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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, April 10, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered A Spotlight on Syria Rezan Chalabi Sham imagined her future as an English professor in Homs, Syria. The 26-year-old comes from one of the wealthiest families in Syria, but the revolution has dramatically changed her life. She has spoken to the National Security Council in Washington, and helps advise the U.S. State Department on worthy projects in Syria. The program shows how, in a revolt that often pits urban Syria against a rural mentality, an individual like Chalabi Sham can talk to both sides.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg Sheryl Sandberg is chief operating officer at Facebook. She oversees the firm's business operations including sales, marketing, business development, legal, human resources, public policy and communications. Prior to Facebook, Sandberg was vice president of global online sales and operations at Google, where she built and managed online sales for advertising and publishing and operations for consumer products worldwide. She was also instrumental in launching Google.org, Google's philanthropic arm. Sheryl previously served as chief of staff for the U.S. Treasury Department under President Bill Clinton and began her career as an economist with the World Bank. She serves on the boards of Facebook, The Walt Disney Company, Women for Women International, V-Day, ONE and chairs the board of Lean In. Her new book is "Lean In: Woman, Work, and the Will to Lead." She appeared in conversation with Condoleezza Rice, former U.S. secretary of state and faculty member at Stanford University, on April 1, 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Living with a President's Ghost in Venezuela Venezuelans are getting ready to elect a successor to Hugo Chavez -- but the late president's face and voice are everywhere. The program speaks with a Chavez biographer in Venezuela about living with a president's ghost.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Gun Control Showdown On Monday, President Obama stood alongside family members of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victims and called for Congress to vote on gun control legislation. While some senators are working on a bipartisan compromise, more than a dozen Republicans have threatened to filibuster a vote on any such bill. We talk about the policies being proposed, and the likely fate of gun control legislation in this Capitol Hill showdown.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Lost Cat Ever wondered what your cat does when you're not around? Author Caroline Paul was gripped by the question after her anxious and timid cat Tibby disappeared for several weeks, only to return fat, happy and confident. So Paul and her partner, illustrator Wendy MacNaughton, took the logical next step: they strapped a GPS and camera on Tibby to sniff out his secret second life. Paul and MacNaughton join Forum to discuss their intrepid investigation, the elusive lives of cats and their book, "Lost Cat: A True Story of Love, Desperation and GPS Technology."
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Political Roundup with Ken Rudin President Obama continues to push the U.S. Senate on guns, immigration waits another week, and budgets bloom in Washington as Congress returns. Political Junkie Ken Rudin joins the program to review the week in politics
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The New U.S. Military Intelligence Complex Host Terry Gross speaks with Mark Mazzetti, Pulitzer Prize-winning national security correspondent for the New York Times. His new book, "The Way of the Knife," describes the evolution of the new military intelligence complex. Mazzetti claims military intelligence has evolved, to the point where the CIA now does targeted killings and the U.S. military's special operations forces conduct spying missions.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Learning to Speak Irish The Irish language has a rich history. But in Belfast, Northern Ireland, it's hardly spoken at all. There the language has historically been associated with being Catholic -- until now. The program discusses how Protestants in Belfast are now learning to speak Irish.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Costs of E-Verify While the U.S. Congress debates an immigration bill that would require American businesses to use E-Verify to check the immigration status of new employees, companies are increasingly concerned about the cost of using the system.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Venezuela Opposition Candidate Henrique Capriles -- Venezuela opposition candidate Henrique Capriles faces an uphill battle in his effort to win Sunday's presidential election. Opinion polls put him well behind the interim president, Nicolas Maduro, who is running on a campaign as late President Hugo Chavez' successor. Capriles tells the program how the nation has lost its way and that he wants to tackle soaring crime and encourage free-market policies.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Costs of E-Verify While the U.S. Congress debates an immigration bill that would require American businesses to use E-Verify to check the immigration status of new employees, companies are increasingly concerned about the cost of using the system.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The New U.S. Military Intelligence Complex Host Terry Gross speaks with Mark Mazzetti, Pulitzer Prize-winning national security correspondent for the New York Times. His new book, "The Way of the Knife," describes the evolution of the new military intelligence complex. Mazzetti claims military intelligence has evolved, to the point where the CIA now does targeted killings and the U.S. military's special operations forces conduct spying missions.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Climate One -- Solar Flares Through all the growing pains and political attacks, the U.S. solar industry is still moving ahead. The founders of three prominent Bay Area startup companies that lease systems to homeowners share their insight on tapping the sun to get off fossil fuels, creating investment opportunities for small investors, and whether natural gas is a good bridge to cleaner power -- or dirty and unnecessary. They also talk about how monopoly utilities are grappling with their customers suddenly becoming competitors. Guests include: Ed Fenster, co-founder of Sunrun; Danny Kennedy, president and founder of Sungevity; Marco Krapels, executive vice president of Rabobank; and Lyndon Rive, co-founder and CEO of SolarCity.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Lost Cat Ever wondered what your cat does when you're not around? Author Caroline Paul was gripped by the question after her anxious and timid cat Tibby disappeared for several weeks, only to return fat, happy and confident. So Paul and her partner, illustrator Wendy MacNaughton, took the logical next step: they strapped a GPS and camera on Tibby to sniff out his secret second life. Paul and MacNaughton join Forum to discuss their intrepid investigation, the elusive lives of cats and their book, "Lost Cat: A True Story of Love, Desperation and GPS Technology."
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Reforming California's Three Strikes Law Last November, California voters reformed their three strikes sentencing law, the toughest in the nation. No longer will people receive life sentences for third strikes that are non-violent, non-serious crimes -- and those that did receive such sentences for lesser crimes can now go to court to have their sentences reduced and be released from prison. The program speaks with Shane Reams, now free after serving 17 years on a drug charge, and his mother, Sue Reams, who campaigned during those same 17 years to have the old three strikes law changed.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered First Lady Joins Efforts to Fight Violence in Chicago First lady Michelle Obama will follow in the footsteps of her husband when she returns to her hometown of Chicago to talk about ways to combat youth violence. The president did so after a 15-year-old who had performed in inauguration festivities was killed near his Chicago home earlier this year. Mrs. Obama attended the teenager's funeral, and now she will join city officials to throw her support behind an effort to raise $50 million for community-based programs considered successful in serving at-risk youth.
Wednesday, April 10, 2013

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