Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, March 15, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, March 15, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered CPAC and Immigration Amid GOP soul-searching over a dismal 2012 election, a consensus has emerged that Republicans must appeal better to Latino voters. The effort has even appeared at the Conservative Political Action Conference, with a panel on immigration reform on Thursday morning.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials The Raw and the Cooked Academy Award-winning actress Frances McDormand hosts an hour of stories produced by The Kitchen Sisters. Included are tales of kitchens that suddenly pop up, kitchens that stay underground to survive and kitchens that are the keepers of a culture. The show travels the country in search of hidden kitchens and little-known corners of American food culture, from the Sheepherder's Ball in the Basque Country in Boise to the breadbasket of California's Central Valley.
  • 3:30 am
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
    Morning Edition Your Right to 5 Minutes of a Lawyer's Time In American courts, defendants are provided with a lawyer, even if they can't afford one. But some of those lawyers are so overworked, clients get just minutes of their time. On the 50th anniversary of the right to be defended by a lawyer - does the system need reform?
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we're listening to Kafka, watching films shot on smartphones and remembering Brubeck.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum San Francisco Symphony on Strike On Wednesday, the 100-plus musicians of the San Francisco Symphony officially went on strike, just days before they were set to perform at Carnegie Hall and kick off an East Coast tour. The musicians say they want salaries comparable to the Chicago and Los Angeles symphonies, and they question the bonuses and spending of symphony management. Symphony officials say musicians are already well compensated, with average salaries exceeding $165,000. We hear from both sides on the discord.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum A Later Last-Call for California Bars? California cities and towns could allow bars and restaurants to serve liquor until 4:00 a.m. under a proposal by State Senator Mark Leno. Currently, the state permits booze service from 6:00 a.m. until 2:00 a.m. The San Francisco Democrat says the extended hours would boost employment and promote tourism. But critics contend that the change could lead to more crime and encourage drinking and driving.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum What Grandmothers Do As fond as we may be of our grandmothers, evolutionary biologists have long questioned why women live for so long after they can procreate. The so-called "grandmother hypothesis" posits that grandmothers help the species survive by taking care of grandchildren and helping support families. In the U.S., grandparents are the primary source of child care for a third of families with a working mother and young children. We discuss the role of grandmothers in the U.S. and globally. What role did your grandmother play in your life? If you're a grandmother, does your family rely on your labor? How do you feel about it?
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Learning From Cyber-Chondriacs Are you a cyber-chondriac? Host Ira Flatow and guests look at finding health information on the web. What are doctors learning from your search efforts? Plus, how even a single concussion may cause brain damage.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday A Book for Budding Crime-Solvers The brains behind the TV show "Bones" is back. Ira Flatow talks with forensic scientist Kathy Reichs about her new book "Code," written for budding crime-solvers.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson Terry Gross talks with screenwriter and film director Paul Thomas Anderson. His film "The Master" is out now on DVD, and stars Philip Seymour Hoffman as a leader of a cult and Joaquin Phoenix as one of his followers. Anderson's other films include "There Will Be Blood," "Magnolia" and "Boogie Nights," all of which have been nominated for an Oscar for best original screenplay.
  • 2:00 pm
    World A How-To Book on Kosher Coupling An Orthodox rabbi and sex therapist in Jerusalem has written a sex manual for ultra-Orthodox Jews. He says Orthodox couples need more preparation for marriage, as young people in the community have little or no contact with the opposite sex.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Weathering the 'American Winter' In the wake of the Great Recession, once middle-class American families now struggle to make ends meet. Host Kai Ryssdal talks to filmmakers Joe and Harry Gantz about their new HBO documentary "American Winter," which explores how families have suffered in the weakened economy.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Does Immigration Make Cities Safer? -- Is there a link between immigration and higher crime rates? Politicians from Pennsylvania to Arizona claim there is, and many have passed tough anti-immigration laws as a result. But social scientists say first-generation immigrants actually make their communities safer. They point to big, high-immigration cities in New York, Texas and California, which have some of the lowest crime rates in the country.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report Decades After Escaping Nazis, 'Kinder' Refugees Reunite This year marks the 75th anniversary of the start of the Kindertransport, a program which shuttled Jewish children out of Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland before the Nazis decimated the Jewish population. Many of those "kinder" -- now mostly in their 80s -- eventually ended up in California. We caught up with a few of them at a recent reunion in Irvine.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson Terry Gross talks with screenwriter and film director Paul Thomas Anderson. His film "The Master" is out now on DVD, and stars Philip Seymour Hoffman as a leader of a cult and Joaquin Phoenix as one of his followers. Anderson's other films include "There Will Be Blood," "Magnolia" and "Boogie Nights," all of which have been nominated for an Oscar for best original screenplay.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Twitter Chief Dick Costolo From allowing people to opt-out of invasive Internet tracking on Twitter and refusing to shut the site down during the SOPA conundrum, to his former days as a Chicago stand-up comedian and his passion for improv, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo is known for bold and sometimes surprising decision making. In his day-to-day as Twitter's chief, Costolo has the challenging post of managing a revolutionary global company.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report Decades After Escaping Nazis, 'Kinder' Refugees Reunite This year marks the 75th anniversary of the start of the Kindertransport, a program which shuttled Jewish children out of Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland before the Nazis decimated the Jewish population. Many of those "kinder" -- now mostly in their 80s -- eventually ended up in California. We caught up with a few of them at a recent reunion in Irvine.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered In China, Council Seats for Sale It's political season in China, but a recent scandal has exposed the murkier side of Chinese politics. One man has gone public after trying to bribe local officials to win a seat on a provincial council. He was not elected because his bribes were apparently too small. Police chief or party secretary positions are said to be up for sale - and China's new leadership has vowed to crack down on corruption, publicly admitting their very survival is at stake.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Anonymous Hacker Indicted A deputy editor for social media at Reuters has been indicted by the Justice Department for helping the hacker group Anonymous gain illegal access to the Tribune Company's servers. During the period in question, Matthew Keys had just been fired from a Tribune-owned TV station.
Friday, March 15, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.