Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, April 4, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, April 4, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Next Steps for Bankrupt Stockton NPR's Richard Gonzales reports on the next steps in the bankruptcy of Stockton, California. A judge has cleared the way for the city to file for Chapter 9 protection. And that sets up a fight between bondholders and the state pension system. Who is first in line to get paid?
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials World Affairs 2013: World Affairs Conference Transition: Women Changing the World -- As part of the World Affairs Council's ongoing focus on transitions, disruptions and innovations that are sure to challenge and inspire, the program hears from Fouzia Saeed, director of Mehergarh and fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy. Saeed is one of the most respected advocates for women's rights in Pakistan. For decades, she has worked on women's issues, especially those linked to violence against women, prostitution, women's mobility and sexual harassment.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition 'Kinky Boots,' the Musical The British movie "Kinky Boots" was an indie hit about a little shoe factory that finds success making footwear for drag queens. Now it's coming to Broadway, with songs by Cyndi Lauper and a script by Harvey Fierstein.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum North Korea's Missile Threats In response to nuclear threats from North Korea, the U.S. government announced Wednesday that it was deploying an advanced missile defense system to Guam. We'll discuss the latest developments.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Douglas Rushkoff on 'Present Shock' Author and trend-spotter Douglas Rushkoff says humans are living in the present more than ever before. But he isn't talking about a serene Zen-like state of being in the moment. Instead, thanks to mobile devices and other technology, "presentism" is characterized by a constant state of distraction, and a need for immediacy which affects virtually everything: the way we tell stories, invest money, and even evaluate politicians. Rushkoff joins us to talk about his new book, "Present Shock."
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday What's Next at Gitmo? A hunger strike has been growing at Guantanamo Bay. Prisoners object to the way their cells are searched and how their Qurans are handled -- but also to open-ended imprisonment with, for most, no charges, no trial and no prospect of release for men sometimes described as some of the most dangerous terrorists in the world.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Big Ideas to Battle Traffic The city of Los Angeles is notorious for gridlock. Los Angeles expanded its public transportation system, improved its highways and created incentives to car pool. But still the congestion gets worse. Now, there's a technological response. L.A. has synchronized every single traffic light in the city.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Former Mormon Missionary Looks Back Ryan McIlvain joins Terry Gross to talk about his life as a Mormon missionary, going door to door proselytizing despite having doubts about his faith. McIlvain is the author of the new novel "Elders," which is based on his two years as a Mormon missionary in Brazil. He is from a 6th generation Mormon family, but left the church in his mid-20s.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Protecting Magic Tricks in the Digital Age American magician Jeff McBride creates his own illusions. He spent decades crafting them. Imagine his surprise, then, at seeing his best routines on YouTube, performed by somebody in Thailand.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Big Data, Big Storage Bills Big data is the slogan of modern-day marketing. But as companies collect more and more information on their customers, the cost of storing this data is soaring to the tune of $70 billion a year.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Fast Food Strike -- Hundreds of fast food workers in New York City walked off the job Thursday in what organizers are calling the biggest job action in the industry's history. Fast food is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the economy, but workers complain that the jobs don't pay enough to survive in New York City.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Big Data, Big Storage Bills Big data is the slogan of modern-day marketing. But as companies collect more and more information on their customers, the cost of storing this data is soaring to the tune of $70 billion a year.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Former Mormon Missionary Looks Back Ryan McIlvain joins Terry Gross to talk about his life as a Mormon missionary, going door to door proselytizing despite having doubts about his faith. McIlvain is the author of the new novel "Elders," which is based on his two years as a Mormon missionary in Brazil. He is from a 6th generation Mormon family, but left the church in his mid-20s.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials World Affairs 2013: World Affairs Conference Future Global Challenges for the U.S. -- As part of the World Affairs Council's ongoing focus on transitions, disruptions and innovations that are sure to challenge and inspire, the program hears from Fareed Zakaria, host of "Fareed Zakaria GPS" on CNN, editor-at-large for TIME and columnist for The Washington Post. With election-year politics behind us, the president and the new U.S. administration can no longer afford to wait to tackle a long list of challenges, both at home and abroad. Perhaps more than at any time in recent memory, the world seems unstable or at least unpredictable; an era where political and economic transitions have unintended consequences and unforeseen events cause major disruptions in global politics and the world economy. Zakaria will put these issues in perspective and consider the best future course for the United States.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Douglas Rushkoff on 'Present Shock' Author and trend-spotter Douglas Rushkoff says humans are living in the present more than ever before. But he isn't talking about a serene Zen-like state of being in the moment. Instead, thanks to mobile devices and other technology, "presentism" is characterized by a constant state of distraction, and a need for immediacy which affects virtually everything: the way we tell stories, invest money, and even evaluate politicians. Rushkoff joins us to talk about his new book, "Present Shock."
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Proposed Gun Control in Oregon The program discusses the issue of gun control in Oregon, as the Oregon state Senate will hear testimony related to proposed bills on Friday. One bill would mandate a universal criminal background check for all gun purchasers, and another would ban guns on school grounds. One measure requires more training to get gun permits, and the final bill would prevent gun permit holders from openly carrying their weapons in government buildings -- something currently legal in Oregon.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Decoding Our Dreams What if we could record our dreams and play them back later, allowing us to dissect the most mysterious meanderings of our psyches? The program discusses how Japanese scientists have taken a first tentative step to do just that. They're started to figure out how to watch what we dream by analyzing our brain activity using high-tech brain scanners and computerized decoding of brain waves.
Thursday, April 4, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.