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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, March 4, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, March 4, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Tech Nation Po Bronson Host Moira Gunn speaks with Po Bronson about his new book "Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing." Then on BioIssue of the Week, David Ewing Duncan sees new bioethical challenges for professional sports.
  • 1:00 am
    Cambridge Forum Is America Possible? A Journey of Hope Theologian and a personal friend of Martin Luther King, Jr., Vincent Harding argues that, especially for African-Americans, the American Dream has never been realized. At best a hope, at worst a mockery, it remains alive in the words and imaginations of artists and activists. Retracing the roads and revisiting his companions of the Civil Rights Movement, Harding calls on young people to claim the vision of American ideals.
  • 1:30 am
    Latino USA Latinos and Gun Control How do Latinos feel about restrictions on gun control? Is now the time to restrict the right to bear arms? The show hears two interesting perspectives on the relationship between Latinos and guns. And did you know that Latino farmers and ranchers sued the U.S. Department of Agriculture and won? The USDA was not giving grants to Latino and African-American farmers fairly. And now that the lawsuit is over, many ranchers are not signing up for compensation.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Debunking the Sequester Hype Our political leaders couldn't cut a budget deal, so now Americans will have to wait and see how and if they'll be personally impacted by the spending cuts. For analysis, guest host David Lazarus talks with economist and author Dr. Julianne Malveaux.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Positive Encouragement Key to Kids' Healthy Eating Parents often threaten kids to eat better. No vegetables means no dessert. But researchers say a positive approach is more effective, like letting kids pick new foods to try. The show finds out why the carrot is better than the stick, at getting kids to eat their carrots.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Washington Roundup: This Week in Politics The deadline to come up with a deal to avoid sequestration has come and gone. President Obama made some dire predictions about the March 1 deadline, so what political and economic fallout are we actually dealing with? Now that Chuck Hagel's rocky confirmation as defense secretary is over, will John Brennan, Obama's pick for CIA director, get the same treatment? We'll take a look at the big political stories of the week with a team of Washington experts.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Lawrence Wright on His New Play and Scientology We talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning author, journalist and playwright Lawrence Wright. His new play on the life of Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci premieres at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre this week. Fallaci, who died in 2006, was well-known for her controversial interviewing style. She once threw her chador off in protest while speaking with Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini. Wright himself is no stranger to controversy. His latest book "Going Clear" is an in-depth investigation into Scientology and its ties to Hollywood. We'll talk about the fallout from the book and discuss how Fallaci influenced Wright's own journalistic work.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday At the Vatican, Running a Conclave The Pope Emeritus has slipped off his red loafers for a pair of hand-cobbled brown ones. Now the Vatican's focus turns to his successor. Cardinals will meet in the Sistine Chapel to choose a new leader for the troubled Catholic Church.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Cities in Financial Crisis In Detroit, the budget is a mess: at least $40 million short. State treasurer Andy Dillon doesn't see many options. But one possible fix is to appoint an emergency financial manager.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Getting 'Enlightened' The show talks with Mike White about the season finale of the HBO series "Enlightened." Laura Dern plays a naive whistleblower and co-created and co-stars in the series with White.
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Fly on the Wall: Job Interviews for Recent Grads Colleges keep churning out graduates. But employers say they are unsatisfied with the pickings. To get a closer look at that disconnect, the show ushers a soon-to-be graduate into a mock job interview with one of those frustrated businesses.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    New Englanders Way of Tar Sands Oil -- As environmentalists protest a western pipeline, northern New England towns also worry that a pipeline that crosses the region will soon carry tar sands oil from western Canada. Their concerns were heightened recently when the CEO of a local pipeline company told Vermont lawmakers he's looking for new business -- including shipping the controversial heavy crude. Two dozen Vermont towns will consider the issue at their annual meetings this month.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Fly on the Wall: Job Interviews for Recent Grads Colleges keep churning out graduates. But employers say they are unsatisfied with the pickings. To get a closer look at that disconnect, the show ushers a soon-to-be graduate into a mock job interview with one of those frustrated businesses.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Getting 'Enlightened' The show talks with Mike White about the season finale of the HBO series "Enlightened." Laura Dern plays a naive whistleblower and co-created and co-stars in the series with White.
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Gen. Keith Alexander on Cyber Security Threats As the head of United States Cyber Command and the National Security Agency/Central Security Service, General Keith Alexander is at the front lines of many aspects of American national security. While online life has improved many aspects of public life, it has also opened up an entirely new realm of possibilities for those wishing to do harm to the U.S. Drawing on his prestigious education and military career, General Alexander will discuss cyber security challenges facing the U.S. in the modern era.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Lawrence Wright on His New Play and Scientology We talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning author, journalist and playwright Lawrence Wright. His new play on the life of Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci premieres at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre this week. Fallaci, who died in 2006, was well-known for her controversial interviewing style. She once threw her chador off in protest while speaking with Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini. Wright himself is no stranger to controversy. His latest book "Going Clear" is an in-depth investigation into Scientology and its ties to Hollywood. We'll talk about the fallout from the book and discuss how Fallaci influenced Wright's own journalistic work.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Hacking Infrastructure Standing on California Street in downtown San Francisco, you are surrounded by a network of machines that talk to each other. The network controls more and more of our environment with every passing day: the traffic lights; the robotic arms on the street cars; the electrical and HVAC systems; the lights; the water system under your feet. And all of these things are hackable. NPR's Steve Henn explains how hacking infrastructure became possible, why it's so hard to prevent, and why these kinds of attacks probably don't require an army of cyber warriors in Shanghai to pull off.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Syria's 'Conscience of the Revolution' It's been called the "conscience of the revolution." Every Friday, the famed posters of Kafr Nabl respond to the news of the day with the thoughts of the Syrian street. The town is beloved by Syrians, inside and outside -- so beloved that it's now attracting young Syrians from all over the country to come and join the project of building a secular, democratic state. But, like much of the country, there's a new game in town: the Islamists. For the first time this past Friday, they staged their own protests and flew their own flags.
Monday, March 4, 2013

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