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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, March 11, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, March 11, 2013
  • 12:00 am
  • 1:00 am
    Cambridge Forum America in the King Years, 1965-1968 Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch completes his biography of Martin Luther King, chronicling the expansion of the Civil Rights Movement into protests of the war in Vietnam and calls for broader social and economic justice for all Americans. How ready was America in 1965 to hear Dr. King's message? Are we closer to achieving his dream today, four decades after his assassination?
  • 1:30 am
    Latino USA Mining and the Women of Guatemala Host Maria Hinojosa travels to Guatemala for a report on the many indigenous women there who are involved in clashes with multinational mining companies that they say are despoiling the environment and threatening their way of life.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money The Dow's Best Week Ever Nearly all of us have skin in the game - our retirement funds, our kids' college funds, etc. Should we be re-thinking our investment strategies with the Dow at a new record high? Guest host David Lazarus talks with Ken Winans, a portfolio manager and the founder of Winans International Investment Management in San Francisco.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Facebook Exec on Women and Work Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg's book about women and work has started a lot of arguments -- and it's not even out yet. She says she wants women to embrace success in the workplace. Sandberg joins the show to talk about her new book, "Lean In."
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum International News Roundup Tensions in North Korea over new United Nations sanctions, elections in Kenya with candidates accused of war crimes, and ongoing efforts to free peacekeepers seized by Syrian rebels are just some of the latest stories from around the world. We discuss the top international headlines with a panel of experts.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum First Person: Aileen Hernandez For more than six decades, San Franciscan Aileen Hernandez has been working to make American society more equal. A native New Yorker born of Jamaican parents, she moved to California to work for the International Ladies Garment Workers Union. She went on to become the only woman appointed by President Johnson to the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and, soon after, helped found the National Organization for Women (NOW). She became NOW's second president, where she worked for more inclusion of women of color in the women's rights movement.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Two Years Later, Rebuilding the Japanese Coast Two years ago, a massive tsunami barreled over sea walls in Japan, killing nearly 19,000 and wiping out entire communities. Even now, tens of thousands of people are still living in temporary housing, wondering when they'll ever have a home again.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Biotech's Brave New Beasts Scientists are now creating pigs that can grow organs for human transplant, goats that produce valuable protein-rich milk and mice that are used to trace genetic deformities. Terry Gross talks with Emily Anthes about her new book, "Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech'ss Brave New Beasts."
  • 2:00 pm
    World Outsiders Find Common Ground on the Soccer Field Young refugees from Burma, Iraq, Thailand, Afghanistan and Congo are learning to play soccer together in Phoenix, Arizona. If they feel like outsiders, they're not alone. Their coaches are undocumented immigrants from Mexico.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace After Fukushima, Food Worries Persist Two years after the Japanese tsunami and nuclear disaster, no one is quite sure how safe it is to eat food that could have been exposed to radiation. As a result, some people are paying to have their food tested, or they're avoiding staples like fish altogether.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace After Fukushima, Food Worries Persist Two years after the Japanese tsunami and nuclear disaster, no one is quite sure how safe it is to eat food that could have been exposed to radiation. As a result, some people are paying to have their food tested, or they're avoiding staples like fish altogether.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Biotech's Brave New Beasts Scientists are now creating pigs that can grow organs for human transplant, goats that produce valuable protein-rich milk and mice that are used to trace genetic deformities. Terry Gross talks with Emily Anthes about her new book, "Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech'ss Brave New Beasts."
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Russ Feingold on the Future of American Security In an era of increased security threats, the U.S. faces difficult and complex challenges. Senator Russ Feingold, who became well-versed in these challenges during his time on the foreign relations and intelligence committees, believes that due to institutional failures the U.S. has not responded properly. Feingold argues that a variety of factors contributed to this failure, from the oversimplification of complex problems to the way the war on terror has been portrayed in public; from our understanding of the nature of Islam to views of American exceptionalism. What steps must be taken to address the threats America faces?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Mummies Had Heart Disease, Too Researchers have found hardened arteries after scanning mummified bodies, some of which were more than 3,000 years old. A more modern diet and lifestyle were once thought to be the causes of heart disease, but a new study recently published in the journal The Lancet may prove otherwise. Audie Cornish talks to cardiologist Randall Thompson, one of the study's authors, about the findings.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The Global War on Terror Lives On When President Obama took office, he abandoned the language of the "global war on terror." But far from abandoning the legal theories behind it, he has entrenched and in some cases expanded those authorities. The fight over drones and targeted killing of Americans is just the latest example.
Monday, March 11, 2013

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