Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, February 21, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, February 21, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Benghazi Politics Benghazi has become a refrain that Republicans return to again and again. Is it a successful political strategy, and is there any substance left to uncover from the attack on the U.S. consulate last September?
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials State of the Valley Conference 2013 State of the Valley is Silicon Valley's annual "town meeting" -- a tradition at least as old as our nation's founding, where concerned citizens met on the village green to mobilize for the challenges ahead. In that same spirit, Joint Ventures town meeting convenes the entire region of concerned citizens and stakeholders, thought leaders and opinion makers, journalists, our elected representatives, educators and academics, business executives, labor and workforce leaders for dialogue and discussion about the Valley's challenges and opportunities.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Movie Set Costs Hollywood set decorators can spend a million on a single movie. But for the blockbuster Thor, the silverware in a banquet scene came from Target. NPR visits the sets of a blockbuster in the making, and a low-budget indie film.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum 'Overheated: The Human Cost of Climate Change' Andrew Guzman realizes that his warnings about the human costs of climate change might come across as alarmist. "But that's because we should be alarmed," he writes in his new book "Overheated." The UC Berkeley law professor believes that there has been too much discussion about the science of climate change, and not enough about the likely consequences -- things like famine, war and mass migration. Guzman joins us in the studio.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum And the Oscar Goes to... Movie critics were surprised when Ben Affleck wasn't nominated for a Best Director Oscar. Will his film "Argo" be vindicated with other awards on Sunday? Will the story of the killing of bin Laden or the tale of the president who saved the U.S. from being split in two take home Best Picture? We talk with a panel of film critics in advance of this weekend's Academy Awards about their favorite (and least favorite) of the nominees.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Religious Exemptions There's heated debate over exempting birth control from health coverage. The issue may even reach the Supreme Court. But this is hardly the only such exemption that's been hammered out in the U.S. From vaccines, to school attendance, to photo IDs; who gets a religious exemption and why?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Same-Sex Couples and the Military The Defense Department is expanding benefits for same-sex military couples. By October, partners will be able to shop at the commissary, use child care and get counseling. But housing on base and burial at Arlington are still under review. What's changed for gay couples in the military -- and what hasn't?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Dr. Sam Parnia Terry Gross talks with Dr. Sam Parnia who studies what people experience in that period after their heart has stopped and before they're resuscitated -- what are often called "near death experiences."
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Nuclear Safety and Costs The disaster at Japans Fukushima nuclear power plant led American regulators to impose new rules in this country. But that's led to a debate about whether expensive safety measures are really necessary when there is a small risk of danger.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    The Travails of Cutting State Taxes -- Income tax cuts are all the rage this winter among Republican governors. There are no fewer than 10 of them proposing significant reductions in their states' income tax rates. In fact, governors of neighboring states seem to be trying to one-up each other with tax cut proposals, urging businesses to move across the border. In most cases, the GOP governors are looking to raise or expand the sales tax to make up lost revenue. But in Indiana and a few of the other states, the governors are getting pushback from their fellow Republicans; some because they campaigned on promises to not raise any tax, and some fearing the tax cuts will force budget cuts that will be too great.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Nuclear Safety and Costs The disaster at Japans Fukushima nuclear power plant led American regulators to impose new rules in this country. But that's led to a debate about whether expensive safety measures are really necessary when there is a small risk of danger.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Dr. Sam Parnia Terry Gross talks with Dr. Sam Parnia who studies what people experience in that period after their heart has stopped and before they're resuscitated -- what are often called "near death experiences."
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials The Long Now Foundation Presents: Chris Anderson and the Maker Revolution Chris Anderson's book "The Long Tail" chronicled how the Internet revolutionized and democratized distribution. His new book "Makers" shows how the same thing is happening to manufacturing, with even wider consequences, and this time the leading revolutionaries are the young of the world. Anderson himself left his job as editor of Wired magazine to join a 22-year-old from Tijuana in running a typical makers firm, 3D Robotics, which builds do-it-yourself drones.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum 'Overheated: The Human Cost of Climate Change' Andrew Guzman realizes that his warnings about the human costs of climate change might come across as alarmist. "But that's because we should be alarmed," he writes in his new book "Overheated." The UC Berkeley law professor believes that there has been too much discussion about the science of climate change, and not enough about the likely consequences -- things like famine, war and mass migration. Guzman joins us in the studio.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Spain Royal Shame There is no end, it seems, to revelations about corruption in Spain, exacerbated by the country's economic crisis. Now, corruption has tainted the royal family. The husband of Spain's Princess Infanta Cristina is accused of embezzling millions of dollars in public funds. The king has cut his son-in-law out of the royal budget, and banished him from family events. Questions persist about how much Cristina herself knows -- and whether she may also be involved.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Curt Schilling's Sock for Sale Baseball fans and collectors are currently bidding on a piece of baseball history: a bloody sock worn by former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling in the 2004 World Series. The sock had been on loan to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. But Schilling was forced to sell it to help repay personal loan guarantees to a failed video game venture in Rhode Island. The sock is expected to go for $100,000 or more. And while Schilling's reputation as a baseball hero in Boston remains intact, fans and taxpayers in Rhode Island on the hook for his business failings see him in a different light.
Thursday, February 21, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.