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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, March 18, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, March 18, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Tech Nation Primordial Geology Host Moira Gunn talks with University of Washington professor David Montgomery on the beginnings of geology, and the centuries-old search for evidence of Noah's flood.
  • 1:00 am
    Cambridge Forum Ending Slavery - Part I International human rights worker and award-winning author Kevin Bales presents a 25-year plan to end global slavery and rebuild the lives of 27 million held in slavery today. What does slavery in the modern world look like? What actions by governments, NGOs, businesses and individuals are required to bring an end to more than 5,000 years of human bondage?
  • 1:30 am
    Latino USA The 'A' Word - News or Noise? When did "amnesty" become such a dirty word? For the program's first "News or Noise" segment -- taking a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation - host Maria Hinojosa talks to attorney Allan Wernick about the use of the word "amnesty" when it comes to immigration policy.
  • 2:00 am
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Morning Edition Women Combat Veterans The Pentagon is officially opening combat positions to women. But American women have served in combat for centuries. They've also been injured and killed. The program begins a series on women veterans of combat.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum The Iraq Invasion, 10 Years Later Tuesday marks the 10th anniversary of the United States' invasion of Iraq. Former president George W. Bush justified the 2003 invasion on the grounds that then-Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction. That assertion proved to be incorrect, as did the administration's initial prediction of a brief conflict. The third-longest war in U.S. history has claimed the lives of at least 190,000 people -- including 4,488 U.S. service members and 134,000 Iraqi civilians -- and has cost more than $2 trillion, according to a new Brown University study. We look back at the Iraq invasion and discuss the legacy of the war.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum China's Terracotta Warriors Come to SF When the Chinese Emperor Qin Shihuang died in 210 BC, he took his royal court and over 7,000 of his soldiers with him to the grave. But they were all made of clay. Dubbed the "ghost army," over 7,000 terracotta warriors were built by craftsmen and lined up underground alongside clay horses and weapons. A portion of those soldiers are now on display at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. We talk to experts about the exhibit.
  • 11:00 am
    NPR News A Decade On, Evaluating the Iraq War Ten years ago, a U.S.-led invasion brushed aside Iraq's army and toppled the country's long-time leader, Saddam Hussein. The swift military operation quickly became a difficult and complicated occupation. The U.S. found itself fighting an insurgency, and a sectarian conflict nearly consumed the country. After years of bloody conflict, multiple tactical and strategic changes in course and the election of a new Iraqi parliament, U.S. forces left the country in 2012. Thousands of Americans died, tens of thousands were injured, and many more Iraqis perished. A decade later, what was accomplished? Guests joining host Neal Conan include John Nagle, former key aide to General Petraeus; military historian Thomas Ricks and NPR Commentator Ted Koppel.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air For Many Veterans, a Crippling Wait for Benefits Soldiers who come home from Iraq and Afghanistan can wait up to 10 months to receive disability and other benefits from the VA. Some veterans can wait a year or more. Terry Gross talks with Aaron Glantz of the Center for Investigative Reporting, who says backlog and bureaucratic dysfunction are costing lives and hurting vets from the Vietnam War on. Glantz also covered the Iraq War and is the author of "The War Comes Home: Washington's Battle Against America's Veterans."
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Whither Skid Row? As downtown Los Angeles becomes more lucrative for real estate developers, what's to be done about the city's controversial homeless community known as Skid Row? As the show reports, that question has been the subject of fevered debate.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Cyprus Rattles Europe -- Cyprus is facing a run on its banks after the government proposed taxing bank deposits. The government has put off a vote on the plan in a bid to calm things down. Banks are set to re-open on Thursday after a bank holiday was declared on Monday.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Whither Skid Row? As downtown Los Angeles becomes more lucrative for real estate developers, what's to be done about the city's controversial homeless community known as Skid Row? As the show reports, that question has been the subject of fevered debate.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air For Many Veterans, a Crippling Wait for Benefits Soldiers who come home from Iraq and Afghanistan can wait up to 10 months to receive disability and other benefits from the VA. Some veterans can wait a year or more. Terry Gross talks with Aaron Glantz of the Center for Investigative Reporting, who says backlog and bureaucratic dysfunction are costing lives and hurting vets from the Vietnam War on. Glantz also covered the Iraq War and is the author of "The War Comes Home: Washington's Battle Against America's Veterans."
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Climate Change: More Than an Environmental Challenge The program's guest is Andrew Guzman, professor of law and associate dean for international and executive education at UC Berkeley. With the 10 warmest years since 1880 all having occurred since 1998, it's clear that climate change is very real. A warming planet doesn't just mean melting ice caps, rising waters and other environmental problems, according to Professor Guzman. It also means the potential for never-before-seen migration, famine, war and disease. This is not a phenomenon that we have to wait for as it is already happening. Prolonged droughts, massive flooding and food shortages have already become the norm in certain parts of the developing world.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum China's Terracotta Warriors Come to SF When the Chinese Emperor Qin Shihuang died in 210 BC, he took his royal court and over 7,000 of his soldiers with him to the grave. But they were all made of clay. Dubbed the "ghost army," over 7,000 terracotta warriors were built by craftsmen and lined up underground alongside clay horses and weapons. A portion of those soldiers are now on display at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. We talk to experts about the exhibit.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Smart Guns What if a gun could only be fired by its rightful owner? What if it recognized a grip or fingerprint or communicated with a special ring? It's been a fantasy for years, and in the wake of the Sandy Hook tragedy, so-called smart gun technology is back in the spotlight.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The mass killings in Newtown, Conn., and Aurora, Colo. got a great deal of media coverage -- but, statistically, they are not the norm. Thousands of gun homicides occur in the U.S. in more mundane ways and garner little or no media attention. They're usually shootings in which a single person dies, and the victim is most often a minority male under 25 who is shot in an urban area. One such victim was Charles Foster Jr., a 24-year-old college student who died in the early hours of Jan. 1 this year. He was celebrating New Year's Eve in a dance club in Columbus, Ga., when shooting erupted and a stray bullet hit him in the chest. The show talks with people who knew Foster, the people who were with him that night and those who dealt with the aftermath of the shooting.
Monday, March 18, 2013

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