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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, February 26, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Printing Firearms As digital technology continues to transform the way objects are manufactured, it's becoming more possible to produce an entire firearm at home. Amateur gunsmiths are now sharing the digital blueprints for making key parts of a gun online on a 3-D printer. One member of Congress has expressed concern about the implications of 3-D printed guns at airports and other public spaces.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Economy, Inequality and Obama's Second Term Robert Reich, former Secretary of Labor, professor, author and one of Time Magazine's 10 most effective cabinet secretaries of the last century sits down for a discussion on the issues at the forefront of the political debate in the U.S.: the state of the economy, inequality in the US and expectations for Obama's second term.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition A Papal Precedent Celestine the Fifth was an unusual choice for Pope, seven hundred years ago. He was a hermit who lived in a cave. He resigned after just a few months in office. But his resignation paved the way for Pope Benedict to quit now.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Yahoo Bans Working From Home Yahoo Inc. told employees last week that they may no longer work from home or other remote locations. The announcement came as a surprise in an industry known for non-traditional work arrangements and generous employee perks. According to the U.S. Census, the number of people working from home has increased steadily, with almost 10 percent of the workforce working from home at least one day a week. We'll discuss flexible work programs: Do they increase or hurt productivity?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Roman Mars is '99% Invisible' Roman Mars produces a radio show and podcast called "99% Invisible" that focuses on design and architecture. But that doesn't just mean buildings: Roman investigates the history of everything from cul-de-sacs and subway escalators to monks who make beer. Roman Mars joins Forum to talk about how "99% Invisible" went from an underground pet project to a Kickstarter success story, and why fans call him "the Ira Glass of design."
  • 10:30 am
    Forum Kim Gordon on Life After Sonic Youth Former Sonic Youth singer and guitarist Kim Gordon says that since she was five years old, all she ever wanted to be was an artist. Music, she says, was just an escape from the art world. Maybe so, but Sonic Youth's groundbreaking sound has influenced everyone from Nirvana to Russian-dissident band Pussy Riot. Sonic Youth disbanded in 2011, after Gordon's marriage to bandmate Thurston Moore ended. But she continues to perform, as well as to create and exhibit her visual art.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Hezbollah Without Syrian Support Syria is one of the militant group Hezbollah's most important backers. Along with Iran, they're known as the Shiite axis. But after two years of civil war, the future of Shiites -- in a Sunni-dominated Arab world -- is in question.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday One Year After Trayvon Martin's Death One year ago, unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin was shot and killed in Florida. Since then, parents, teachers, community watchers and members of law enforcement have all had conversations about what happened, and how to prevent similar tragedies in the future.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Developing Irresistible Snacks America's love affair with processed foods and its effect on health is no secret. Michael Moss takes us inside food industry research labs where scientists develop snacks we just can't resist. He says there have been studies which show that the more noise a potato chip makes, the more attracted we are to eat it. His new book is "Salt, Sugar, Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us."
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace A Better Way to Manage the Budget Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talks to former finance executive Pete Peterson about his desire to see America take a more sustainable approach to budget management. And about how he's using his personal wealth to ensure deficits and debt remain part of the national conversation.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Iran Talks Obstacles -- International talks over Iran's nuclear program have resumed after an eight-month pause, this time in Kazakhstan. World powers are focusing on small steps that Iran could take in order to bring some partial relief from crippling economic sanctions. The prospects of a bigger breakthrough are limited by mistrust, by a negative political environment and by a large gap between what western powers are seeking from Iran and what Iran seems willing to offer.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace A Better Way to Manage the Budget Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talks to former finance executive Pete Peterson about his desire to see America take a more sustainable approach to budget management. And about how he's using his personal wealth to ensure deficits and debt remain part of the national conversation.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Developing Irresistible Snacks America's love affair with processed foods and its effect on health is no secret. Michael Moss takes us inside food industry research labs where scientists develop snacks we just can't resist. He says there have been studies which show that the more noise a potato chip makes, the more attracted we are to eat it. His new book is "Salt, Sugar, Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us."
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Jamaica Kincaid Jamaica Kincaid is the author of numerous works of fiction and non-fiction. Born in Antigua, the acclaimed writer first gained recognition for her "Talk of the Town" pieces and short stories published in The New Yorker in the late 1970s. She published her first book, "At the Bottom of the River," a collection of short stories, in 1981. Her first novel, Annie John, was published four years later, and made her a literary sensation. Kincaid is also the author of" Lucy," "My Garden" and "A Small Place," an indictment of tourism and colonialism. Her forthcoming novel, "See Now Then" -- her first in ten years -- is a tale of marriage and family that examines how the passing of time operates on the human consciousness.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Yahoo Bans Working From Home Yahoo Inc. told employees last week that they may no longer work from home or other remote locations. The announcement came as a surprise in an industry known for non-traditional work arrangements and generous employee perks. According to the U.S. Census, the number of people working from home has increased steadily, with almost 10 percent of the workforce working from home at least one day a week. We'll discuss flexible work programs: Do they increase or hurt productivity?
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Remembering Ray Cusick, Father of Daleks Audie Cornish and Melissa Block talk about the passing of former production designer Ray Cusick. Cusick designed the Daleks, an evil alien race on the long-running BBC sci-fi show, "Doctor Who."
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered GOP Brief on Gay Marriage A large group of prominent Republicans signed on to an amicus brief that argues in favor of a constitutional right to marry for gay Americans. Only two of the politicians, however, are likely to face voters again. While the public at large has moved rapidly on the issue and now favors gay marriage, Republican voters do not. NPR's Don Gonyea reports on the argument, both legal and political.
Tuesday, February 26, 2013

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