was signed into law three years ago -- has subsequently been attacked and weakened by financial industry lobbyists and lawyers. It's the subject of Rivlin's latest article in The Nation.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Intelligence Squared U.S. Should We Abolish the Minimum Wage? -- The first attempt at establishing a national minimum wage, a part of 1933's sweeping National Industrial Recovery Act, was struck down by the Supreme Court in 1935. But in 1938, under the Fair Labor Standards Act, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law a minimum hourly wage of 25 cents -- $4.07 in today's dollars. Three-quarters of a century later, we are still debating the merits of this cornerstone of the New Deal. Do we need government to ensure a decent paycheck, or would low-wage workers and the economy be better off without its intervention?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Iranian-American Fiction The editors of the first anthology of Iranian-American fiction say there is a maturing literary voice emerging from the Iranian-American community. Many Iranian immigrants came to the U.S. after the Shah was overthrown in 1979, and roughly half of them live in California. We talk with Bay Area editors and authors of "Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian-American Writers" about their stories, culture and community.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Large Variation in Medicare Fees Data released for the first time by the government on Wednesday shows that hospitals charge Medicare wildly differing amounts. Government officials said that some of the variation might reflect the fact that some patients were sicker or required longer hospitalization. However, as the program discusses, these charges are not paid by the government or by insurers, who set rates and pay according to them regardless of charges set by hospitals.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The Economic Impact of Immigration The Senate Judiciary Committee is beginning work Thursday on a proposal to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. The program speaks with Adam Davidson from NPR's PlanetMoney team about what academic research says about the economic impact of immigration.
Wednesday, May 8, 2013

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