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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, February 18, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, February 18, 2013
  • 12:00 am
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA Battling Addiction in New Mexico The state of New Mexico has the highest rate of drug-related deaths in the nation. Hispanics and Native Americans have borne the brunt of this devastation. In Albuquerque's historically Latino South Valley neighborhood, black tar heroin has plagued families for generations. And prescription opiates have become an even bigger problem. But these days, the community is tapping into centuries-old cultural practices to help addicts find a new path to recovery.
  • 1:30 am
    Cambridge Forum Charles Sumner at 200: Civil Rights in America Charles Sumner, 19th century abolitionist and U.S. senator, is best known as the senator who was almost fatally beaten in the Senate chamber by a pro-slavery representative from South Carolina in the run-up to the Civil War. Beverly Morgan-Welch, executive director of the Museum of African-American History, and Daniel Coquillette, visiting professor at Harvard Law School, discuss Sumner's wider significance in America's ongoing debates about Civil Rights.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money College IDs as Credit Cards For about 40 percent of U.S. college students, their student IDs not only get them into the library, but also pays for dinner, a movie or whatever they want. That's because more and more IDs also function as debit cards. But there's growing concern over how colleges and banks work out those co-branded agreements. As the program reports, it's capturing the attention of lawmakers.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition New Cancer Drugs, Strategies for Coping Multiple myeloma is a brutal form of blood cell cancer. But some new drugs are transforming the disease. The show looks at new cancer drugs, and new strategies for coping with the side effects of cancer treatments.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum What Does Silicon Valley Want From Obama's Second Term? Silicon Valley donated over $14 million to President Obama's re-election campaign, and the president made quite a few promises on his many visits to the region, including steps toward immigration reform. We'll discuss what Silicon Valley leaders want from Congress and Obama's second term administration when it comes to upgrading visa laws, tax shelters and online privacy.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Newlyweds Search for a Bone Marrow Donor Last year, Kevin Weston was riding high. He had just won a journalism fellowship at Stanford, and was raising two daughters with his partner Lateefah Simon, a civil rights activist and MacArthur Genius fellow. Then doctors told him he had leukemia, and needed to find a bone marrow donor by the end of the month. But Kevin is African-American -- and African-Americans comprise only 7 percent of registered donors. Kevin and Lateefah join us to share their story. We'll also discuss the low rate of minority donor participation and the long road to a successful transplant.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Best Places to Thrive Do you want to know the secret to happiness? Dan Buettner says, find happy friends. Buettner spent five years on a search for the happiest people in the world and asked: what's the secret? Dan Buettner joins host Neal Conan with the answers,
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday 'The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks' Henrietta Lacks died more than 60 years ago. Her cells, though, are immortal. She provided modern medicine with the first line of cells that doctors could reproduce and research endlessly. Her family got nothing. Author Rebecca Skloot talks about "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks."
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Inaugural Poet Reflects Changing America For Presidents Day, the show talks with Richard Blanco, who read his poem "One Today" at President Obama's second inauguration last month. Blanco is the fifth and the youngest of America's inaugural poets. He's also the first Latino. His parents emigrated from Cuba, and he's the first openly gay writer chosen for the role.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Lost Hendrix Tape A literary scholar and Jimi Hendrix fan gained access to a lost recording of an important concert by Hendrix -- and he calls it the concert-tape find of the century.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace In Turkey, a Fight Over 'Idaho' In the far-off lands of Turkey, there's a battle brewing over the word "Idaho." And of course, it all has to do with Idaho's famous potatoes.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace In Turkey, a Fight Over 'Idaho' In the far-off lands of Turkey, there's a battle brewing over the word "Idaho." And of course, it all has to do with Idaho's famous potatoes.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Inaugural Poet Reflects Changing America For Presidents Day, the show talks with Richard Blanco, who read his poem "One Today" at President Obama's second inauguration last month. Blanco is the fifth and the youngest of America's inaugural poets. He's also the first Latino. His parents emigrated from Cuba, and he's the first openly gay writer chosen for the role.
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Rational Approaches to Renewable Energy Renewable energy is becoming big business, and that business is now in crisis. From Silicon Valley to Washington and Berlin to Beijing, many investors in solar, wind and other clean-energy technologies are losing a lot of money. Yesterday's green euphoria is giving way to a realization that developing these technologies is a challenge. Today's growing pains aren't a reason to abandon the renewable-energy push, but are a reason to get smarter about it. Jeffrey Ball, a longtime energy reporter and environment editor at The Wall Street Journal and now a scholar-in-residence at Stanford University, will discuss a more economically rational way to expand renewables.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Europe's Controversial 'Baby Boxes' Scores of "baby boxes" have appeared in houses and hospitals across Europe in the past decade where mothers can anonymously and safely "post" newborns they cannot care for. The box opens onto the street, and contains a bassinette and blankets. When the infant is placed inside and the door is closed, it can't be opened from the street again. Meanwhile, an alarm goes off inside and a neonatal team rushes to care for the infant. The boxes are extremely controversial. Advocates say they save babies' lives. The U.N. is alarmed at their rising numbers.
Monday, February 18, 2013

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